Paul Ryan On Ferguson: People Should 'Sit Back And Let Law Enforcement Do Their Job'

08/19/2014 07:00 pm ET | Updated Aug 19, 2014
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WASHINGTON -- Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) waded into the Ferguson, Missouri, controversy on Tuesday and said the best way to bring about resolution is to let law enforcement do whatever they need to do.

"We should take a deep breath, sit back and let law enforcement do their job," he said during an interview with SiriusXM's David Webb. "Let the investigation take place so that the facts can be taken as the facts, and let justice be done appropriately."

Ryan, a potential 2016 presidential contender, said his thoughts are with the family of Michael Brown, the unarmed black teenager who was fatally shot on Aug. 9 by a white police officer -- an incident that has since sparked nightly clashes between local police and protesters. But in terms of next steps, the Wisconsin Republican said people should step aside to let law enforcement carry out their responsibilities.

"I think it's wrong to prejudge the outcome of these things or to try and attach our own personal political agenda to this tragedy," he said. "It would be disrespectful to this tragedy and the community and to the family, so I think as a public and as leaders, let's let law enforcement do their job."

What Ryan didn't address, though, is that much of the current controversy in Ferguson stems from the use of excessive force by local law enforcement. A militarized and mostly white police force has been turning up nightly -- with tear gas, armored vehicles and rubber bullets -- to counter a group of mostly peaceful black protesters furious about the lack of answers surrounding Brown's death.

Ryan spokesman Robert Swift told The Huffington Post the congressman was making the point that local, state and federal law enforcement officials need to be able to carry out their investigations.

Swift did not respond when asked if that means Ryan supports the militarized police response to protesters.

08/26/2014 7:49 AM EDT

The Toll On Michael Brown's Family

USA Today's Yamiche Alcindor provides an intimate look at how Michael Brown's parents have been dealing with the loss of their son:

Phones constantly ring with reporters asking for interviews or family members offering support. Last week, as demands reached a tipping point, both parents moved into hotels to shield themselves.

In the days leading up to the funeral, Brown's mother continued to cry and spoke in whispers as she tried to explain her feelings.

"They say tomorrow is going to be the hardest day, but I think today was — just seeing my baby laying there, cold," Lesley McSpadden, 34, told USA TODAY. "It did something to my heart. It's too much. It's too much."

Read the rest at USA Today.

08/26/2014 7:44 AM EDT

New Audio Allegedly Captures Moment Michael Brown Was Shot

New audio has surfaced that allegedly captures the moment when Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, was shot dead by Darren Wilson, a white police officer, on Aug. 9.

CNN aired the unverified recording on Monday night. Six shots can be heard, followed by a pause, then several more. A private autopsy performed on Aug. 17 at the request of Brown's family found that the 18-year-old was shot 6 times, including twice in the head.

Read the rest here.

08/25/2014 12:58 PM EDT

Al Sharpton: America, It's Time To Deal With Policing

08/25/2014 12:53 PM EDT

Al Sharpton: All Of Us Are Required To Respond

08/25/2014 12:48 PM EDT

Benjamin Crump: We Will Not Accept Three-Fifths Justice For Michael Brown

08/25/2014 12:28 PM EDT

Funeral Program Includes Tribute From Michael Brown's Parents

USA Today reporter, Yamiche Alcindor shares photo of program which includes tributes to Michael Brown from his mother and father

08/25/2014 12:22 PM EDT

Michael Brown's Stepmother: He Prophesied His Own Death

08/25/2014 12:16 PM EDT

Michael Brown Had Been Dreaming About Death

08/25/2014 11:57 AM EDT

Program For The Funeral

08/25/2014 11:14 AM EDT

Public Still Trying To Get Inside Church

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