One Million Moms Discusses Honey Maid 'Love' Pro-Gay Ad

04/08/2014 10:46 am ET | Updated Feb 02, 2016
  • James Nichols The Huffington Post

Controversial and polarizing conservative group One Million Moms has a long history of anti-LGBT sentiment. The organization most recently made headlines for their response to a commercial by Nabisco's Honey Maid.

In early March, the graham cracker company released an ad that showcased a diverse range of families, including one with two dads. In response, One Million Moms slammed the company, claiming that Nabisco should be ashamed of themselves for "attempt[ing] to normalize sin."

The backlash from One Million Moms and other conservative organizations sparked Honey Maid to release "Love," another ad in which the company hired artists to make an art installation out of all of the hateful comments directed at the initial commercial.

“That’s how they decided to respond, and that’s fine. That’s their choice. Now we know where they stand,” Monica Cole, director of One Million Moms, told Vocativ.com. “Now we know not to support Honey Maid, and we won’t be buying their products. …We can vote with our wallets.”

Cole also chatted with Vocativ.com about how the group chooses which television shows to target.

“Even if part of the show has a good base as far as the plot line, if there’s anything added in it that we would find not appropriate, it’s kind of like a batch of brownies,” One Million Moms Director Monica Cole said in the interview. “You put a little poison in it, you’re still not going to eat them. A little bit of poison can ruin the whole batch.”

The interview in full can be read at Vocativ.

Aside from the Honey Maid ad, One Million Moms recently initiated an e-mail campaign earlier this year after the Disney Channel's "Good Luck Charlie" featured a lesbian couple. They also spearheaded a failed boycott of JC Penney in 2012 after the retail chain hired openly lesbian Ellen DeGeneres as the store's spokesperson.

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