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800,000 Red Poppies Pour Like Blood From The Tower Of London

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In honor of the 100th anniversary of World War I, the historic Tower of London has been transformed by a massive art installation.

Titled "Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red," the expansive piece brings 888,246 ceramic poppies to the property of Her Majesty's Royal Palace and Fortress. Appearing like a blood-red moat around the castle, the poppies pay tribute to the Great War's fallen troops.

tower of london poppy

Created by artist Paul Cummins, the poppy installation will be on view from August 5 -- the day Britain became involved in the First World War 100 years ago -- until November 11, or Armistice Day. Throughout the installation's run, the names of 180 WWI soldiers who died in battle will be read out in a Roll of Honour. According to the Historic Royal Palaces, members of the public can nominate a name using a weekly first come nomination system.

  • (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
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    Each ceramic poppy represents an allied victim of the First World War and the display is due to be completed by Armistice Day on November 11, 2014. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
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    After Armistice Day each poppy from the installation will be available to buy for 25 GBP. (AP Photo/Rob Taggart)
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    Volunteers install porcelain poppies as part of the art installation 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper marking the centenary of the start of World War 1 at the Tower of London in London on August 3, 2014.
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    Volunteers assemble an installation entitled 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' by artist Paul Cummins, made up of 888,246 ceramic poppies in the moat of the Tower of London to commemorate the First World War on July 28, 2014 in London, England. (Photo by Oli Scarff/Getty Images)
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    Crawford Butler, the longest serving Yeoman Warden at the Tower of London, poses with the first ceramic poppy to be 'planted' in the dry moat at Tower of London on July 17, 2014 in London, England.
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    Yeoman Serjeant Bob Loughlin admires a section of an installation entitled 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' by artist Paul Cummins. (Photo by Oli Scarff/Getty Images)
  • Oli Scarff via Getty Images
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  • JUSTIN TALLIS via Getty Images
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