BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — Argentina's broadcast media regulator has new rules for television news: From now own, subtitles must be added to video showing where and when it was recorded.

Audiovisual authority President Martin Sabbatella says failure to identify the place and time of events shown on TV news "is especially serious when it involves violence, protests, tragedies or problems in public spaces." He says viewers should know if the trouble is happening now where they live, or is already over somewhere else.

The new rules require old news video to be clearly labeled "archive." Live shots must identify the location, and video recorded earlier the same day must include the hour.

Free press advocate Claudio Paolillo has no problem with the new rules. He says clearly identifying content is simply good journalism.

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  • In this Friday Nov. 15, 2013 photo, passengers stand on a crowded train heading to Once station in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Riding the commuter trains around Argentina’s capital can make for a dismal, sweaty trip on cars that mostly date back to the mid-1960s. Safety is a going concern among commuters: One train slammed into a downtown station last year, killing 51 people and pushing the government to take over direct operation of the trains from private companies. Then a crash in June killed three people. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

  • In this Friday Dec. 6, 2013 photo, passengers travel on a Sarmiento line train in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Riding the commuter trains around Argentina’s capital can make for a dismal, sweaty trip on cars that mostly date back to the mid-1960s. Safety is a going concern among commuters: One train slammed into a downtown station last year, killing 51 people and pushing the government to take over direct operation of the trains from private companies. Then a crash in June killed three people. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

  • In this Monday, Nov. 11, 2013 photo, people ride the train heading to the Once station in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Riding the commuter trains around Argentina’s capital can make for a dismal, sweaty trip on cars that mostly date back to the mid-1960s. Safety is a going concern among commuters: One train slammed into a downtown station last year, killing 51 people and pushing the government to take over direct operation of the trains from private companies. Then a crash in June killed three people. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

  • In this Monday, Nov. 11, 2013 photo, people stand on a train's door heading to the Once station in the suburbs of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Riding the commuter trains around Argentina’s capital can make for a dismal, sweaty trip on cars that mostly date back to the mid-1960s. Safety is a going concern among commuters: One train slammed into a downtown station last year, killing 51 people and pushing the government to take over direct operation of the trains from private companies. Then a crash in June killed three people. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

  • In this Friday Dec. 6, 2013 photo, people wait for a train at the Liniers station in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Riding the commuter trains around Argentina’s capital can make for a dismal, sweaty trip on cars that mostly date back to the mid-1960s. Safety is a going concern among commuters: One train slammed into a downtown station last year, killing 51 people and pushing the government to take over direct operation of the trains from private companies. Then a crash in June killed three people. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

  • In this Friday Dec. 6, 2013 photo, a train departs the Liniers station in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Friday, Dec.6, 2013. After the Sarmiento line passenger train system suffered its third accident in less than two years, Argentina's government decided to take full control on operating and regulating the line, announcing new security measures but commuters say that much remains to be done and that riding the trains remains a hassle. The railways, signals and track have had little upgrading since being built early in the 20th century. The lines’ electrical system is more than 80 years old. .(AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

  • In this Friday, Dec.6, 2013 photo, a train departs the Liniers station in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Riding the commuter trains around Argentina’s capital can make for a dismal, sweaty trip on cars that mostly date back to the mid-1960s. Safety is a going concern among commuters: One train slammed into a downtown station last year, killing 51 people and pushing the government to take over direct operation of the trains from private companies. Then a crash in June killed three people. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

  • In this Friday, Dec.6, 2013 photo, people travel on the Sarmiento line train in Buenos Aires, Argentina. After the Sarmiento line passenger train system suffered its third accident in less than two years, Argentina's government decided to take full control on operating and regulating the line, announcing new security measures but commuters say that much remains to be done and that riding the trains remains a hassle. The railways, signals and track have had little upgrading since being built early in the 20th century. The lines’ electrical system is more than 80 years old. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)