(Updates with Reid out of hospital)

WASHINGTON, Dec 20 (Reuters) - U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid was released from the hospital after being diagnosed as exhausted and was cleared to return to work, a statement from his office said on Friday.

Reid, 74, had gone to the hospital as a precaution. "The doctors diagnosed him as exhausted, not anything more serious, and have cleared him to go back to work," the statement said.

The Nevada Democrat missed several key Senate votes as lawmakers wrapped up their work before the holiday break.

Senate Assistant Majority Leader Richard Durbin earlier said that he had spoken with Reid.

"He sounds hale and hearty and anxious to get home and then back to work," Durbin said on the Senate floor Friday afternoon.

"We look forward to that happening when he returns to this desk early in the new year," Durbin said just before the chamber halted its work for 2013. Senators return for legislative business in early January.

Reid, who was first elected to the Senate in 1986 and became its leader in 2007, suffered a stroke in 2005 and was injured last year when his motorcade crashed in Las Vegas.

In Reid's absence on Friday, the Senate voted to approve John Koskinen, President Barack Obama's nominee to lead the Internal Revenue Service, and Alejandro Mayorkas, Obama's pick for deputy secretary of the Department of Homeland Security.

Obama's nominee to head the U.S. Federal Reserve, Janet Yellen, also advanced on a key procedural vote. The Senate is expected to officially confirm Yellen, currently the Fed's vice chair, on Jan. 6. (Reporting by Susan Heavey; additional reporting by Thomas Ferraro; Editing by Scott Malone, Bernadette Baum, Paul Simao and Lisa Shumaker)

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  • Harry Reid (D-Nev.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/Majority_Minority_Leaders.htm#2">Senate Majority Leader</a>, 110th-112th Congress (2007-present)

  • Bill Frist (R-Tenn.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/Majority_Minority_Leaders.htm#2">Senate Majority Leader</a>, 108th & 109th Congress (2003-07)

  • Tom Daschle (D-S.D.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/Majority_Minority_Leaders.htm#2">Senate Majority Leader</a>, 107th Congress (2001-03)

  • Trent Lott (R-Miss.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/Majority_Minority_Leaders.htm#2">Senate Majority Leader</a>, 105th & 106th Congress (1997-2001)

  • Bob Dole (R-Kan.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/Majority_Minority_Leaders.htm#2">Senate Majority Leader</a>, 99th & 104th Congress (1985-87, 1995-96). Dole resigned from the Senate in June 1996 to focus on his presidential campaign.

  • George Mitchell (D-Maine)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/Majority_Minority_Leaders.htm#2">Senate Majority Leader</a>, 101st-103rd Congress (1989-95)

  • Robert Byrd (D-W.V.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/Majority_Minority_Leaders.htm#2">Senate Majority Leader</a>, 95th, 96th & 99th Congress (1977-81, 1985-87)

  • Howard Baker (R-Tenn.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/Majority_Minority_Leaders.htm#2">Senate Majority Leader</a>, 97th & 98th Congress (1981-85)

  • Mike Mansfield (D-Mont.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/Majority_Minority_Leaders.htm#2">Senate Majority Leader</a>, 87th-94th Congress (1961-77)

  • Lyndon Johnson (D-Texas)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/Majority_Minority_Leaders.htm#2">Senate Majority Leader</a>, 84th-86th Congress (1955-61). Johnson resigned from the Senate in Jan. 1961 to take on his new role as vice president.

  • William Knowland (R-Calif.)

    (Pictured right) <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/Majority_Minority_Leaders.htm#2">Senate Majority Leader</a>, 83rd Congress (1953-55)

  • Robert Taft (R-Ohio)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/Majority_Minority_Leaders.htm#2">Senate Majority Leader</a>, 83rd Congress (1953). Taft died on July 31, 1953 and William Knowland was elected to take over on August 4.

  • Ernest McFarland (D-Ariz.)

    (Pictured standing, far right) <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/Majority_Minority_Leaders.htm#2">Senate Majority Leader</a>, 82nd Congress (1951-53)

  • Scott Lucas (D-Ill.)

    (Pictured front row, left) <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/Majority_Minority_Leaders.htm#2">Senate Majority Leader</a>, 81st Congress (1949-51)

  • Wallace White Jr. (R-Maine)

    (Pictured far left) <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/Majority_Minority_Leaders.htm#2">Senate Majority Leader</a>, 80th Congress (1947-49)

  • Alben Barkley (D-Ky.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/Majority_Minority_Leaders.htm#2">Senate Majority Leader</a>, 75th-79th Congress (1937-47).

  • Joseph Robinson (D-Ark.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/Majority_Minority_Leaders.htm#2">Senate Majority Leader</a>, 73rd-75th Congress (1933-37). Robinson died on July 14, 1937, and Alben Barkley was elected a week later to take over.

  • James Watson (R-Ind.)

    (Pictured second from right) <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/Majority_Minority_Leaders.htm#2">Senate Majority Leader</a>, 71st & 72nd Congress (1929-33)

  • Charles Curtis (R-Kan.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/Majority_Minority_Leaders.htm#2">Senate Majority Leader</a>, 68th-70th Congress (1923-29). Curtis resigned from the Senate in March 1929 after being elected vice president.