Mayor 'Kind Of Agreed' With White Supremacist Accused Of Killing 3 At Jewish Centers

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Marionville, Missouri Mayor Dan Clevenger said he "kind of agreed" with some of the beliefs of Frazier Glenn Cross, the 73-year-old accused of killing three people outside of a Jewish community center and retirement complex near Kansas City on Sunday.

In an interview with KSPR, Clevenger said Cross -- who also goes by the name Frazier Glenn Miller -- was "[v]ery fair and honest and never had a bit of problems out of him."

"He was always nice and friendly and respectful of elder people, you know, he respected his elders greatly. As long as they were the same color as him," Clevenger said.

"Kind of agreed with him on some things but, I don't like to express that too much," Clevenger told KSPR, which noted the mayor had expressed his views before:

That hasn't always been the case. Nearly a decade ago, Clevenger wrote a letter to the editor of the Aurora Advertiser.

"I am a friend of Frazier Miller helping to spread his warnings," wrote Clevenger. "The Jew-run medical industry has succeeded in destroying the United State's workforce."

The letter continued.

"Made a few Jews rich by killin' us off."

He also spoke of the "Jew-run government backed banking industry turned the U.S into the world's largest debtor nation."

Clevenger tried to distance himself from Cross, saying he doesn't believe what Cross would talk about.

"He had a lot of hate built up inside of him," Clevenger told CNN. "And every time he'd come down here, he'd go on about different races -- mainly Jews. He claims they're all bad, but I don't believe that."

Clevenger also told CNN he doesn't "think Marionville citizens really gave a lot of attention to that stuff."

After the shooting, Clevenger told the AP how Cross often distributed racist pamphlets in his town.

Read more at KSPR.

(h/t Gawker)

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