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Brazil Picked Up Where It Left Off, Making Fans Sad And Surrendering Goals (VIDEOS)

07/12/2014 05:06 pm ET | Updated Jul 12, 2014
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Brazil hasn't stopped making the wrong kind of history.

Coming off a demoralizing 7-1 loss to Germany in the semifinals of the 2014 World Cup, Brazil fell behind early in its the third-place match against the Netherlands on Saturday. In the third minute at Nacional in Brasilia, Brazil captain Thiago Silva pulled down fleet-footed Dutch attacker Arjen Robben as he burst into the penalty area for a clear goal-scoring chance. The initial contact appeared to occur just outside of the Brazil penalty area but referee Djamel Haimoudi awarded a penalty kick. He also opted to show Silva a yellow card instead of a straight red.

While there may have been initial confusion about the placement and punishment of the foul there was no doubt about Robin Van Persie's kick from the penalty spot. The Netherlands' striker produced an early 1-0 lead with a strong left-footed shot.

That lead was doubled in the 16th minute when a ball headed by Brazil defender David Luiz dropped fortuitously for Netherlands midfielder Daley Blind. His right-footed shot from the heart of the penalty area beat Brazil goalkeeper Julio Cesar.

Those two early Dutch scores were the 12th and 13th allowed by Brazil at the 2014 World Cup. That is the highest total ever allowed by Brazil in any single World Cup and more than it surrendered combined at the World Cup in 2002, 2006 and 2010, according to ESPN Stats & Info.

The fans in Brasilia reacted accordingly.

Brazil would not surrender another goal during the first half, an improvement after allowing an astounding five goals to Germany in the opening 45 minutes of their lopsided semifinal.

The Netherlands would add a third goal in second-half stoppage time for the final 3-0 scoreline. The defeat brought a somber end to a once-promising World Cup campaign for Brazil.

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