Another poll in New York City confirms that Public Advocate Bill de Blasio has surged ahead of rivals and has a chance to win Tuesday's mayoral primary without having to compete in a run-off.

In a final NBC 4 New York/Wall Street Journal/Marist Poll released Sunday evening, de Blasio led the Democratic primary field with 36 percent, a double-digit lead over his nearest rivals that falls just short of the 40 percent threshold necessary to avoid a run-off. Former city comptroller Bill Thompson and city council speaker Christine Quinn were tied for second place at 20 percent. The other candidates -- former Rep. Anthony Weiner (D-N.Y.), city comptroller John Liu, former city council member Sal Albanese and pastor Erick Salgado -- were each beneath 10 percent.

"The surge is real," pollster Lee Miringoff told NBC New York. "Right now [de Blasio’s] within striking distance of 40 percent.”

De Blasio, who as the Wall Street Journal notes, "has staked out the most liberal ground" in the election, has a lead that spans racial and gender divisions. He held a 14-point lead among African Americans over Thompson, the only African American in the race, and a 13-point lead among women over Quinn, the only female candidate. He also led among both those voters who approved and who disapproved of Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s job performance.

He also won a majority of support over each of his closest rivals in two hypothetical run-offs, taking 56 percent to Quinn’s 34 percent, and 50 percent to Thompson’s 38 percent.

The Marist survey also asked voters about the tighter Democratic comptroller’s race, in which former Gov. Eliot Spitzer polled at 47 percent and Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer at 45 percent.

Marist’s previous polling has shown de Blasio with somewhat less support compared to his standing in other outlets’ surveys. Qunnipiac University, which put him at 43 percent last week, will release its final poll on the race on Monday morning.

The Marist poll surveyed 556 likely Democratic primary voters between Sept. 2 and 6, using live telephone interviews.

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  • Bill de Blasio

    Currently the city's Public Advocate, <a href="http://www.billdeblasio.com/" target="_blank">Bill de Blasio announced his bid for mayor in January 2013.</a> He has supported the paid sick leave bill,<a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/bill-de-blasio/humane-alternatives-for-h_b_821291.html" target="_blank"> banning horse-drawn carriages</a>, and has been fiercely <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/19/nyregion/19homeless.html" target="_blank">critical of Mayor Michael Bloomberg's homeless policies. </a>

  • Anthony Weiner

    Former Democratic congressman <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/22/anthony-weiner-2013-mayoral-race_n_3316704.html" target="_blank">Anthony Weiner finally announced his bid for mayor</a> in May after months of intense speculation by the media and politicians alike. In 2011, an embarrassing sexting scandal forced Weiner to resign from Congress. The lewd photos, along with his denial and subsequent admission, kept him out of the political spotlight until this spring.

  • John Liu

    As the city's current comptroller, <a href="http://johnliu2013.com/" target="_blank">John Liu</a> oversees New York City's finances. <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/25/comptroller-john-liu-ackn_n_1378211.html" target="_blank">Despite a federal investigation accusing two former aides to Liu of breaking campaign finance laws</a>, Liu announced his candidacy for mayor in March. In a recent interview, <a href="http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20130319/new-york-city/john-liu-says-all-democratic-mayoral-candidates-are-basically-same" target="_blank">Liu said, "We are all liberal Democrats"</a> and suggested Democratic mayoral hopefuls were all the same, differing on only a few issues such as stop and frisk. If elected, Liu would become the city's first Asian-American mayor.

  • Christine Quinn

    <a href="http://www.quinnfornewyork.com/announcement?splash=1" target="_blank">Christine Quinn</a> is the current City Council Speaker of New York City. She is said to be Mayor Michael Bloomberg's favorite candidate.

  • Bill Thompson

    From 2002-2009, <a href="http://billthompsonformayor.com/" target="_blank">Bill Thompson served as New York City's Comptroller. </a> Thompson, a Democrat, ran for mayor in 2009 against Bloomberg. He was outspent 14 to 1 by Bloomberg, and still only lost by a few percentage points.

  • Adolfo Carrion Jr.

    Adolfo Carrion, Jr. was the Bronx Borough President from 2002 to 2009 and was appointed by the Obama administration as the Regional Director for HUD's New York office. <a href="http://www.carrion2013.com/" target="_blank">He is running for mayor as an independent. </a>

  • Erick Salgado

    Staten Island's <a href="http://www.salgadonyc.com/" target="_blank">Rev. Erick Salgado </a>announced his Democratic candidacy for mayor, despite a socially <a href="http://politicker.com/2013/02/erick-salgados-odd-coalition/" target="_blank">conservative agenda</a> which includes anti-gay marriage, pro-life policies.

  • Sal Albanese

    <a href="http://www.salalbanese2013.com/" target="_blank">Sal Albanese</a> is a former city council member also hoping to win the Democratic primary. He also worked as a New York City public school teacher. <a href="http://www.capitalnewyork.com/article/politics/2012/12/6850576/former-brooklyn-councilman-sal-albanese-make-third-try-mayor" target="_blank">This will be his third bid for mayor of New York City. </a>

  • Joseph Lhota

    Before launching his GOP candidacy for mayor, <a href="https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&ved=0CDoQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fjoelhotaformayor.com%2F&ei=TOJ2UeXyAqT00QGe8oHYBA&usg=AFQjCNHVt6kspcgFB31wwgs6FO44kr2fSQ&bvm=bv.45580626,d.dmQ" target="_blank">Joseph Lhota</a> served as MTA chairman and served as the City’s Budget Director in Mayor Giuliani’s first term, and Deputy Mayor for Operations during the second. In 1999, he fought a public battle against the Brooklyn Museum to remove a portrait of the Virgin Mary containing elephant dung. <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/28/nyregion/for-lhota-mayoral-hopeful-who-lost-fight-to-remove-art-no-regrets.html?pagewanted=all" target="_blank">He lost. </a>

  • John Catsimatidis

    <a href="https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=3&cad=rja&ved=0CEcQFjAC&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.cats2013.com%2F&ei=SON2UaHQG6nq0gGq3oCoDw&usg=AFQjCNELoeyQyeiyb-RKgsBoAZmaMq38vA&bvm=bv.45580626,d.dmQ" target="_blank">John Catsimatidis </a>. a Republican candidate for mayor, is a billionaire supermarket mogul. He is known for his pro-NYPD policies and <a href="http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/mayoral_hopeful_john_catsimatidis_JtW3R5pgD1OwpRnbvWSuyM" target="_blank">supports the continuation of the department's controversial stop-and-frisk program. </a>

  • George McDonald

    <a href="https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=3&cad=rja&ved=0CEwQFjAC&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mcdonald2013.com%2F&ei=9uN2Ub7OAc-C0QGmooCQCA&usg=AFQjCNFKEjqwcjPtmMrF_o2C8pw_dLzGjA&bvm=bv.45580626,d.dmQ" target="_blank">George McDonald</a> is the founder and president of The Doe Fund, a non-profit that seeks to help homeless and formerly incarcerated individuals find work. He has never held public office. He initially identified himself as a Democrat but has since switched to the Republican party. McDonald has received criticism for trying to challenge <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/25/nyregion/george-t-mcdonald-ends-effort-t-o-sidestep-a-city-cap-in-mayors-race.html" target="_blank">campaign contribution limits. </a>

  • Anthony Weiner

    Former Democratic congressman <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/22/anthony-weiner-2013-mayoral-race_n_3316704.html" target="_blank">Anthony Weiner finally announced his bid for mayor</a> in May after months of intense speculation by the media and politicians alike. In 2011, an embarrassing sexting scandal forced Weiner to resign from Congress. The lewd photos, along with his denial and subsequent admission, have since dogged his political career, but a <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/28/anthony-weiner-nyc-mayor_n_3347673.html" target="_blank">recent poll revealed many New Yorkers were willing to forgive and forget</a>, with voters putting him at second only behind frontrunner Christine Quinn.