"In a while, crocodile!" has never been said with so much joy.

New Zealand kayaker Ryan Blair was trapped on a small island off the coast of Australia for more than two weeks by a huge crocodile, 9 News reported.

Blair, 37, was exploring the waters near Kalamburu and wound up on Governor Island, about 2.5 miles from the mainland. When he decided to head back, he soon found he was sharing the island with an enormous reptile who had other plans.

Whenever he attempted to leave the island, Blair says, the croc chased him and blocked his exit. In a kayak that, at about 8 feet long, is less than half the estimated length of the crocodile, Blair felt he didn't stand a chance.

Blair was rescued Saturday, after Kalumburu resident Don MacLeod saw a light coming from the island and went to investigate, Australian public broadcaster ABC reported.

Blair noted he had been trying to use a fire to signal to passing boats for days, but to no avail.

MacLeod told the Rural Report that he's seen the "very, very large" croc a few times. He estimates it's about 19.5 feet long.

Though Blair has been receiving a good deal of media attention for his adventure, locals are not impressed.

"Everyone's treating him like he's a hero," Anne Koeyers, manager of the Drysdale River Station in North Kimberley told Fairfax Media. "He's not a hero, he's an idiot."

Koeyers noted that Blair should have known not to go out to the island "in the first place" and should have spoken with locals first.

"Learn about the area. Learn about the dangers. Learn about what to do. Know the water. There's crocs in there. How could anyone not know that?" Koeyers said.



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  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    A crocodile (Crocodylus Acutus) eats meat in a pond in San Manuel, Cortes department, 200 Km north of Tegucigalpa on October 17, 2012. Private entrepreneurs started the raising of crocodriles to export their skin and meat to the United States and Europe.

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    In this photo taken Sept. 4, 2011 photo, residents gather around a huge crocodile, later named "Lolong," following its capture by residents and crocodile farm staff along a creek in Bunawan township, Agusan Del Sur province in southern Philippines. The 1-ton crocodile, measuring 20.24 feet (6.17 meters) and proclaimed by Guinness World Records as the world's largest saltwater crocodile in captivity, died Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013. (AP Photo)

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    In this Sunday Sept. 4, 2011 file photo, police and residents pose with the now deceased crocodile, "Lolong," following its capture by residents and crocodile farm staff along a creek in Bunawan township, Agusan Del Sur province in southern Philippines. The 1-ton crocodile, measuring 20.24 feet (6.17 meters) and proclaimed by Guinness World Records as the world's largest saltwater crocodile in captivity, died Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013. (AP Photo/File)

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    In this Sept. 6, 2011 photo, "Lolong," the world's largest saltwater crocodile in captivity according to the Guinness World Records, rests in his pen, two days after being captured by residents and staff of a crocodile farm along a creek in Bunawan township, Agusan Del Sur province in southern Philippines. The saltwater male crocodile, measuring 20.24 feet (6.17 meters) died Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013. (AP Photo/File)

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    In this Sept. 4, 2011 file photo, residents watch as Mayor Cox Elorde of Bunawan township, Agusan del Sur province, pretends to measure a huge crocodile, later named "Lolong," after its capture by residents and staff of a crocodile farm along a creek in Bunawan in southern Philippines. The saltwater male crocodile, measuring 20.24 feet (6.17 meters) and proclaimed by Guinness World Records as the world's largest saltwater crocodile in captivity, died Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013. (AP Photo/File)

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    A worker places blocks of ice around "Lolong," the world's largest saltwater crocodile in captivity according to the Guinness World Records, as they wait for its autopsy Monday Feb. 11, 2013 at Bunawan township, Agusan Del Sur province in southern Philippines. The crocodile, measuring 20.24 feet (6.17 meters) and weighing more than a ton, died Sunday Feb. 10, 2013, 17 months after its capture by crocodile farm staff and some residents of this township. The southern Philippine town plans to hold funeral rites for the world's largest saltwater crocodile and then preserve its remains in a museum to keep tourists coming and prevent their community from slipping back into obscurity, the town's mayor said Monday. (AP Photo/Erwin Mascarinas)

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    A worker puts ice blocks at the remains of the 6.17 metre long saltwater crocodile named 'Lolong' on February 11, 2013, in the town of Bunawan, Agusan del Sur province on the southern Philippine island of Mindanao. The world's largest saltwater crocodile in captivity has died in the southern Philippines, 17 months after it was captured and displayed in a small pond, his caretakers said February 11.

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    This photo taken Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013 shows a couple of the recaptured crocodiles back safely on the farm they escaped from, at Pontdrif, South Africa, near the Botswana border. About 7,000 of the creatures escaped when the gates on a dam were opened this week to alleviate pressure created by rising flood waters. About 2,000 had been recaptured Friday, Jan. 25, 2013. Video from the scene shows people hunting down the small-ish crocs at night, tying them up and taking them back to the Rakwena Crocodile Farm, in northern South Africa. The farm, which didn't respond to an email or calls seeking comment, used to hold 15,000 crocodiles (AP Photo)

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    Hundreds of 18 month-old crocodiles (Crocodylus Acutus) remain in a pond in San Manuel, Cortes department, 200 Km north of Tegucigalpa on October 17, 2012. Private entrepreneurs started the raising of crocodriles to export their skin and meat to the United States and Europe.

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    A man holds a 18 month-old crocodile (Crocodylus Acutus) in San Manuel, Cortes department, 200 Km north of Tegucigalpa on October 17, 2012. Private entrepreneurs started the raising of crocodriles to export their skin and meat to the United States and Europe.

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    A man cleans crocodile (Crocodylus Acutus) skin at a farm in San Manuel, Cortes department, 200 Km north of Tegucigalpa on October 17, 2012. Private entrepreneurs started the raising of crocodriles to export their skin and meat to the United States and Europe.

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    A very old crocodile (Crocodylus Acutus), more than 100 years according local people, turns in a pond in San Manuel, Cortes department, 200 Km north of Tegucigalpa on October 17, 2012. Private entrepreneurs started the raising of crocodriles to export their skin and meat to the United States and Europe.

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - OCTOBER 03: Rex, one of the world's largest crocodiles sits in the water prior to being fed at WILD LIFE Sydney Zoo on October 3, 2012 in Sydney, Australia. The 700kg crocodile ate his first meal today, after three months in hibernation. (Photo by Cameron Spencer/Getty Images)

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - OCTOBER 03: Rex, one of the world's largest crocodiles sits in the water prior to being fed at WILD LIFE Sydney Zoo on October 3, 2012 in Sydney, Australia. The 700kg crocodile ate his first meal today, after three months in hibernation. (Photo by Cameron Spencer/Getty Images)

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - OCTOBER 03: Rex, one of the world's largest crocodiles eats beef ribs at WILD LIFE Sydney Zoo on October 3, 2012 in Sydney, Australia, after three months in hibernation. (Photo by Cameron Spencer/Getty Images)

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    A 700 kilogram crocodile called Rex - who is one of the world’s largest crocodiles - cruises around his enclosure after receiving his first feed after emerging from three months of hibernation at WILD LIFE Sydney Zoo on October 3, 2012. Throughout winter, it is common for crocodiles to enter a period of inactivity where they survive on their existing energy stores inside their body but once the weather starts warming up, so does their appetite – to indicate their need to replenish their energy. Rex, who has been a resident of WILD LIFE Sydney Zoo since 2009, was a so-called ‘rogue’ crocodile who was captured and placed into a crocodile farm near Darwin in the Northern Territory when his taste for local pet dogs drew him too close to the human population.

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    A 700 kilogram crocodile called Rex - who is one of the world’s largest crocodiles - cruises around his enclosure after receiving his first feed after emerging from three months of hibernation at WILD LIFE Sydney Zoo on October 3, 2012. Throughout winter, it is common for crocodiles to enter a period of inactivity where they survive on their existing energy stores inside their body but once the weather starts warming up, so does their appetite – to indicate their need to replenish their energy. Rex, who has been a resident of WILD LIFE Sydney Zoo since 2009, was a so-called ‘rogue’ crocodile who was captured and placed into a crocodile farm near Darwin in the Northern Territory when his taste for local pet dogs drew him too close to the human population.

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    In a picture taken on June 20, 2012, an albino Philippine crocodile swims at an enclosure at the Manila Zoo. The historic Manila Zoo, once a major attraction of the Philippines, now finds itself the target of criticism for the condition of its animals, particularly its 'star', an elephant named Mali.

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    FLORIDA CITY, FL - JUNE 28: A crocodile is seen in a canal near the Florida Power & Light's Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant where they protect the crocodile and conduct research by counting their nests annually to record population changes June 28, 2012 near Florida City, Florida. Wasilewski, a biologist, studies the reptile and helps in developing and constructing the American crocodile nesting habitat near the power plant. The American crocodile had been on the endangered species list but has been taken off that list and put on the threatened list. With the success of the program to help save the crocodile their populations around developed areas will continue to grow which means that there may be more encounters between humans and the reptile. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    FLORIDA CITY, FL - JUNE 28: A crocodile hatchling is seen before it is release it into a canal near the Florida Power & Light's Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant where they protect the crocodile and conduct research by counting their nests annually to record population changes June 28, 2012 near Florida City, Florida. Wasilewski, a biologist, studies the reptile and helps in developing and constructing the American crocodile nesting habitat near the power plant. The American crocodile had been on the endangered species list but has been taken off that list and put on the threatened list. With the success of the program to help save the crocodile their populations around developed areas will continue to grow which means that there may be more encounters between humans and the reptile. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    In a picture taken on June 20, 2012, an albino Philippine crocodile swims at an enclosure at the Manila Zoo. The historic Manila Zoo, once a major attraction of the Philippines, now finds itself the target of criticism for the condition of its animals, particularly its 'star', an elephant named Mali.

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    This photograph taken on June 4, 2012 shows an Indonesian wildlife specialist checking over a crocodile rescued from an abandoned zoo, upon its arrival at the Kalaweit sanctuary in Pararawen village, run by French environmentalist Aurélien Brulé. For 15 years Aurelien Brule has lived in the Indonesian jungle, crusading against palm oil multinationals, loggers and corruption in his bid to save endangered gibbons from annihilation.

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    A picture taken on April 12, 2012 shows a white albino alligator at the Alligator Bay zoological park in Beauvoir, western France. Three albino alligators, two female and a male coming from the US, arrived at the park, joining the 200 alligators and crocodiles shown in their recreated natural environment, inside a tropical greenhouse.

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    A picture taken on April 12, 2012 shows a white albino alligator at the Alligator Bay zoological park in Beauvoir, western France. Three albino alligators, two female and a male coming from the US, arrived at the park, joining the 200 alligators and crocodiles shown in their recreated natural environment, inside a tropical greenhouse.

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    A picture taken on April 12, 2012 shows a white albino alligator at the Alligator Bay zoological park in Beauvoir, western France. Three albino alligators, two female and a male coming from the US, arrived at the park, joining the 200 alligators and crocodiles shown in their recreated natural environment, inside a tropical greenhouse. AFP PHOTO CHARLY TRIBALLEAU

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    A picture taken on April 12, 2012 shows a white albino alligator at the Alligator Bay zoological park in Beauvoir, western France. Three albino alligators, two female and a male coming from the US, arrived at the park, joining the 200 alligators and crocodiles shown in their recreated natural environment, inside a tropical greenhouse.

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    This photo taken on December 22, 2011 shows reptile keeper Billy Collett offering a 5kg salmon adorned in Christmas decorations to 'Elvis' the five-metre-long saltwater crocodile at the Australian Reptile Park near Sydney. On December 28 'Elvis', who has already killed two potential mates, attacked staff with a lawn mower inside his enclosure. A rescue mission was mounted a few hours later to retrieve the mower, which the huge crocodile had dragged underwater.

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    Australian zoologist Adam Britton (L) measures a captive crocodile in Bunawan town, Agusan del Sur province, in the Philippines southern island of Mindanao on November 9, 2011. A small Philippine town on Novemer 9 laid claim to having the world's largest captive crocodile after an Australian expert measured the saltwater beast at 20.3 feet (6.187 metres). The male reptile was captured in Bunawan in the Agusan marsh on the southern island of Mindanao in September and measured on Wednesday by Australian zoologist Adam Britton, Bunawan town council member Apollo Canoy said.

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    In this photo taken on September 21, 2011, Lolong, a one-tonne (6.4-metre) 21-foot crocodile believed to be the biggest to have ever been caught, is seen in a caged pen in the southern Philippine town of Bunawan. Deep inside the Philippines' largest marshland, tribespeople who once revered crocodiles as mystical creatures say they now feel terrorised by them. AFP PHOTO / JAY DIRECTO

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    In this photo released by the Alameda County Sheriffs office, an alligator named "Mr. Teeth" is seen after it was discovered in a home in Castro Valley, Calif., on Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013. Authorities say the alligator, apparently used to protect a stash of marijuana inside the home, has been taken to a zoo. When deputies entered Assif Mayar's home on Wednesday for a probation check, they found 34 pounds of marijuana and the five-foot alligator in a tank in the bedroom. (AP Photo/Alameda County Sheriffs)

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    Rob Neil poses with the 12-foot alligator he caught on Sept. 12, 2012 in the Intracoastal Waterway in Bourg, La. Neil sold the gator to Big Al's restaurant in Houma. (AP Photo/The Houma Daily Courier, Chris Heller)

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    Rob Neil poses with the 12-foot alligator he caught Wednesday morning, Sept. 12, 2012 in the Intracoastal Waterway in Bourg, La. Neil sold the gator to Big Al's restaurant in Houma. (AP Photo/The Houma Daily Courier, Chris Heller)

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    One of the crocodiles at Gatorama near Palmdale, Fla. leaps out of the water to grab food from an animal keeper Sunday, Aug. 19, 2012. It is the time of year that chirping, grunting and snapping baby alligators emerge from their shells to meet the world. Gatorama is marking this occasion by hosting an “Alligator Hatching Festival” at its animal park. The park got 3233 alligator eggs from this year's harvest of more than 37,000 eggs gathered by state sponsored hunters. In the wild only two percent of the gators will mature but at the park 98% will mature. Visitors to the park can hold a egg in their hands and watch the baby gator being hatched. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    A baby alligator merges from its egg shell as it is hatched at Gatorama's "Alligator Hatching Festival" Sunday, Aug. 19, 2012 near Palmdale, Fla. Gatorama officials said it was a very good year for eggs. The animal park got 3,233 alligator eggs from this year's harvest of more than 37,000 eggs gathered by state sponsored hunters. In the wild only two percent of the gators will mature but at the park 98% will mature. Visitors to the park can hold a egg in their hands and watch the baby gator being hatched. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    A turtle rides on an alligator's back at the Summit Garden Zoo in Panama City, Friday, Aug. 10, 2012. (AP Photo/Arnulfo Franco)

  • Awesome Gators & Crocs

    An aligator swims in the everglades waters at Holiday Park, Fla., Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2012. Holiday Park is an eco adventure park located on the edge of the Florida everglades that takes tourists on airboat rides. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)