Ken Gruberman, a life-long resident of Los Angeles, has two identities and bridges two worlds. As The Tech Daddy, Ken helps people understand the personal technology that is all around them, such as Macintosh and Windows-based computers, cell phones, digital cameras and the like. Ken wrote for “MacUser Magazine” for 7 years and edited his own national, award-winning publication for 17 years. Ken has contributed articles on personal technology to AARP Magazine, which has the biggest circulation of any general interest magazine in the world. Ken consults with individual clients and businesses on the most effective ways to use their computer hardware and software, how to prevent problems from occurring, how to effectively integrate Macs and PCs, and the best strategies for maximizing their computer investment. As Quill Music, Ken is a six-time Grammy Award winning music copyist, orchestrator, librarian, contractor, score supervisor and researcher. For the past 46 years his work has appeared in music for films and television. He has worked with some of the most respected film composers in Hollywood, including John Williams (Rosewood, Seven Years in Tibet, Amistad and Summon the Heroes for the 1996 Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta), Jerry Goldsmith (Air Force One, The Shadow), George Fenton (Final Analysis, Groundhog Day, Multiplicity) Hans Zimmer (Broken Arrow, Eraser), Alan Silvestri (Contact), Randy Newman (Maverick), James Newton Howard (Dante’s Peak, Outbreak) and David Arnold (Independence Day). In addition, Ken has worked with the composer Joseph Vitarelli on more than 20 different HBO films and documentaries, including the record-breaking miniseries “John Adams,” and the Academy-award nominated documentary “My Architect.” Ken was one of the first music preparation professionals in Los Angeles to use computer-based notation. He was a guiding influence for the development of MOTU’s “Composer’s Mosaic,” and worked with the development team for AVID’s “Sibelius” music notation software. In addition, Ken has spoken on many panels involving music notation and technology, and has given lectures and demos at both the Seybold Seminars and MacWorld Expo in San Francisco.

Load More Stories