Two Bahraini princes, Nasser and Khalid bin Hamad Al Khalifa are currently training in Florida for the upcoming Ironman competition, which takes place on Saturday. Bahraini human rights organizations have accused both men of serious human rights offenses. Rachel Burke Peterson, Director of Communications at Americans for Democracy and Human Rights in Bahrain, joined HuffPost Live’s Ahmed Shihab-Eldin to discuss whether or not the US government and the Ironman competition should take action in order to address the alleged human rights violations.

Following the advent of the Arab Spring in Tunisia, pro-democracy protests erupted across Bahrain in the winter of 2011. The ruling regime responded with an immediate crackdown, deploying a strong security force.

The Bahrain Forum for Human Rights reports that both Nasser and Khalid Khalifa were responsible for the torture of several pro-democracy protesters. Further, the European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights has reported that "Following [Nasser Khalifa’s] directives more than 150 professional athletes, coaches and referees were subjected to arbitrary arrests, night raids, detention, abuse and torture by electric cables and other means.”

Peterson said that the Ironman organization should address these reports and hold the Khalifa brothers accountable for any human rights abuses.

“Our main concern is that to allow them to participate in the Ironman competition… it sets a precedent,” she said, “that…those that commit human rights abuses are no longer going to be held to standards that we would consider to be international.”

While Peterson expressed frustration with the lack of reportage on this story, she feels that overall the US government is increasingly willing to censure Bahrain for human rights crimes.

“We are seeing a turn in the US narrative towards Bahrain and our hope is that [this turn] will [continue to] strengthen,” she said, “and that the United States’ government as well as other leaders throughout the world can encourage the government of Bahrain to stop its human rights violations, to end the culture of impunity, and to listen to their citizens’ demands.”

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  • An Asian man rides his bicycle past graffiti on a wall urging a boycott of the April 21 Formula One Bahrain Grand Prix with an image of Crown Prince Salman Al Khalifa in a racing car in Bar Bar, Bahrain, Monday, April 8, 2013. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)

  • Foreign laborers collect equipment they left behind against a wall sprayed with graffiti against holding the upcoming Formula One Grand Prix in Bahrain in the village of Barbar, west of the capital Manama, on March 31, 2013. (MOHAMMED AL-SHAIKH/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A Bahraini anti-government protester sprays graffiti opposing the upcoming Formula One Bahrain Grand Prix during a march in A'ali, Bahrain, on Friday, April 12, 2013. It reads: "no to Formula" next to F1 being crossed out. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)

  • Bahraini anti-government protesters carry national flags and posters of jailed political and human rights leaders during a march in A'ali, Bahrain, on Friday, April 12, 2013. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)

  • Bahraini anti-government protesters gather for a march in A'ali, Bahrain, on Friday, April 12, 2013. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)

  • Bahraini women spray anti-government graffiti during a march in A'ali, Bahrain, on Friday, April 12, 2013. Old political graffiti includes "steadfast." (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)

  • Bahraini anti-government protesters, including a masked boy carrying a national flag, gather for a march in A'ali, Bahrain, on Friday, April 12, 2013. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)

  • Bahraini anti-government protesters carry national flags, posters of jailed political and human rights leaders and images of people who have been jailed or died in the 2-year-old uprising during a march in A'ali, Bahrain, on Friday, April 12, 2013. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)

  • A Bahraini anti-government protester prepares to throw a petrol bomb at riot police during clashes following a rally protesting against the upcoming Formula One race in Sanabis, Bahrain, Tuesday, April 9, 2013. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)

  • A Bahraini anti-government protester holds projectiles during clashes with riot police in Daih, Bahrain, Tuesday, April 9, 2013. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)

  • A Bahraini riot police officer walks toward a row of burning tires set alight by Bahraini anti-government protesters on a street in Sehla, Bahrain, Tuesday, April 9, 2013. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)

  • Bahrainis hold placards in solidarity with jailed political activists and against the upcoming Bahrain Formula One Grand Prix which will take in Manama on April 21, during a protest in Sanabis, west of Manama, on April 9, 2013. (MOHAMMED AL-SHAIKH/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Bahrainis hold placards in solidarity with jailed political activists and against the upcoming Bahrain Formula One Grand Prix which will take in Manama on April 21, during a protest in Sanabis, west of Manama, on April 9, 2013. (MOHAMMED AL-SHAIKH/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Bahraini anti-government protesters run from riot police near a bus stop painted in national colors with graffiti with Arabic that reads, "Down Hamad," referring to Bahrain's king, in Malkiya, Bahrain, Sunday, March 31, 2013. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)

  • Bahraini anti-government protesters run from riot police throwing stun grenades, unseen, in Malkiya, Bahrain, Sunday, March 31, 2013. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)

  • Bahraini anti-government protesters shout slogans and gesture toward riot police, unseen, in the main market area of the capital of Manama, Bahrain, on Friday, March 29, 2013. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)

  • Bahraini anti-government protesters run from police and gesture during one of several flash protests throughout the day in the main market area of the capital of Manama, Bahrain, on Friday, March 29, 2013. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)

  • Bahraini women hold on to a young anti-government protester as police attempt to arrest him during protests in the main market area of the capital of Manama, Bahrain, on Friday, March 29, 2013. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)

  • A Bahraini boy and his father react to tear gas fired by riot police to disperse anti-government protesters in the main market area in the capital of Manama, Bahrain, on Friday, March 29, 2013. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)

  • Bahraini women shout slogans as they march during an anti-regime rally in solidarity with jailed human rights activist Nabeel Rajab and against the upcoming Bahrain Formula One Grand Prix in Manama on March 29, 2013. (MOHAMMED AL-SHAIKH/AFP/Getty Images)

  • An arrested Bahraini boy is surrounded by riot police during an anti-regime rally in solidarity with jailed human rights activist Nabeel Rajab and against the upcoming Bahrain Formula One Grand Prix in Manama on March 29, 2013. (MOHAMMED AL-SHAIKH/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A Bahraini protester shouts slogans while holding a poster of jailed human rights activist Nabeel Rajab during an anti-regime protest in solidarity with Rajab and against the upcoming Bahrain Formula One Grand Prix in Manama on March 29, 2013. (MOHAMMED AL-SHAIKH/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Bahraini women shout slogans as they march during an anti-regime rally in solidarity with jailed human rights activist Nabeel Rajab and against the upcoming Bahrain Formula One Grand Prix in Manama on March 29, 2013. (MOHAMMED AL-SHAIKH/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A Bahraini anti-government protester holds up a picture of jailed opposition human rights activist Zainab al-Khawaja as she participates in a prayer for al-Khawaja's freedom after a march in Malkiya, Bahrain, on Thursday, March 28, 2013. The sign reads: "freedom for rights activist Zainab al-Khawaja." (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)

  • A Bahraini anti-government protester kicks at tear gas canisters fired by riot police in Sitra, Bahrain, on Wednesday, March 27, 2013. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)