The Key To Making Philanthropy Really Work

04/21/2015 05:44 pm ET | Updated Jun 01, 2015

Philanthropic investment firms succeed by empowering organizations that will really make a positive difference in the lives of others. Selecting the ones to invest in can be quite a difficult task -- but one worth taking on.

Sal Giambanco, a partner at the Omidyar Network, is hoping his firm can inspire effective and enduring change for those in need. He joined HuffPost Live host Caroline Modarressy-Tehrani to discuss his foundation's method of operation they abide by in order to be successful in their goal.

"The advice I would have for anyone involved in social action, social justice and the reduction of human suffering is to focus," said Giambanco. "We focus on things like consumer and Internet mobile -- many of us were Internet executives... we have that experience on staff, and we like technology. We have an initiative around education -- education I think transforms human beings... Financial inclusion, bringing people access to capital so that they can actually make the right life choices and decisions for themselves; governance and civic engagement, the idea of transparency in government and empowering citizens to drive their lives; and property rights. I think for us, those are the key initiatives that we focus on to try and make a difference in people's lives."

Watch the full HuffPost Live clip above to hear more from the conversation.

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