There's A Hack To Hanging Sweaters So They Don't Stretch Out

02/20/2015 07:00 am ET | Updated Feb 24, 2015

The key to an amazing closet is all in how you hang -- not only on the right hangers, but also in the right, hack-tastic way.

Allow us to explain: You know how when you hang a sweater, it tends to stretch under its own weight and get those little bumps in the shoulders?

Well, there's a hack for that. Watch, be amazed, and never ruin a sweater again.

STEP 1: Fold your sweater in half.

STEP 2: Place the hanger hook in the armpit, and fold the waist and sleeves over the hanger.

STEP 3: Ta da! A stretch-free hang (and some serious sweater origami).

Keep in mind that there's also a chance your sweater might be better off folded if it stretches out on a hanger. Organizing guru Marie Kondo of KonMari Method fame suggests that you fold sweaters into long rectangular shapes so they can vertically stand in a drawer.

(h/t Snapguide)

  • The "Leave No Space Behind" Answer to Those Stubborn Angles
    Courtesy of 320 Sycamore
    Even though your closet is called a "reach-in," the name doesn't quite fit, since the only way to retrieve clothing from its dark corners is with a stretch, a yank and a pull. If you're frustrated with the dead space on the sides, try blogger Melissa Smith of 320 Sycamore's ingenious solution. Remove the long rod and shelf that go straight across the closet side-to-side and replace it with one that is the width of the doorframe. In one corner of the closet, install two closet rods, one lower and one higher (basically, perpendicular to the new, shorter left-to-right rod). The top bar should hang approximately 75 to 80 inches from the floor; the bottom bar, ideal for shorter items such as shirts and skirts, approximately 36 to 40 inches. Tension rods make this a snap (if you're storing lighter-weight items). For more detailed information, see Melissa's tutorial here.
  • The New Home for Your Strappy Party Shoes
    Roeshel at DIYShowOff
    Not all shoes are created equal -- which means wear-only-for-special-occasions heels often get short shrift. But instead of keeping them out of sight in shoe boxes, use crown molding along the back wall of your closet (or even on the inside of the door) in one or multiple rows to create shoe organizers. Just 30 inches of molding can hold four pairs of shoes. If you need more guidance, this Home Depot community forum outlines the how-to steps you can follow to build the shoe racks.
  • The Upcycle That Will Double Your Space
    Tara Charlton from IdeaBottle.blogspot.com
    Before you recycle that Diet Coke can, pull the tab off to use as a quick way to double the hanging space available on one hanger. As shown in this tutorial from Idea Bottle, simply slide the tab down the hook of a hanger to its base, and then slip another hanger hook through the lower hole of the tab. Voila! Now you can store more clothing on a single closet rod. (This also is a great way to pair outfits together.)
  • The Leftover Hooks That Are Afraid of Water
    Laura Wittmann of OrgJunkie.com
    Wondering what to do with the surplus shower-curtain rings lurking in your linen closet? Laura Wittmann, author of Clutter Rehab: 101 Tips and Tricks to Become an Organization Junkie and Love It!, and blogger behind -your-scarves-hats-with-shower-hooks.html" target="_blank">I'm an Organizing Junkie, clips shower-curtain rings to a hanger and then loops scarves through them, which saves space and keeps everything wrinkle-free. (The same trick works for hats and belts.)
  • The Slipped-Your-Mind Solution That Takes Less Than 1 Minute
    One Good Thing By Jillee
    You could spend $30 on a set of felt hangers; or, you could try one of these DIY methods from blogger Jill Nystul of One Good Thing By Jillee. Take a few pipe cleaners; wrap one around each end of a hanger, starting slightly after where the neckline of the clothing would sit. Rubber bands work, as well. However, Jill's favorite solution is to use a hot glue gun to make a zigzag pattern along the top of the hanger to create a grip, which, she says, is just as effective but the clear glue is less noticeable.
  • The Trick You Learned at the Office
    Ainhoa from A Little Bite of Everything
    We've worked in offices. We've also woken up to realize the one T-shirt we wanted to wear was at the bottom of the dirty-laundry pile. But it was Ainhoa Vega of the blog A Little Bite of Everything who put two and two together. She installed two towel rods lengthwise, one across the front and one along the back of the drawer; and then placed several metal rods that slide perpendicular to the towel rods, joining them. The result? An at-home closet-filing system where you fold T-shirts on rods in drawers so you can see all your options at once. For a complete how-to explanation, visit her blog post and say goodbye to T-shirt clutter once and for all.
  • The Third Shelf You Didn't Know You Could Fit
    Roeshel at DIYShowOff
    If you've already doubled your closet space by installing two levels of hanging rods, you might not realize that there's space for one more rod -- and no, it's not at the ceiling. If you put a third tension rod right below your lowest rod, you can use loset-boot-storage-day-4.html" target="_blank">pants hangers to corral your boots, store flip-flops with bent wire hangers and dangle purses or hats from S hooks.
Suggest a correction
Comments

CONVERSATIONS