WASHINGTON -- On Oct. 8, Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) will argue to the Supreme Court that all campaign contribution limits should be eliminated and that candidates should be able to accept unlimited donations.

Although McConnell is not a party in the case of McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission, the Supreme Court has granted the Senate minority leader time during oral argument to present his views: that campaign contribution limits are an unconstitutional burden on free speech and that the court should give contribution limits a higher level of scrutiny than it has in the past. McConnell will be represented by lawyer Bobby Burchfield.

McCutcheon v. FEC challenges the aggregate limit on donations to federal candidates, political parties and political action committees, which bars an individual donor from giving more than $123,200 in total during the 2014 election cycle. McConnell wants to go much further by forcing courts to treat all campaign contribution limits as they treat campaign expenditure limits, which were found to be an unconstitutional burden on First Amendment rights in the 1976 Buckley v. Valeo decision.

The senator, a prominent opponent of campaign finance reforms, was the lead plaintiff 10 years ago in McConnell v. FEC, a Supreme Court challenge to the McCain-Feingold Act. Burchfield argued in that case as well.

The individual contribution limits that McConnell also wants to eliminate currently restrict a donor to giving $2,600 to a candidate for each of the primary and general elections. Absent these limits, people running for federal office could accept checks of the same size routinely donated to super PACs.

And some donors are willing to write very generous checks. The largest single check written to a super PAC in the 2012 election was $5 million. The largest total amount from one donor to one super PAC in that election came from Texas industrialist Harold Simmons, who gave $20.5 million to American Crossroads.

The Supreme Court may not agree with McConnell that all contribution limits should be overturned now, but the justices could still accept his argument that contribution limits should be treated with the same level of scrutiny as restrictions on campaign spending. Such a ruling would overturn precedent going back to Buckley v. Valeo and set the stage for a future case to eliminate all such limits, according to Campaign Legal Center President Trevor Potter.

"While this request sounds legalistic in nature, if the plaintiffs and Senator McConnell are successful in convincing five Justices of this argument, then not only will the Court strike down the current aggregate contribution limits, but in the future it will be much easier for those seeking to remove all contribution limits and allow unlimited contributions to candidates and parties to challenge any contribution limit in court," Potter wrote on the center's blog.

McConnell's arguments will likely find a receptive ear among some of the conservative members of the court. Justices Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy and Clarence Thomas have all said that the distinction between contributions and expenditures is wrong and that the court should find contribution limits to be a violation of free speech rights. The views of the court's two other conservatives, Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Samuel Alito, are less clear.

"The time has come for the Court to revisit the distinction [between contributions and expenditures]," the amicus brief submitted by McConnell declares.

The brief argues that contribution limits restrict the First Amendment rights of speech and association for both contributors and recipients of campaign cash.

Contributors' free speech rights are restricted, according to McConnell, because "for many if not most persons," a campaign contribution is "by far the most effective means of supporting a preferred candidate" and monetary limits prevent a person from demonstrating the true intensity of his or her support in the way that someone volunteering time to a campaign can volunteer unlimited time. The recipients of that money also have their rights restricted because contributions "directly enable speech" and because they have a right to associate with contributors "at varying levels of intensity."

Supporters of contribution limits contend that the fact that the justices will hear McConnell's broader attack on campaign regulation gives credence to their arguments that the McCutcheon case is simply a Trojan horse for the future gutting of all contribution limits.

"This is a not very thinly disguised first step to try to get an absolute anything goes-no limits regime on campaign contributions," Charles Fried, a former solicitor general under President Ronald Reagan and author of an amicus brief submitted by Americans for Campaign Reform, earlier told The Huffington Post.

Also on HuffPost:

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  • Thomas Steyer: $20.8 Million

    Thomas Steyer, former head of the San Francisco-based hedge fund Farallon Capital, has given $20,753,000 to super PACs in the 2014 election. A staunch environmentalist, Steyer has donated $20,253,000 to the super PAC he founded to help elect more lawmakers who support action on climate change. Steyer also gave $500,000 to Senate Majority PAC. CE Action Committee (formerly NextGen Committee) spent millions in 2013 to support Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.) in his successful special election bid and to help Democrat Terry McAuliffe win the Virginia governorship. Steyer told Bloomberg Businessweek that he wants to push climate change into election conversations in 2014 and beyond. "If you look at the 2012 campaign, climate change was like incest -- something you couldn't talk about in polite company," he said. Steyer was not a super PAC donor in the 2012 election.

  • Michael Bloomberg: $9.4 Million

    Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg has donated $9,421,679 to super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. He contributed more than $6.1 million to Independence USA PAC, his own group; $2.5 million to Senate Majority PAC, which supports Democratic Senate candidates; $250,000 to Mississippi Conservatives, which supported Sen. Thad Cochran (R-Miss.); $250,000 to West Main Street Values, supporting Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.); and $100,000 to Americans for Responsible Solutions, the pro-gun control super PAC founded by former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.). In 2013, Independence USA PAC spent big to support pro-gun control candidates in the special election for Illinois' 2nd Congressional District and in both the Virginia gubernatorial and attorney general races. In all three elections, the candidate supported by Bloomberg won.

  • Democratic Governors Association: $8.1 Million

    The Democratic Governors Association gave $8,129,625 to its own super PAC, DGA Action, in the 2014 election cycle. The group spends large sums on advertising and ground support for Democratic gubernatorial candidates across the country. In 2013, much of its spending went toward helping Democrat Terry McAuliffe win the Virginia governor's race. <em>Pictured: DGA Chairman and Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin</em>

  • National Education Association: $6.3 Million

    The National Education Association has contributed $6,334,050 to super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. The union and its affiliated groups gave $5.3 million to its own super PAC, NEA Advocacy Fund; $550,000 to America Votes Action Fund; $175,000 to DGA Action; $100,000 to Senate Majority PAC; $100,000 to American Bridge 21st Century; $79,000 to Working for Us; $16,250 to Patriot Majority PAC; $5,000 to House Majority PAC; $5,000 to Americans for Responsible Solutions; and $3,800 to America Votes Action Fund.

  • Fred Eychaner: $5.6 Million

    Media mogul and LGBT activist donor Fred Eychaner has given $5,650,000 million to super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. Eychaner, a major Democratic donor in recent elections, gave $4 million to Senate Majority PAC, $1.5 million to House Majority PAC, and $150,000 to Battleground Texas.

  • AFL-CIO: $5.4 Million

    The AFL-CIO, the largest federation of labor unions with more than 11 million members, gave $5,375,000 in the 2014 election cycle: $5.35 million to its own Workers' Voice super PAC and $25,000 to House Majority PAC. <em>Pictured: AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka</em>

  • United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners: $5.4 Million

    The United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners gave $5,356,662 to Working for Working Americans, a pro-labor super PAC. The 130-year-old union is funded by dues paid by its half-million members.

  • Paul Singer: $4.8 Million

    Elliott Management CEO Paul Singer contributed $4,837,252 to super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. Singer is a backer of conservative economic policies and a neoconservative foreign policy, but also supports gay marriage. He runs his own super PAC, American Unity, to back pro-gay marriage Republican candidates. Singer gave $1,912,252 to American Unity; $1.25 million to American Crossroads; $650,000 to Ending Spending Action Fund; $100,000 to USA Super PAC; $100,000 to New York 2014; $50,000 to Campaign for Jobs and Accountability; and $25,000 to John Bolton Super PAC.

  • Senate Majority PAC: $4.2 Million

    Senate Majority PAC, a super PAC backing Democratic candidates, gave $4,170,793 to Put Alaska First, a super PAC supporting the re-election of Sen. Mark Begich (D-Alaska). <em>Pictured: Sen. Mark Begich</em>

  • National Association of Realtors: $4.1 Million

    The National Association of Realtors contributed $4,140,840 to its own super PAC in the 2014 election cycle.

  • Richard Uihlein: $3.7 Million

    Richard Uihlein, the CEO of U-Line Corporation, gave $3,715,000 to conservative super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. The hardline conservative contributed $1,780,000 to Liberty Principles PAC, $500,000 to Club for Growth Action, $500,000 to Our America Fund, $450,000 to America's PAC, $400,000 to Senate Conservatives Action, $75,000 to Madison Action Fund, and $10,000 to Empower Nebraska.

  • AFSCME: $3.1 Million

    The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees gave $3,133,250 to super PACs in the current cycle. The public employees union contributed $1.15 million to the AFL-CIO's Workers' Voice super PAC, $500,000 to Senate Majority PAC, $400,000 to House Majority PAC, $262,000 to America Votes Action Fund, $200,000 to American Bridge 21st Century, $175,000 to Women Vote!, $105,000 to Battleground Texas, $100,000 to American Working Families, $100,000 to NextGen Climate Action Committee, $50,000 to Working Families for Hawaii, $40,000 to WIN Minnesota Federal PAC, $29,000 to Working for Us, $16,250 to Patriot Majority PAC, $5,000 to the Gay and Lesbian Victory Fund, and $1,000 to America Votes Action Fund. <em>Pictured: AFSCME Secretary-General Lee Saunders</em>

  • Robert Mercer: $3 Million

    Renaissance Technologies hedge fund executive Robert Mercer, a hardline conservative donor, gave $3,020,000 to super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. Mercer contributed $1 million to John Bolton Super PAC, $900,000 to Club for Growth Action, $350,000 to American Heartland PAC, $250,000 to Senate Conservatives Action, $200,000 to US Jobs Council, $120,000 to Special Operations for America, $100,000 to USA Super PAC, and $100,000 to New York 2014.

  • United Steelworkers: $2.8 Million

    The United Steelworkers gave $2,774,387 to USW Works, its own super PAC, in the 2014 election cycle. <em>Pictured: United Steelworkers President Leo Gerard</em>

  • Republican Governors Association: $2.7 Million

    The Republican Governors Association contributed $2.7 million to its affiliated super PAC, RGA Right Direction, in the 2014 election cycle. <em>Pictured: RGA Chairman and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie</em>

  • John Jordan: $2.3 Million

    California vintner Thomas John Jordan has given $2,285,000 to super PACs in the 2014 election. He started by giving to Americans for Progressive Action, a super PAC that supported Republican candidate Gabriel Gomez in the Massachusetts special Senate election in 2013. Gomez lost the race to now-Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.). Jordan told The Wall Street Journal, "I just couldn't sit by and watch and leave [Gomez] alone while the establishment Republican groups decided to sit on their hands and just leave him on the beach. I just couldn't do that." Jordan has also given $585,000 to New Republican.org.

  • Ronald Firman: $2.1 Million

    Miami retiree Ronald Firman contributed $2,145,000 to super PACs in the 2014 election. Nearly all of Firman's contributions went toward super PACs supporting the special election primary campaign of Republican Paige Kreegel, a former Florida state lawmaker. Kreegel was running to fill the seat vacated by U.S. Rep. Trey Radel (R) after his arrest for cocaine possession. Firman gave $2,144,000 to super PACs supporting Kreegel, but he still lost. Firman also gave $1,000 to American Crossroads. <em>Pictured: Paige Kreegel, the candidate supported by Firman's contributions</em>

  • Working for Working Americans: $2.1 Million

    Working for Working Americans, the super PAC funded by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners, contributed $2,125,000 to other super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. The group gave $1,250,000 to Senate Majority PAC, $500,000 to House Majority PAC, $250,000 to Defending Main Street SuperPAC, $100,000 to WIN Minnesota Federal PAC, and $25,000 to American Working Families. <em>Pictured: Members of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners</em>

  • Cooperative of American Physicians: $2 Million

    The Cooperative of American Physicians, a membership organization through which California doctors purchase medical liability insurance, gave $2,004,773 to its own super PAC. The latter group supports candidates who back liability insurance reform, specifically the institution of caps on lawsuit damages, and other legislation to make it more difficult to sue doctors. In the 2012 election, the super PAC backed both Republican and Democratic candidates.

  • Jerrold Perenchio: $2 Million

    Jerrold Perenchio, the former CEO and chairman of Univision and a major Republican Party donor, contributed $2 million to American Crossroads in the 2014 election cycle.

  • Laborers' International Union: $1.8 Million

    The Laborers' International Union gave $1,832,800 to super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. The construction workers union and its associated groups contributed $700,000 to Senate Majority PAC, $525,000 to House Majority PAC, $250,000 to Defending Main Street SuperPAC, $250,000 to American Working Families, $50,000 to WIN Minnesota Federal PAC, $50,000 to The Ninety-Nine Percent, and $7,800 to South Forward IE PAC. <em>Pictured: Laborers' International Union President Terrence O'Sullivan</em>

  • Jon Stryker: $1.8 Million

    Jon Stryker, heir to the Stryker Corporation fortune and an LGBT activist, gave $1,825,000 to super PACs supporting Democratic candidates in the 2014 cycle. Stryker's contributions came from himself and from Greenleaf Trust, a wealth management firm founded by his family. Stryker contributed $1.2 million to House Majority PAC, $400,000 to Senate Majority PAC, $100,000 to American Bridge 21st Century, and $25,000 to Ready for Hillary.

  • Virginia James: $1.8 Million

    Investor Virginia James, a board member of the Club for Growth, contributed $1.8 million to conservative super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. She gave $1.5 million to Club for Growth Action, $200,000 to Women Speak Out PAC, and $100,000 to American Commitment Action Fund. <em>Pictured: Club for Growth, a major recipient of James' contributions</em>

  • United Association: $1.7 Million

    The United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the Plumbing and Pipe Fitting Industry contributed $1,705,500 to super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. The union and its affiliated groups gave $1 million to House Majority PAC, $505,500 to Senate Majority PAC, and $200,000 to Workers' Voice.

  • Seth Klarman: $1.7 Million

    Seth Klarman, hedge fund executive and supporter of a neoconservative foreign policy, gave $1.7 million to super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. Klarman contributed $1 million to American Unity, $450,000 to Ending Spending Action Fund, $100,000 to the Mobilization Project, $100,000 to the End Gridlock Committee, and $50,000 to New Majority for Massachusetts.

  • Jobs and Progress Fund: $1.7 Million

    Jobs and Progress Fund, a dark money nonprofit, gave $1,685,000 to Citizens for a Working America PAC, a super PAC supporting Georgia Republican Senate candidate David Perdue. The group is tied to political operatives in Ohio and does not disclose the original source of its funds.

  • Warren Stephens: $1.6 Million

    Warren Stephens, CEO of Stephens Inc., gave $1,620,000 to super PACs supporting Republicans in the 2014 election cycle. Stephens contributed $750,000 to American Crossroads, $500,000 to John Bolton Super PAC, $200,000 to Kentuckians for Strong Leadership, $125,000 to Mississippi Conservatives, $25,000 to We Can Do Better PAC, and $20,000 to American Jobs Council Federal Political Action.

  • Joe and Marlene Ricketts: $1.6 Million

    TD Ameritrade founder and conservative donor Joe Ricketts and his wife, Marlene Ricketts, gave $1,550,000 to Ending Spending Action Fund, the super PAC founded by Joe Ricketts, in the 2014 election cycle. Marlene Ricketts also gave $25,000 to the Campaign for Jobs and Opportunity.

  • Joseph Craft: $1.5 Million

    Joseph Craft III, head of the coal company Alliance Resource Partners, contributed $1,525,000 to super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. Craft gave $1 million to American Crossroads, $300,000 to Ending Spending Action Fund, $200,000 to Kentuckians for Strong Leadership, and $25,000 to USA Super PAC.

  • Jonathan Soros: $1.5 Million

    Jonathan Soros, investor and son of the billionaire investor and Democratic donor George Soros, gave $1,505,000 to super PACs in 2014. He donated $1,505,000 to the super PAC he helped found, Friends of Democracy. The group works to enact campaign finance reform at the state and federal levels, in part by electing or defeating particular candidates. Friends of Democracy spent most of its money in 2013 to help fund a massive effort to enact reform legislation in New York state. Despite support from the majority of citizens and nearly every Democratic leader in the state, including Gov. Andrew Cuomo, the legislation died in the state Senate. Soros has also given $10,000 to Mayday PAC and $5,000 to Americans for Responsible Solutions.

  • Government Integrity Fund: $1.5 Million

    Government Integrity Fund, a dark money nonprofit, has given $1,465,000 to super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. The Ohio-based group contributed $1,055,000 to its own super PAC, Government Integrity Fund Action Network, which is supporting the Senate campaign of Rep. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.), and $410,000 to Citizens for a Working America PAC, supporting Georgia Republican David Perdue's Senate primary campaign. <em>Pictured: Rep. Tom Cotton, a candidate supported by the Government Integrity Fund's super PAC contributions</em>

  • Steve Mostyn, Amber Mostyn and Mostyn Law Firm: $1.4 Million

    Texas trial lawyer and Democratic donor Steve Mostyn, through his Mostyn Law Firm, and his wife, Amber Mostyn, gave $1,392,500 to super PACs in 2013. The Mostyns, who emerged as major national donors in the 2012 election, gave $750,000 to Americans for Responsible Solutions, $255,000 to Battleground Texas, $250,000 to Planned Parenthood Votes, $100,000 to House Majority PAC, $25,000 to Ready for Hillary, and $12,500 to Texans for America's Future.

  • American Federation of Teachers: $1.4 Million

    The American Federation of Teachers contributed $1.4 million to super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. The teachers union and its affiliated groups gave $500,000 to House Majority PAC, $350,000 to Senate Majority PAC, $250,000 to Workers' Voice, $150,000 to Women Vote!, $100,000 to American Bridge 21st Century, and $50,000 to WIN Minnesota Federal PAC. <em>Pictured: AFT President Randi Weingarten</em>

  • Anne Earhart: $1.3 Million

    Getty oil heir Anne Earhart contributed $1,350,000 to super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. Earhart gave $800,000 to American Bridge 21st Century, $250,000 to Senate Majority PAC, $200,000 to House Majority PAC, and $100,000 to Planned Parenthood Votes.

  • Angelo Tsakopoulos: $1.3 Million

    California real estate developer Angelo Tsakopoulos gave $1,347,000 to a super PAC supporting his son-in-law George Demos, who was running for the Republican nomination in a New York House race. Demos lost the primary. Tsakopoulos' contribution stands out as he is a regular backer of Democrats, not Republicans.

  • George Soros: $1.3 Million

    Billionaire investor George Soros contributed $1,280,000 to super PACs supporting Democratic candidates in the 2014 election cycle. Soros gave $1 million to American Bridge 21st Century, $250,000 to SOS for Democracy, $25,000 to Ready for Hillary, and $5,000 to Friends of Democracy.

  • S. Donald Sussman: $1.3 Million

    S. Donald Sussman, hedge fund executive and husband to Rep. Chellie Pingree (D-Maine), contributed $1,275,000 to super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. Sussman has given $1.1 million to House Majority PAC, $150,000 to Women Vote!, $25,000 to Ready for Hillary, and $25,000 to LCV Victory Fund. <em>Pictured: Donald Sussman (second from left) with his wife, Rep. Chellie Pingree (second from right)</em>

  • Amy Goldman Fowler: $1.2 Million

    Amy Goldman Fowler contributed $1.2 million to super PACs supporting Democrats in the 2014 election cycle. She gave $500,000 to American Bridge 21st Century, $500,000 to Planned Parenthood Votes, $100,000 to Senate Majority PAC, and $100,000 to House Majority PAC.

  • Harold Simmons: $1.2 Million

    Before his death on Dec. 28, 2013, Texas industrialist Harold Simmons, in his own name and through his company Contran Corporation, gave $1.2 million to super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. Simmons, who had been the second biggest super PAC donor in 2012, gave $1 million to American Crossroads and $200,000 to Congressional Leadership Fund last year.

  • John Childs: $1.2 Million

    Investor John Childs contributed $1,165,000 to super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. Childs gave $500,000 to Club for Growth Action, $290,000 to Kentuckians for Strong Leadership, $200,000 to American Crossroads, $125,000 to Congressional Leadership Fund, and $50,000 to YG Action Fund.

  • American Bridge 21st Century/Foundation: $1.1 Million

    The Democratic super PAC American Bridge 21st Century and its nonprofit arm, American Bridge 21st Century Foundation, combined to give $1,139,835 to super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. The majority of this money -- $1,104,687 -- was in the form of staff payments by the nonprofit to the super PAC. The super PAC also gave $35,000 to Senate Majority PAC and $148 to the Jewish Council for Education and Research.

  • National Air Traffic Controllers Association: $1.1 Million

    The National Air Traffic Controllers Association has given $1,123,879 to super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. The union has given $500,000 to Senate Majority PAC, $250,000 to Virginia Progress, $200,000 to House Majority PAC, $100,000 to Defending Main Street SuperPAC, $50,000 to Congressional Leadership Fund, $22,879 to Workers' Voice, and $1,000 to Value in Electing Women PAC. <em>Pictured: NATCA President Paul Rinaldi</em>

  • International Union of Operating Engineers: $1.1 Million

    The International Union of Operating Engineers contributed $1,123,000 to super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. The union and its associated groups donated $350,000 to House Majority PAC, $305,000 to Senate Majority PAC, $250,000 to Defending Main Street SuperPAC, $75,000 to American Working Families, $60,000 to Workers' Voice, $25,000 to The Ninety-Nine Percent, and $8,000 to Lunch Pail Republicans IE-Only Committee. <em>Pictured: IUOE members protest in California</em>

  • Priorities USA Action: $1.1 Million

    Priorities USA Action, the super PAC formed to support President Barack Obama's re-election in 2012, gave $1.1 million to other super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. The super PAC contributed $500,000 to House Majority PAC, $500,000 to Senate Majority PAC, and $100,000 to Planned Parenthood Votes.

  • Bob Perry: $1.1 Million

    Before his death in April 2013, GOP mega-donor Bob Perry gave $1.1 million to super PACs, including $1 million to Senate Conservatives Action and $100,000 to Kentuckians for Strong Leadership. Perry had been one of the top donors to Republican independent groups over the last decade. He was a major funder of the 2004 Swift Boat Veterans for Truth effort and was the third biggest donor to super PACs in the 2012 election, giving $23.45 million.

  • Sean Fieler: $1 Million

    Hedge fund manager Sean Fieler, a conservative Catholic, gave $1,043,724 to super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. Fieler contributed $938,724 to American Principles Fund, $100,000 to American Commitment Action Fund, and $5,000 to ActRight.

  • David Bonderman and Laurie Michaels: $1 Million

    Private equity executive David Bonderman and his wife, Laurie Michaels, have given $1,040,000 to super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. Bonderman donated $195,000 to Senate Majority PAC, $125,000 to American Bridge 21st Century, $75,000 to Virginia Progress, and $30,000 to Defending Main Street SuperPAC. Michaels contributed $340,000 to Senate Majority PAC and $275,000 to Women Vote!

  • International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers: $1 Million

    The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers contributed $1,035,500 to super PACs in the 2014 election cycle. The union gave $755,000 to House Majority PAC, $255,500 to Senate Majority PAC, and $25,000 to Antelope Valley Taxpayers Association. <em>Pictured: Sen. Mark Begich (D-Alaska) speaks before an IBEW local</em>

  • Kenneth Griffin: $1 Million

    Citadel hedge fund CEO Kenneth Griffin has given $1,025,000 to super PACs in 2014. Griffin contributed $300,000 to Ending Spending Action Fund, $250,000 to American Crossroads, $150,000 to AmericaRisingPAC.org, $150,000 to New York 2014, $100,000 to USA Super PAC, $50,000 to Kentuckians for Strong Leadership, and $25,000 to Campaign for Jobs and Opportunity.

  • Carolyn Oliver: $1 Million

    Carolyn Oliver, a doctor and lawyer based in Austin, Texas, contributed $1 million to Battleground Texas, a super PAC working to increase the strength of the Democratic Party in the Lone Star State. Oliver is a passionate supporter of Texas state Sen. Wendy Davis (D), who is running for governor. She also donated $1 million directly to Davis' campaign.

  • David and Mary Boies: $1 Million

    Lawyer David Boies and his wife, Mary Boies, combined to contribute $1 million to super PACs supporting Democrats in the 2014 election cycle. They donated $500,000 to Senate Majority PAC and $500,000 to House Majority PAC.