Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshel won the 2013 Nobel Prize For Chemistry on Wednesday "for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems."

Because chemical reactions occur so quickly, they're often difficult for scientists to see and understand. In the 1970s, the Nobel laureates laid the foundation for programs that make it possible to map the mysterious ways of chemistry by using computers.

Karplus, an American and Austrian citizen, is affiliated with the Universite de Strasbourg in France and Harvard University. Levitt, an American, British and Israeli citizen, is a professor of cancer research at Stanford. And Warshel, an American and Israeli citizen, is a distinguished professor at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles.

The prize, which is awarded by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, is given to those "who shall have made the most important chemical discovery or improvement."

More from the Associated Press:

STOCKHOLM (AP) — Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshel won this year's Nobel Prize in chemistry on Wednesday for laying the foundation for the computer models used to understand and predict chemical processes.

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said their research in the 1970s has helped scientists develop programs that unveil chemical processes such as the purification of exhaust fumes or the photosynthesis in green leaves.

"The work of Karplus, Levitt and Warshel is ground-breaking in that they managed to make Newton's classical physics work side-by-side with the fundamentally different quantum physics," the academy said. "Previously, chemists had to choose to use either/or."

Karplus, a U.S. and Austrian citizen, is affiliated with the University of Strasbourg, France, and Harvard University. The academy said Levitt is a British, U.S., and Israeli citizen and a professor at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Warshel is a U.S. and Israeli citizen affiliated with the University of Southern California in Los Angeles.

Warshel told a news conference in Stockholm by telephone that he was "extremely happy" to be awakened in the middle of the night in Los Angeles to find out he had won the prize and looks forward to collecting the award in the Swedish capital in December.

"In short what we developed is a way which requires computers to look, to take the structure of the protein and then to eventually understand how exactly it does what it does," Warshel said.

Earlier this week, three Americans won the Nobel Prize in medicine for discoveries about how key substances are moved around within cells and the physics award went to British and Belgian scientists whose theories help explain how matter formed after the Big Bang.


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