THE BLOG
01/31/2012 09:30 am ET Updated Mar 31, 2012

An Atheist President: Is There Any Future?

I sometimes enjoy pretending that I am running for President. One of the issues that have always set in my mind is the issue of religion, or rather my religion. I do not believe in any God. I imagine questions opponents might ask to bring about aspects voters would deem negative.

Opponent or Reporter: Alton Lu, I have a question that I believe all Americans would really like to know. Do you believe in God?

Alton Lu: I ask this question of myself a lot. It's remarkable the importance that religion has in politics, not that I'm opposed to it in any way. To answer simply, I don't believe in God. But before passing supreme judgment upon my candidacy, allow me to explain.

Some might consider me immoral; they might think that my non-belief is paramount to being a Satanist that no one can trust, or that I would lead the country to disaster. That is not true. I merely believe in what I was taught in school. I believe in the mistakes I've made and the experiences I have learned from.

There is this belief that an atheist is automatically an anti-religionist. This is also not true. As an atheist, I understand that all religions play a significant part in life. If I became president, I would do nothing to infringe on anyone's right to worship their God as they see fit, unless it involves breaking another law.

I wouldn't advocate teaching creationism in school, because that's a church involved teaching. Not all teachers are religious, nor are all kids religious. The Christian creationism is different than the Muslim creation. Even within Christianity, there are issues with the sects such as Protestant, Catholic, and Mormon that believe differently as well. We cannot infringe on the rights of a lesser practiced belief by teaching Christian creationism. We would be forced to teach either all religions or none at all. It's the only way to ensure all religions are equally represented.

Just because I don't believe in God, does not mean I believe the Bible is worthless. I've read the Bible myself, as an academic text. I agree with the reasonable teachings of Christianity's God, even if I don't think he's real.

Teachings within Leviticus often states strange rules that I wouldn't say I believe in. Don't wear clothes made of more than one fabric (Leviticus 19:19). Don't cut your hair or shave. (Leviticus 19:27). To these I pay no heed. But there are several teachings that do lead to a better society.

Written across the Bible is the idea of the Golden Rule -- treat others how you would like to be treated. The Bible advocates that a person shouldn't lie. The Bible states that one should never steal. The morals taught within the Bible are also experiences that any citizen would grow up learning, yet the outcome is the same. Stealing is wrong. Lying is to be looked down upon. I shall treat everyone as I believe they should treat me. Morals I believe in, and morals the Bible preaches.

Yet, we see our Christian politicians today who think it is okay to steal taxpayer dollars for their own benefit. We have politicians who believe it is acceptable to lie to their constituents about their true goals and intentions. They treat the middle class as lower citizens and expect votes in return.

So instead of asking me whether I believe in God, ask yourself: Would you rather have a president who believes only in God, or one who follows the reasonable teachings he preaches?