Lita Albuquerque is an internationally renowned installation, environmental artist, painter and sculptor, who brings the realities of time and space to a human scale. For MOCA's 25th anniversary celebration, she was honored for her contributions to the museum, featured in their anniversary catalogue and in the permanent collection.

Lita Albuquerque is an internationally renowned installation, environmental artist, painter and sculptor. She has developed a visual language that brings the realities of time and space to a human scale and is acclaimed for both her ephemeral and permanent art works executed in the landscape and public sites. Albuquerque’s work questions our place in the enormity of infinite space and eternal time. She is one of the rare artists and humanists who are responsible for thoughtfully and imaginatively placing the elemental concepts for a living, functional cosmology for 21st century culture within public consciousness.
In the 1970s Albuquerque emerged on the California art scene and won acclaim for her epic and poetic ephemeral pigment pieces created for desert sites. She gained national attention in the late 1970s with her ephemeral pigment installations pertaining to mapping, identity and the cosmos, executed in the natural landscape. In 1980 Albuquerque completed her pivotal installation, The Washington Monument Project, as featured in the International Sculptural Conference. In 2006 she executed the large-scale ephemeral work Stellar Axis: Antarctica, in which she placed ninety-nine blue orbs aligned to the stars above, creating a reverse sky on the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica. The work combines art with science and examines the human connection with the cosmos and the possibility of light as that link.

In June 2004 she was honored by MOCA for its 25th anniversary celebration for her contributions to the museum. Her work is featured in their anniversary catalogue and permanent collection. Last year she participated in the Getty Museum’s Pacific Standard Time Performance Festival with her performative sculpture, Spine of the Earth, 2012, a re-invention of her 1980 piece in the Mojave Desert. Albuquerque is a noted educator and has been on the core faculty of the Fine Art Graduate Program at Art Center College of Design for the last 20 years.