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Gays Want Christians 'To Have Open Sex With Everybody,' Pat Robertson Claims

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Pat Robertson is the latest conservative voice to sound off on the controversy surrounding a Colorado baker's refusal to prepare a wedding cake for a same-sex couple.

As Right Wing Watch is reporting, Robertson argued in defense of Masterpiece Cakeshop owner Jack Phillips on "The 700 Club" this week, suggesting that lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) rights groups were determined to "endanger our society and set it up for the judgment of God."

“What the gays are saying is, ‘We’re going to drive you out of town, either you conform to us or you must leave.’ That’s the message that’s being put out," Robertson said. "It’s the same message that there was in Sodom and Gomorrah: You’re either going to have sex with angels or have open sex with anybody or else you leave, or you go out of business."

He then concluded, "That’s America, you don’t want that, do you?”

Robertson, whose opposition to LGBT causes is well-established, offered similar sentiments in an earlier "700 Club" broadcast, claiming that Jesus Christ wouldn't have served same-sex couples because they would have been stoned to death instead.

"So Jesus would not have baked them a wedding cake nor would He have made them a bed to sleep in because they wouldn’t have been there," he said at the time. "But we don’t have that in this country here so that’s the way it is."

Robertson joins the likes of the American Family Association's Bryan Fischer, who claimed that Phillips was a victim of what he described as "the Secular Inquisition," Right Wing Watch also reported.

Similarly, the Southern Evangelical Seminary's Richard Land argued, "This would be like going to a bakery owned by an African-American, and saying, ‘By the way, you have to bake a cake for a KKK induction ceremony, under penalty of law.’"

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