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Gorgeous Black-And-White Storm Photos Will Make You Feel Really, Really Small

There's nothing quite like gazing up at a turbulent sky to make you realize how small and powerless you really are. In case you don't have a real storm brewing in your neighborhood, we recommend turning to Mitch Dobrowner's stunning black-and-white photography for that shattering and humbling sensation.

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Dobrowner's photos, made in a dry/digital darkroom, capture a magnitude and force beyond human comprehension. Impossible to measure or describe, the beastly skies take up both the foreground and background of Dobrowner's skyscapes, and all we can do is stare.

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"When taking photographs, time and space seem hard for me to measure," Dobrowner writes in his artist statement. "Whenever I shoot a ‘quality’ image, I know it. At those moments things are quiet, seem simple again – and I obtain a respect and reverence for the world that is hard to communicate through words. For me those moments happen when the exterior environment and my interior world combine."

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Through Dobrowner's sharp-eyed lens, tornado swirls, storm clouds and lightning bolts gain an almost otherworldly power, reminding us of the majesty emanating from Renaissance portraits of a heavenly sphere. Although there is no divine reference in Dobrowner's work, he surely points to a different breed of unknowable forces at work right above us.

See Dobrowner's stormy skies below and let us know your thoughts in the comments.

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Dobrowner's "Storms" will go on view from September 7 until October 26 at Kopeikin Gallery in Los Angeles.

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Filed by Priscilla Frank  |