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Making A Statement

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When you look at spiritual life in an evolutionary context, you cannot see yourself and your own development as separate from the entire cosmic continuum of the life process. And this creates a profound moral context for your own spiritual evolution--a moral imperative to transform yourself. Why? Because you and the process are one.

Think about it--if you are the highest expression, as far as we know, of the leading edge of the entire evolutionary unfolding, then what you do is always a reflection of the process itself. The way in which you engage with the world is a statement about how you see and understand the process that gave life to you. The expression of your own humanity--your greater or lesser degree of inspired moral development, higher virtue, and spiritual enlightenment--is an expression of what the leading edge of the process actually is. Your life--the life you are living right now--is a public event, an evolutionary event, an event that says something significant about Life itself. The way you are, as an individual, is your personal contribution to what evolution looks like here and now.

If you aspire to live an exemplary life--if you strive to express the most deeply positive capacities in the human soul, and actually succeed, to some degree--then you are making a very positive statement about our shared evolutionary process. But if you choose, consciously or unconsciously, to live a life of mediocrity, then you are also making a statement. Because you are not flourishing, what you're saying, whether you intend to or not, is that the evolutionary process is not flourishing.

So when you begin to recognize that your own presence here in this world is part of something infinitely bigger than yourself, you feel a sense of obligation awakening within you--a spiritually inspired obligation to be the very best you can be for the sake of the process itself. And the way you respond to that obligation, to that sense of cosmic responsibility, is by demonstrating that the process is profoundly positive, indeed the process is sacred, through your own example, through your own victory, through your own tangible and unmistakable higher development.

Andrew Cohen, Spiritual Teacher on Facebook