TECH

Apollo 11 Mission's 45th Anniversary Reminds Us To Never Stop Taking Small Steps

07/18/2014 12:20 pm ET | Updated Jul 20, 2014

Forty-five years ago, on July 20, 1969, crew members of Apollo 11 made history when they walked on the moon.

"That's one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind," U.S. astronaut Neil Armstrong uttered as he became the first human to set foot on the surface of the moon at 10:56 p.m. EDT. Buzz Aldrin followed shortly thereafter and became the second man to walk on the lunar surface.

The pair, two of the three members of the Apollo 11 crew, spent the next two hours exploring completely uncharted territory.

Decades later, they are still among only a handful of people who have ever touched down on the moon. Humankind has not visited the moon since the Apollo 17 mission in 1972.

(Story continues below.)
neil armstrong moon 1969
One of the few photographs of Neil Armstrong on the moon shows him working on his spacecraft on the lunar surface.

neil armstrong moon
Astronaut Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin Jr. walks on the surface of the moon, with seismographic equipment that he just set up.

In honor of Apollo 11's 45th anniversary, the Slooh Space Camera will broadcast live footage from the lunar surface on Sunday, starting at 8:30 p.m. EDT. A panel of experts, including Slooh host Geoff Fox and astronomer Bob Berman, will be online to discuss mission details and share some anecdotes they've heard from the crew.

Astronauts aboard the International Space Station are also toasting Apollo 11 pioneers Armstrong, Aldrin and the third crew member, Michael Collins, for their successful mission.

"[W]e'd like to salute the Apollo 11 crew," U.S. astronaut Reid Wiseman said in a video produced to celebrate the 45th anniversary of the launch. "Forty-five years ago, Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins embarked on humanity's boldest journey. Apollo 11 not only achieved its mission to perform a manned lunar landing and return safely to Earth, it raised the bar of human potential."

Watch Slooh's live broadcast on July 20 in the video, below.

Related on HuffPost:

Apollo 11 Mission Photos
Suggest a correction
Comments

CONVERSATIONS