Japan Unveils Designs For First Underwater City, And We're In Awe

01/12/2015 09:16 am ET | Updated Jan 12, 2015

We've seen people living in tiny homes, big homes and everything in between -- but nobody has ever taken underwater dwelling to a level like this.

A Japanese architecture firm has unveiled renderings of what would be the world's first underwater city, which the firm says could be constructed as early as 2035. The massive, spherical structure measures more than four football fields in length, and its electricity and water supplies extend almost two miles deep into the sea. There's space for businesses, hotels and homes for up to 5,000 people off the coast of Japan. An "Earth Factory" recycles CO2 for the society, which we're assuming can be entered via a ship port (though the details teeter on fuzzy).

The goal, says Shimizu Corporation in a press release, is to "make the most" of undersea space, as some neighborhoods on land face damage from rising sea levels. "The Ocean Spiral," while not likely to be constructed anytime soon, would have sustainable fisheries, plazas and promenades for its residents. Oh, and did we mention the deep-sea gondola system?

Making a home on land is awesome, but in this case we're so ready to take the plunge.

  • Shimizu Corporation
  • The city from afar, with its lower "Infra Spiral" reaching to the ocean floor.
  • Shimizu Corporation
  • The "Blue Garden" sphere would measure 500 meters -- more than four football fields! -- in diameter.
  • Shimizu Corporation
  • The massive inner atrium.
  • Shimizu Corporation
  • A "deep sea promenade" would provide open space for residents.
  • Shimizu Corporation
  • The "Blue Garden's grand entrance.
  • Shimizu Corporation
  • A deep-sea gondola extends from the bottom of the sphere.
  • Shimizu Corporation
  • ...and reaches almost two miles to the sea floor.


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