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Olivet Middle School Football Players Create Secret Play For Teammate With Disabilities

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Jocks don't have a reputation for always being nice to the little guy. But this middle school football team went above and beyond for a teammate, and their plan to lift up a student with behavioral and learning disabilities is an amazing example of kids' kindness.

For weeks this season, the Olivet, Mich. team conspired behind the back of their coach to come up with a secret play, according to a report from CBS News. When one player surprisingly went down at the one-yard-line during a game, fans groaned, according to WILX-TV.

But it was all on purpose. It set the stage for their next play, which gave teammate Keith Orr the chance to score his first touchdown. You can barely see it in the video, because his team is crowded around to protect him.

Watch the CBS video above to see how happy it made Keith and his parents -- and how it changed the whole team.

And why did they do it?

"It's just like to make someone's day, make someone's week, just make them happy," player Justice Miller told CBS.

They call the play the "Keith Special," WILX reports. Kids really can be pretty remarkable.

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