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Teens In 1964 Photo Taken By Ringo Starr Reunited After 49 Years

10/28/2013 01:50 pm ET

The magical mystery surrounding a group of teenagers photographed by Ringo Starr in 1964 has been solved.

Last week, with the help of USA Today, the former Beatles drummer began a nationwide search for the six teenagers in a photograph Starr snapped during the band's first visit to the United States in 1964. "They’re looking at us, and I’m photographing them," Starr wrote of the encounter in "Photograph," a book of photos from around the world taken by Starr throughout his career. ("Photograph" is due out Nov. 22.)

While Starr thought he may have taken the picture after the group touched down in Miami on Feb. 13, 1964, the photograph was taken days before, on Feb. 7, 1964, in New York, near John F. Kennedy International Airport,

"We went back up to the front [of the limousine line], waved to each one of them, and the last one was Ringo, he's the one who went, 'Roll down your window!'" Gary Van Deursen, who was driving the car (a borrowed Chevy Impala) told the "TODAY" show on Monday. The other passengers in the car included Suzanne Rayot, Arlene Norbe, Charlie Schwartz, Bob Toth and Matt Blender. (Blender, who is glimpsed in the back right of the photograph, passed away in 2011.) The six then-teenagers all attended Fair Lawn High School in New Jersey.

For his part, Starr is pleased that the reunion happened. "How great that they found these people! And how cool to now know a little of their story and what that moment was like from their perspective," Starr said in a statement to "TODAY." "Right now I'm off in Latin America on tour and I won't be back until November when we play two shows at the Palms in Las Vegas. I look forward to meeting them when I get back. See you in Las Vegas! Peace & love, Ringo."

Check out the original photo, and a before and after comparison, below. More on the 1964 photograph can be found in the video above.

ringo starr

ringo star photo

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