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Andrea Wachter

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Fat Chat Is No Light Matter

Posted: 06/28/2012 2:11 pm

As an eating disorders therapist and woman who spent the majority of my life in the grip of a weight and food obsession, I walk around with my antennae tuned in to whatever might help me understand how we got ourselves into this mess. Obesity is now considered an epidemic. My young bulimic clients tell me, "Vomiting is no big deal." Every day, people die from anorexia-related complications. And let's face it, folks: Even many Americans of average weight are preoccupied with food and body image. Recently in a grocery store check-out line, I stood behind a 30-something mom and her little girl. The mother was chatting on her cell phone while the daughter was clinging to her mom's leg with one hand and sucking on the thumb of the other. The mother's side of the conversation went like this: "Oh, I was so bad yesterday! I had a whole piece of chocolate cake at the party. I am not eating any carbs today. I feel as big as a house." I wanted to hand the daughter my business card right then and there! I refrained, though, since the kid, still in diapers, was a little too young for therapy. My point is that your children are listening. They are listening when you partake in what I call "fat chat." They are listening when you say you feel "fat" (which, by the way, is not a feeling). They are listening when you say you were "bad" or "good" or "evil" or "sinned" because of a food you either ate or passed up. They are listening when you say you need to go to the gym to work off your dessert. They are listening when you comment on other people's bodies or your own. Your children are listening and learning and following suit. And what they often end up thinking is: "I better watch out. I might get fat. Maybe I am fat. If I am, then people are judging me. I better control my eating. Uh-oh, I can't stop eating. Hunger is bad. Fullness is worse."

Every year, my clients get younger. I have seen 6-year-olds who are already dieting and know about carbs, fats and calories. I worked with a 7-year-old girl who was spitting up her food because she was convinced that calories were bad for her. Last year, I had a 9-year-old client who had to change her school clothes several times each morning till she found something she didn't feel "fat" in. Most often, though, people don't get to my door until they have been entrenched in food and weight struggles for many years. While an eating disorder is possible to overcome, the longer it goes on, the harder it is to heal. We need to do prevention at the ground level. We have a choice: We can teach our children to relax, listen to their bodies and love themselves, or we can teach them to be anxious, controlling, and out of touch with their own hunger and fullness.

My message here is not to blame or to shame, but merely to highlight the fact that unless we model a healthy, balanced, and loving relationship with food and our own bodies, children are at risk for developing disordered eating, poor body image, and/or weight problems. Take a look at the messages you are teaching. Learn to enjoy food again. Stay conscious of your body's hunger and fullness levels and act on them. Get help if you can't. Treat your body with respect and appreciation. After all, isn't this what we want our kids to do?

Tips for Helping Your Child with Body Image

• If you find yourself "feeling fat," explore a little deeper to see if there's something else going on in your life. Model for your children that "fat" is not a feeling, but rather "feeling fat" can be a distraction from more difficult issues.

• Try not to label food as "good" or "bad." Some foods are more nutrient dense than others, but morally all food is equal -- it's fuel! Talk with your kids about the nutritional value and variety of different foods, the art of cooking, and the fun and the pleasure of eating.

• Talk to your kids about the difference between emotional and physical hunger and how the two often get mixed up. Physical hunger is a feeling in the belly that the body needs fuel. Teach kids to notice degrees of hunger and fullness as well as how to eat when they are hungry and stop when they are full. Emotional hunger is usually a need to express feelings or have feelings acknowledged. When kids are sad, they might need to cry, talk about it, or draw a picture. When they are mad, they might want to write, draw, punch a pillow, tell you about it with gusto, and have you really hear them.

• Along these same lines, talk about the role of feelings: that they are signposts for living, and not to be "stuffed" or "starved" away. Teach them that just like there are no "good" or "bad" foods, there are no "good" or bad" feelings.

• Do not comment on other people's bodies. This sets up a comparison mentality that is harmful and hard to give up. Talk about how everyone is beautiful in their own way, and that beauty is an inner quality that can be expressed in outer characteristics such as kindness and enthusiasm.

• Exercise with your kids for the joy of movement, not for how many calories you might burn.

• Look at family photos and talk about where your size and shape came from.

• Watch TV together and discuss the emphasis our culture places on looks, image, and thinness. Help them to notice special qualities in themselves like compassion and humor as well as things that interest them beyond their appearance. Teach them that they are enough just by being who they are -- on the inside. (While you're at it, think about yourself that way, too!)

• Do de-stressing activities together, like: listening to music, walking, spending time in nature, playing games, doing a hobby or craft, or reading and discussing a particular book.

• Help them to foster love for themselves when they look in the mirror. Teach them to "see" themselves with the same love that they feel for other people or animals in their lives.

• Make a list together of all the things that our bodies do for us. Help them to appreciate their various body parts rather than criticize them.

• Talk about what makes a good role model. Ask for an example of a person who seems to be a healthy, balanced eater with a positive body image. Discuss what qualities that person has that demonstrate good health. Ask your child to imagine having those same qualities inside.

• Teach your child that weight fluctuations are normal and healthy and that we all have a natural weight range just like we have a natural eye and hair color. Help them prepare for weight changes, especially girls approaching puberty.

• Role model and practice all of these things along with your child so they can experience you as a healthy eater with loving body image!

Originally published at EatingDisorderRecoveryToday.com

Andrea Wachter is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. She has appeared on several radio and television shows and served as The Food and Emotions Expert for America Online. Currently, she is in private practice in Northern California where she works with adults, adolescents, families and groups. Andrea is co-founder of InnerSolutions Counseling Services and co-author of The Don't Diet, Live-It Workbook. She is also co-director of Healthy Living Programs for the Human Fulfillment Institute. Andrea is an inspirational author and counselor who brings expertise, humor and personal recovery to her clients. For more information on her book or her online course, Defeating Overeating, go to: www.innersolutions.net Andrea can be reached at: andrea@innersolutions.net

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