Teens React To Jonah Hill Using Homophobic Slur

Posted: Updated:
Print Article

When someone uses an anti-gay slur, does it mean they're homophobic?

In this video from The Fine Brothers, a group of teens weighed in on this debate by reacting to the videos of Jonah Hill hurling the word "f****t" at a TMZ reporter and subsequently apologizing on "The Tonight Show" with Jimmy Fallon.

What is most interesting about the teens' responses is the disparity between them. On one end, some believed Hill's words were out of line.

"[His words were] definitely offensive to the LBGT community," said Rachel, 18.

Others were more forgiving.

"I don't see it is a huge deal. It's someone responding from being hurt," said Shant, 18.

But Michael, 15, did not not see anger as an excuse.

"I think if you say something, whether you're angry or not, it still means something in you, somewhere," he said.

Jeannie, 19, argued Hill's words were acceptable because of how often they're used.

"No [it's not bad]," she said. "Like, 'suck my d**k, f****t!' Everyone says that."

Despite their varied opinions, the teens did agree on one thing: their own experience with homophobic language; and often, being the target of it.

"[I've had homophobic slurs used toward me] all the time by my friends," said Alix 18. "But we don't take it seriously towards each other."

Michael, 15, evoked sports as a place ridden with homophobic language.

"Yeah, it happens," he said. "Especially on the football field. That happens a lot."

Overall, the teens' responses provide a fascinating -- and diverse -- commentary on this controversial issue. Filmmaker Benny Fine agrees in an email to The Huffington Post:

"It's insightful watching teenagers who are surrounded by this kind of language every day," he said. "We really dove deep to see what they thought -- and how language can be hurtful. A controversial topic, but important to be discussing."

It certainly is. So, let's keep the discussion going.

Also on HuffPost:

Anti-Gay Celebrity Statements
of
Share
Tweet
Advertisement
Share this
close
Current Slide

Suggest a correction