From AccuWeather.com:

Before you dive into Shark Week on the Discovery Channel (Aug. 4 - 11), check out six things you may not know about sharks.

From anti-shark wetsuits to "Sharknado," you don't have to wait to find out what's new in the watery world of sharks.

1. Researchers have begun tagging great white sharks to learn about the still-mysterious animals.

On July 30, nonprofit shark research group OCEARCH and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) began the most ambitious great white shark-tagging mission undertaken in history.

During the initial tagging, researchers will take blood and tissue samples to test their health and diet and also attach GPS tags to track their swimming patterns. These measures are being taken by these groups to understand the elusive great white sharks and to educate the public on their importance to the ocean.

2. An Australian company created "anti-shark wetsuits" to help protect swimmers and surfers from attacks.

Although it's presumed most shark attacks on humans usually only occur because sharks mistake swimmers for seals or other tasty marine life, a company is looking to decrease that risk by creating anti-shark wetsuits.

The "Diverter" wetsuit is colored with black and white stripes, to mimic poisonous fish that also sport that pattern. The "Elude" model uses blue wavelike patterns to camouflage swimmers within the water. While they can't be proven to deter shark attacks with any certainty, the company is continuing to test them in shark-infested waters. Good luck to the test subjects!

3. Stay apprised of lifeguard station flags to stay safe from wild marine life.

Wyatt Werneth, Spokesman for the American Lifeguard Association, explained that when a blue flag is raised at the beach, it means that marine life was spotted in the water. When a red flag is raised, it means the marine life was likely a shark and the area should be avoided. When these flags are raised, Wyatt recommends that people exit the water calmly, "You don't want to splash and make a sudden rush to the shoreline and panic. If a shark is sighted, get out of the water."

To make the most of your beach vacation, remember to stay alert of any marine life. "Realize that humans are land animals and anytime we go into the ocean we are challenging ourselves," Greg Skomal, a Shark Specialist at the Massachusetts Marine Fisheries, said. "It's a wild environment."

4. "Sharknado" creates a wave in social media; could it really happen?

The SyFy channel aired a new movie, pragmatically named "Sharknado," about a shark-bearing and hurricane-spawned tornadoes hitting Southern California.

Hopefully you weren't worried that a "Sharknado" could erupt this hurricane season. However, if you need some reassurance, AccuWeather.com meteorologists explain why the movie doesn't hold water.

5. If you are afraid of sharks, don't go swimming in Fiji!

Namena Reserve, off the southern coast of Fiji's second largest island, is a protected space for sharks with strict no-fishing laws. As a result, the shark population is thriving. You can find up to four times the amount of sharks in the Reserve as compared to non-protected zones.

6. There has been a significant increase of shark sightings in the New England area.

Seal populations have boomed in New England over the past few decades, which Tony LaCasse, biologist and spokesperson for the New England Aquarium in Boston, attributes to conservation efforts and the 1972 Marine Mammal Protection Act. Since then, reported sightings of great white shark have greatly increased as well.

Though the number of shark sightings has increased, they are not necessarily presenting a bigger threat, as there has not been a shark-related death in New England since 1936. LaCrosse also attributes many of the shark sightings to basking sharks, which do not eat mammals and present no threat to humans. However, their dorsal fins resemble that of great whites which raises fears among beach-goers.

Now that you've dipped your toes in the shark-infested waters, tune into Discovery Channel's Shark Week beginning Sunday, Aug. 4.

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  • In this handout picture released by Awashima Marine Park, a 1.6 meter long Frill shark swims in a tank after being found by a fisherman at a bay in Numazu, on January 21, 2007 in Numazu, Japan. The frill shark, also known as a Frilled shark usually lives in waters of a depth of 600 meters and so it is very rare that this shark is found alive at sea-level. Its body shape and the number of gill are similar to fossils of sharks which lived 350,000,000 years ago. (Photo by Awashima Marine Park/Getty Images)

  • A shark swims in a tank at the New York Aquarium on August 7, 2001 in Coney Island, New York City. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

  • A June 11, 2009 file photo provided by Elasmodiver shows scientist Eric Hoffmayer of the University of Southern Mississippi's Gulf Coast Research Lab in Ocean Springs, Miss., taking fin measurements of a whale shark in the Gulf of Mexico, about 55 miles off the Louisiana coast. Hoffmayer says whale sharks, the world's biggest fish, are particularly vulnerable if they get into the oil slick. That's because, rather than moving up to the surface and down again, they eat by swimming along the surface, sucking in plankton, fish eggs and small fish. (AP Photo/Elasmodiver, Andy Murch, File)

  • Home And Away actor Jon Sivewright launches the new Adventure experience Grey Nurse Shark Feed Dive at Manly's Ocean World on December 18, 2006 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo by Patrick Riviere/Getty Images)

  • This Saturday, June 26, 2010 photo released by Bruce Sweet shows a juvenile great white shark swimming in the Atlantic Ocean about 20 miles off the coast of Gloucester, Mass., in the rich fishing ground known as Stellwagen Bank. The shark was pulled up by Gloucester-based Sweet Dream III, tagged, and returned to the sea. (AP Photo/www.SportFishingMA.com, Bruce Sweet)

  • A shark swims in a tank at the New York Aquarium August 7, 2001 in Coney Island, New York City. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

  • A shark swim inside a fish tank as a diver, left, cleans the glass at the Two Oceans Aquarium in Cape Town, South Africa, Wednesday, Aug 31, 2011. The Two Oceans Aquarium hosts group activities for school children and students which include the identification and observation of fish and other species. (AP Photo/Schalk van Zuydam)

  • In this handout picture released by Awashima Marine Park, a 1.6 meter long Frill shark swims in a tank after being found by a fisherman at a bay in Numazu, on January 21, 2007 in Numazu, Japan. The frill shark, also known as a Frilled shark usually lives in waters of a depth of 600 meters and so it is very rare that this shark is found alive at sea-level. Its body shape and the number of gill are similar to fossils of sharks which lived 350,000,000 years ago. (Photo by Awashima Marine Park/Getty Images)

  • In this picture taken on September 3, 2011, an environmental activist releases a baby black-tip shark into the sea as part of an operation organised by the sharks protection group Dive Tribe off the coast of the southern Thai sea resort of Pattaya. On average an estimated 22,000 tonnes of sharks are caught annually off Thailand for their fins -- a delicacy in Chinese cuisine once enjoyed only by the rich, but now increasingly popular with the wealthier middle class. (CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Walter Szulc Jr., in kayak at left, looks back at the dorsal fin of an approaching shark at Nauset Beach in Orleans, Mass. in Cape Cod on Saturday, July 7, 2012. An unidentified man in the foreground looks towards them. No injuries were reported. The previous week, a 12- to 15-foot great white shark was seen off Chatham in the first confirmed shark sighting of the season according to a state researcher. Two more sightings were reported Tuesday, July 2, 2012. The same waters are filled with seals, which draw the sharks because they are a favorite food of the animal. (AP Photo/Shelly Negrotti)

  • This undated photo released by The Galapagos National Park of Ecuador shows a diver alongside a whale shark in the Galapagos Island, Ecuador. (AP Photo/The Galapagos National Park of Ecuador)

  • Blacktip reef shark

    A green sea turtle (R) (Chelonia mydas) swims next to a blacktip reef shark (L) (Carcharhinus melanopterus) in the aquarium of the Haus des Meeres ('House of the Sea'), in Vienna on June 27, 2012. (ALEXANDER KLEIN/AFP/GettyImages)

  • A blacktip reef shark

    A blacktip reef shark (Carcharhinus melanopterus) swims in the aquarium of the Haus des Meeres ('House of the Sea') in Vienna on June 27, 2012. (ALEXANDER KLEIN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Bonnethead shark

    A Bonnethead shark swims at the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach, California, on April 26, 2012.The Aquarium features a collection of over 11,000 animals representing over 500 different species. It focuses on the Pacific Ocean in three major permanent galleries, sunny Southern California and Baja, the frigid waters of the Northern Pacific and the colorful reefs of the Tropical Pacific.The non-profit Aquarium sees 1.5 million visitors a year and has a total staff of over 900 people including more than 300 employees and about 650 volunteers. (JOE KLAMAR/AFP/GettyImages)

  • Blacktip reef shark

    A blacktip reef shark (Carcharhinus melanopterus swims in the aquarium of the Haus des Meeres in Vienna on June 27, 2012. (ALEXANDER KLEIN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Baby Nurse Shark Birth Captured on Camera

    The newborn is being kept away from the rest of the sharks at Yantai Haichang Whale and Shark Aquarium.

  • Rare Shark Frenzy Caught On Camera

    A school of feasting sharks was captured on camera just a few hundred meters off shore in Perth, Australia.

  • A blacktip reef shark (Carcharhinus mela

    A blacktip reef shark (Carcharhinus melanopterus) swims in the aquarium of the Haus des Meeres ('House of the Sea') in Vienna on June 27, 2012. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER KLEIN (Photo credit should read ALEXANDER KLEIN/AFP/GettyImages)