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Chivalry is Dead -- And So Is Facebook

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On the 16th of November I deactivated my Facebook profile. I had been contemplating whether to do so for a while, and so I hit the deactivation button. I know, deactivate Facebook? Why would you do that, aren't you going to be disconnected? I deactivated it for my own good; I have come to realize that liking profile pictures and looking at pictures of people holding red Solo cups is not the best way to occupy myself. Facebook used to be a fun place to share posts, but it has changed into a black hole of stalking, hundreds of likes on profile pictures, and chaos in one social media site.

I have wanted to deactivate my Facebook for a while. I realized that it wasn't really keeping me connected to anyone and the only reason I stayed was to have a way to see who my friends were crushing on, or to wish my cousins a happy birthday. I am going to honest. My friend would tell me that she/he likes a certain person from another town or school. The first thought that would occur to me is "Does he have a Facebook?" I mean, I need to make sure this person isn't a creep, so I stalk him. I go on Facebook around 7 p.m. and the next thing I know, it's 10:30 and I've come to the conclusion that I'm the one who's the creep. Facebook to me was not a way to stay connected but instead a giant way for me to creep myself out.

Another reason why Facebook died in my eyes is that everyone on Facebook has 100+ likes on their profile picture. When I'm scrolling down my news feed and see that a certain person has that many likes, I feel pressured to like it as well. My thought process is along the lines of "I could've sat sort of close to you in that class, maybe." I feel compelled to compliment your perfect picture and it just increases the awkwardness of the situation -- I don't even know you. When I like your picture, I feel like I am asking you to be my best friend! It doesn't make sense at all!

I got my Facebook account in seventh grade. It was a huge deal and I remember feeling so cool -- I had a Facebook! Four years later Facebook has lost its sparkle. I found myself sitting on my computer for hours looking at peoples' posts, not exactly finding intellectual inspiration in updates like "OMG it's so cold!" It just seems to me that over the years Facebook has evolved into a place for eighth graders to post statements of the obvious and achieve new records for most likes on a profile picture.

Instead of stalking people, I've found new ways to spend my time. One thing I have begun that I believe will help me in my future is learning American Sign Language online. I learned the alphabet and how to say "I don't understand." With my newfound knowledge, I can have conversations consisting of "A, B, C... I don't know." But at least I can have them in person.

I also started signing petitions on whitehouse.gov. Texas is one signature closer to being its own country! (Just kidding!) But I feel it's important to have your say in our government by signing petitions that could be the next story you see on CNN. The last thing that consumes me now is a website called Polyvore. It has many clothes from stores from all around the world and you can put them together any way you want. You become a stylist by simply making an account.

So Facebook, until I reactivate my profile to resume my stalking expeditions and awkward Internet moments, good-bye.

Sincerely, your signing, politically active stylist,
Anne.