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Entries by Arianna Huffington from 09/2011

Sunday Roundup

| Posted 09.04.2011 | Politics

This week, Speaker Boehner flat-out rejected President Obama's request to unveil his new jobs plan at a joint session of Congress this coming Wednesday, saying Thursday would be better. Forget actually taking action on the unemployment crisis -- they can't even agree on the date for a speech about the unemployment crisis! A few days later, the Labor Department released the worst jobs report in 11 months. So here's the official tally: debates about the scheduling of a jobs speech, 1; jobs created in the last quarter, 0. Meanwhile, with promises from its author of "heads exploding all over Washington," Dick Cheney's memoir was published. Revelations included his desire to bomb Syria, and his dreams of living in an Italian villa -- come si dice "enhanced interrogation techniques"? I was going to end by wishing everyone a happy Labor Day, but John Boehner has decided to move it to later in the month.

Back To School And Deeper In Debt

| Posted 09.06.2011 | Huffington Post

With a new class of students starting college this month -- replacing a class that just graduated into a historically bad job market -- there's no better time for another installment of our "Majoring in Debt" series, which examines the mountainous student debt college graduates are facing, how it will affect their futures, and what it will mean for the future of America. When I was 16 and living in Greece, I saw a magazine article about Cambridge and was overcome by a desire to study there. And I was lucky enough to get in. In the years after graduating, pretty much every break I got could be traced back to that experience. But, increasingly, graduating from college no longer means putting your education to work for you -- it now means being a virtual indentured servant to your education. Instead of propelling you into the future, more and more it means trapping you in the past.

HuffPost's First e-Book: A People's History of the Great Recession

| Posted 09.07.2011 | Books

Our first e-book, A People's History of the Great Recession, puts flesh and blood on the data of our economic crisis, and brings to our readers the real stories of the unemployed, of those facing foreclosure, of the "formerly middle class."

Introducing HuffPost Tech UK

| Posted 09.07.2011 | UK Tech

The US and the UK may be, as George Bernard Shaw once said, two nations "separated by a common language," but they're definitely joined by a set of common problems: economic crises that have left millions unemployed or underemployed, an economic debate that has been hijacked by deficit and austerity hawks, and politicians with a remarkable ability to propose solutions that are actually making the problems worse. Yet in both countries, there is a movement fueled by social media, community engagement, and the growing understanding that real solutions aren't going to be coming from our politicians any time soon. So, in the meantime, millions of people in thousands of communities are taking the initiative to connect, engage and solve problems themselves.

9/11: A Decade After

| Posted 09.09.2011 | New York

Our special section, "9/11: A Decade After", will be examining the ways in which 9/11 changed America from all angles, from the economy to national security, politics, education, parenting, pop culture, and the arts. READ MORE

Back to School and Deeper in Debt With a new class of students starting college this month, there's no better time to examine the mountainous student debt college graduates are facing, how it will affect their futures, and what it will mean for the future of America. READ MORE

HuffPost's First e-Book: A People's History of the Great Recession Our first e-book puts flesh and blood on the data of our economic crisis, and brings to our readers the real stories of the "formerly middle class." READ MORE

Honouring the Memory of 9/11 by Honouring the Memory of 9/12

| Posted 09.10.2011 | UK Politics

Whenever I'm asked about my reaction to what happened on 9/11, as has happened quite a bit over the weeks leading up the 10th anniversary of the attacks, my mind flashes back to the moment when I first heard that the unthinkable had happened. I was at home in Los Angeles, getting my two daughters, then 10 and 12, ready for school, and thinking about a column I was planning to write that day. In an instant that all changed, of course. As we commemorate 9/11, we should also remember that this is also the 10th anniversary of 9/12, the day when the shock began to wear off, the full dimensions of the tragedy began to become clear, and the US began to decide what its reaction was going to be.

Sunday Roundup

| Posted 09.10.2011 | New York

Today, an entire nation remembers. And reflects. Be sure to check out our ongoing liveblog, with links to all of HuffPost's 9/11 coverage -- including Andrea Stone and John Rudolf on continuing national security vulnerabilities, and Tom Zeller and Lynne Peeples on the environmental impact of the attacks -- as well as links to the best 9/11 stories from around the web. We are also featuring a truly remarkable collection of pieces from our Patch network. We asked each of our 999 Patch editors to identify someone in their town whose life had been altered by 9/11 -- or something that had been forever changed. The stories are as moving as they are varied, including a Midwestern firehouse chaplain who was on a truck heading to New York as soon as the towers fell; a pilot who left the cockpit to run for office after 9/11; and the school where the youngest passenger on Flight 93 had been enrolled. Please check them out -- and add your own memories to the conversation.

Honoring The Memory Of 9/11 By Honoring The Memory Of 9/12

| Posted 09.12.2011 | Impact

As we commemorate 9/11, we should remember that this is also the 10th anniversary of 9/12 -- the day when the shock began to wear off, and the country began to decide what its reaction was going to be.

The Wall Street Journal's Shoddy Journalism on TechCrunch: It's Not About the Personalities, It's About the Principle

| Posted 09.12.2011 | Media

Now that the TechCrunch editorial dispute has been resolved, let me turn my attention to the Wall Street Journal's coverage of it. In the most egregious case of mislabeling this side of Zabar's no lobster "lobster salad," the Journal's front page, above-the-fold story on Saturday sought to paint the situation as a "culture clash" based on "clashing personalities." It was, in fact, nothing of the kind. The issue at hand wasn't about personalities. It was about principle; a very simple fundamental principle about conflicts of interest that every journalistic enterprise -- including the Wall Street Journal -- adheres to. But you wouldn't know that from the exceptionally misinformed, substance-lite, and anonymous-quote-riddled piece. There is one upside to this shoddy journalism: the Journal reporters got the story so wrong, at least we know they aren't hacking into our phones.

A Tale of Two Cities: Introducing HuffPost DC

| Posted 09.15.2011 | DC

At its heart, Washington, D.C. offers a tale of two cities. And it is this tale that animates our new section: HuffPost DC.

Sunday Roundup

| Posted 09.18.2011 | Politics

This week, audience members at a GOP debate cheered the prospect of letting an uninsured man die, prompting a Jon Huntsman staffer to say the outbursts made her "sick and sad" for her party. Other events of the week proved that "sick and sad" was an apt diagnosis: Mitt Romney -- clearly suffering from acute political delirium -- described Dick Cheney as "a man of wisdom and judgment." Pat Robertson, exhibiting all the signs of stage 4 moral decay, told 700 Club viewers that divorcing a spouse with Alzheimer's is okay because the disease is "a kind of death." Then there was John Boehner's classic case of voluntary memory loss, wherein he called job-creation policies he has supported in the past "short-term gimmicks." A two party system is in bad shape when one of the parties is so deeply sick. Is there a doctor in the house (or the Senate)?

For Voters to Believe Obama's Second Term Will Bring About Change, He Needs to Acknowledge What Needs to Change in Himself

| Posted 09.18.2011 | Politics

While Obama's ideas about the changes the system needs in his second term are welcome and necessary, there is another kind of change he needs to talk about if he is to be believed. He needs to make clear the changes he intends to make in himself.

Fresh Eyes On America: Announcing "Patch: The Road Trip"

| Posted 09.19.2011 | Travel

I'm delighted to announce the kickoff of an exciting new feature jointly produced by Patch and the Huffington Post. We're calling it "Patch: The Road Trip." In search of fresh perspectives on America, our culture reporter Paul Needham -- who joined HuffPost this year after being editor of the Yale Daily News and graduating with a degree in History -- will travel by car, visiting Patch locations all across America. We hope the resulting dispatches will offer a ground-level look at our nation that's utterly local but, taken together, will create a national snapshot. READ MORE For Voters to Believe Obama's Second Term Will Bring About Change, He Needs to Acknowledge What Needs to Change in Himself

HuffPost's New eBook Examines the Successful Fight to Repeal Don't Ask, Don't Tell

| Posted 09.20.2011 | Books

Today finally marks the end of the deeply flawed policy known as "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" -- which for the last 17 years allowed gays and lesbians to serve in the military... as long as they didn't admit they were gay or lesbian. Fittingly, it's also the publication day of HuffPost's second eBook, How We Won: Progressive Lessons from the Repeal of Don't Ask, Don't Tell, Aaron Belkin's compelling exploration of the long road to repealing DADT. And Belkin should know since, as the founder and director of the Palm Center, he was among those working for over a decade to repeal it. His insider perspective gives a unique look at what went right and wrong, and provides a kind of best practices guide for civil rights fights going forward. READ MORE Fresh Eyes on America: Announcing "Patch: The Road Trip"

Announcing Stylelist Home: Your Go-To Site for All Things Design -- and Beyond

| Posted 09.20.2011 | HuffPost Home

I'm delighted to announce the launch of a stylish offshoot of the Stylelist brand: Stylelist Home, a hub for all things design and DIY. Our Stylelist Home editors, along with a terrific mix of bloggers from all corners of the design universe, will be bringing you the latest industry news and tips, with an eye toward bringing design down to earth and spotlighting fresh ideas you can use to liven up your home. READ MORE HuffPost's New eBook Examines the Successful Fight to Repeal Don't Ask, Don't Tell Today finally marks the end of the deeply flawed policy known as "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" -- which for the last 17 years allowed gays and lesbians to serve in the military... as long as they didn't admit they were gay or lesbian. Fittingly, it's also the publication day of HuffPost's second eBook, How We Won: Progressive Lessons from the Repeal of Don't Ask, Don't Tell, Aaron Belkin's compelling exploration of the long road to repealing DADT. READ MORE

Announcing HuffPost's 2011 Game Changers... And Your Chance To Party With Them

| Posted 09.21.2011 | Politics

I am delighted to announce HuffPost's 2011 Game Changers -- our third annual celebration of 100 innovators, mavericks, visionaries, and leaders who are changing the way we look at the world and the way we live in it.

Sunday Roundup

| Posted 09.25.2011 | Politics

This week brought both the exhilaration of watching our country make progress on the road to a more perfect union, and the disappointment of watching it stumble back. On Tuesday, the misguided "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy officially ended, finally allowing gays and lesbians to openly serve in the military. A day later, the state of Georgia executed Troy Davis, a black man accused of killing a white police officer more than 20 years ago, despite what GOP Rep. Bob Barr called the conviction's reliance on "the skimpiest of evidence," and, in the words of former FBI director William Sessions, "pervasive, persistent doubts" about Davis' guilt. The day after that, at the latest GOP debate, a gay soldier's question about DADT drew boos from the crowd and silence from the candidates, who returned to arguing over which of them is most opposed to government intrusion into the lives of citizens -- lethal injections aside, of course.

Will Rick Perry's Extreme Views Make Him Unelectable? What History Shows

| Posted 09.26.2011 | Politics

In the absence of jobs and a strong economy, voters at least want someone who speaks boldly about his plans to turn things around. It's not about the left or the right or the center, nor being smart or being reasonable. It's less about the brain and more about the lizard brain.

More 2011 HuffPost Game Changers: Style, Food/Travel, and Entertainment

| Posted 09.28.2011 | Huffington Post

Last week, we announced our picks for the top 2011 Game Changers in Green, Politics, and Media -- the innovators, mavericks, visionaries, and leaders in those fields who are changing the way we look at the world and the way we live in it. And we asked you to vote for the Ultimate Game Changer in each category. The response has been great, with hundreds of thousands of votes cast. Today we are announcing the Game Changers in three more categories: Style, Food/Travel, and Entertainment. Look over the slideshows we've put together giving you the rundown of who we picked, why we picked them, and how they are changing the game. Then vote for the Ultimate Game Changer in each category. Click here to vote for the Ultimate Game Changer in Style, here for the Ultimate Game Changer in Food/Travel, and here for the Ultimate Game Changer in Entertainment.