Poll Reveals Americans' Feelings About Open Relationships And Sex Parties

03/24/2015 08:14 am ET | Updated Feb 02, 2016

HuffPost's Love+Sex podcast recently traveled to Brooklyn to find out what happens at one of the most exclusive sex parties in New York.

While there were many surprises at the event, co-hosts Carina Kolodny and Noah Michelson were perhaps most intrigued to discover the diversity of the guests attending the party and it got them wondering: How does the rest of the United States feel about sex parties and the idea of non-monogamous relationships?

So HuffPost teamed up with YouGov and presented a series of questions about the subject to 1,000 American adults. Because of the sexual nature of the questions, only 906 people agreed to answer them and here's what we learned (to find out more about the methodology behind our polling, scroll to the end of this post):


Are you surprised by the data? What are your thoughts on sex parties and open relationships? Sound off in the comments section below and be sure to have a listen to HuffPost's Love+Sex podcast:

And if you want to download and/or listen on iTunes, head here.

This podcast was produced by Katelyn Bogucki with additional production by Jorge Corona. Like Love + Sex? Subscribe, rate and review our podcast on iTunes.

The HuffPost/YouGov poll consisted of 1,000 completed interviews conducted March 17-18 among U.S. adults, including 906 who agreed to answer questions about sex, using a sample selected from YouGov's opt-in online panel to match the demographics and other characteristics of the adult U.S. population.

The Huffington Post has teamed up with YouGov to conduct daily opinion polls. You can learn more about this project and take part in YouGov's nationally representative opinion polling. Data from all HuffPost/YouGov polls can be found here. More details on the poll's methodology are available here.

Most surveys report a margin of error that represents some, but not all, potential survey errors. YouGov's reports include a model-based margin of error, which rests on a specific set of statistical assumptions about the selected sample, rather than the standard methodology for random probability sampling. If these assumptions are wrong, the model-based margin of error may also be inaccurate. Click here for a more detailed explanation of the model-based margin of error.

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