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Liz Cheney: The Republican Party Is Heading In A 'Dangerous' Direction On Foreign Policy

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CHEYENNE, WY - JULY 17:  Wyoming Senate candidate Liz Cheney answers a question from a reporter at a news conference in the Little America Hotel and Resort in Cheyenne, Wyoming on July 17, 2013. Cheney, the daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney, will run against longtime incumbent Sen. Mike Enzi (R-WY). Cheney launched her campaign yesterday following Enzi's announcement that he will run for a fourth term.  (Photo by Marc Piscotty/Getty Images)
CHEYENNE, WY - JULY 17: Wyoming Senate candidate Liz Cheney answers a question from a reporter at a news conference in the Little America Hotel and Resort in Cheyenne, Wyoming on July 17, 2013. Cheney, the daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney, will run against longtime incumbent Sen. Mike Enzi (R-WY). Cheney launched her campaign yesterday following Enzi's announcement that he will run for a fourth term. (Photo by Marc Piscotty/Getty Images)

Days before Liz Cheney sparred with her sister over gay marriage, the Wyoming Senate candidate lamented a separate issue that could be "dangerous" for the Republican Party.

In a Nov. 12 Q&A with TIME published on Thursday, Cheney was asked about a variety of topics, from how the GOP handled its attempts to defund Obamacare, to differences between her and incumbent Sen. Mike Enzi (R-Wyo.).

The question that appeared to strike a strong chord was on foreign policy -- specifically if the GOP was veering away from tactics long supported by her and her father, former Vice President Dick Cheney.

TIME: The Republican Party is turning away from the brand of foreign policy that you and your father have long espoused. Is that a danger for the Republican Party?

Cheney: I think that yes, it is dangerous. I think isolationism is a mistake, no matter what party you see it in. We have to remember that there are two threats to our freedom: there’s a threat that comes from the federal government, from the Obama Administration policies..but there’s also a huge and significant threat from al-Qaeda. The war on terror is still underway. Al-Qaeda is stronger today than it’s been in many years. We have to be able to protect our freedom from both of those threats.

When asked who she would model if elected to the Senate, Cheney vowed to be her own person, choosing not to mention any current senators. She instead credited retired Sens. Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.) and Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) as "people who stood for what they believed in no matter the criticism that came."

A week and a half ago, Cheney gave a similar answer when asked "are you a tea party candidate?" She did not say "yes," but called herself "supporter" of the movement's "important service."

"They've really sent a message that the people we elect need to make sure they remember that they work for the people who sent them to Washington," Cheney told KGWN-TV. "And so I think the tea party has done a lot of good for us."

For the full Q&A with Cheney, head over to TIME.

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