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Entries by Arianna Huffington from 10/2012

Map Your Story: Introducing Firsthand

| Posted 10.01.2012 | Politics

With 36 days until the presidential election, I'm delighted to introduce Firsthand, a project that uses all the tools at our disposal to expand the conversation, puts the spotlight on what really matters most in people's lives and allows you to share the ideas and images that tell the story of our country during this campaign season, as you see it. Every month, drawing on reader input, we will ask a broad question -- for example, how a certain challenge or trend is affecting your community. Using HuffPost's platform, you'll then be able to share your response. It might be an Instagram photo with two sentences of explanatory text; a brief video clip; or a scan of a flyer that is landing on car windshields in your neighborhood. The result will be a vivid multimedia mosaic that captures the everyday events that are a testament to the changes underway in American communities.

While Jobs Bills Languish, Candidates Prepare Their Debate Zingers

| Posted 10.02.2012 | Politics

On the eve of the first presidential debate, the focus shouldn't be on who is going to "win," but on whether we are finally going to get a serious debate on jobs and the economy. But I don't expect much, especially given reports the Romney team believes that "debates are about creating moments" and thus "equipped him with a series of zingers that he has memorized." Now, a well-placed debate zinger certainly has its place -- but how much more of a "moment" would be created if either candidate instead unleashed a series of proposals to put the twenty million Americans who are unemployed or underemployed back to work? In fact, the pipeline is full of legislative proposals that would help put Americans back to work. But time is running out. If that debate doesn't happen, then the loser of all three debates will be the American people.

A Wartime Epidemic

| Posted 10.05.2012 | Politics

In this week's issue of Huffington, David Wood continues to put the spotlight on the sacrifices and struggles of America's veterans; Arthur Delaney looks at a NC congressman's very public battle with an unemployed constituent; and Catherine Pearson reports on new evidence expanding our understanding of in vitro fertilization.

Sunday Roundup

| Posted 10.07.2012 | Politics

This week saw the first presidential debate. The main topic was the economy, but we heard more about Big Bird than jobs or the foreclosure crisis. Also missing: President Obama, who was more present on stage with Eastwood in Tampa than with Romney in Denver. It wasn't a bad metaphor for the last three years: one side lying about tax cuts and deficits, the other defensive and unwilling to fight for its own job-creating policies. The election narrative shifted again on Friday when the latest jobs report showed a drop in unemployment to 7.8 percent. Republicans screamed fraud, with no basis in reality. But lest we pop the champagne too soon, remember that at the present rate of 114,000 jobs added a month, it would take over a decade to reach full employment. A celebration based on such meager numbers underscores just how badly we need a real debate on the economy.

Afghanistan: Our Longest and Least Talked About War

| Posted 10.11.2012 | World

In the last month, the United States hit three milestones in the war in Afghanistan. But the one milestone the U.S. has not yet hit is the answer to the question: Why on earth are we still there?

Hearts, Minds and Failures

| Posted 10.12.2012 | World

From Afghanistan, Josh Hersh puts the spotlight in Huffington magazine this week on the war efforts we rarely hear about -- the "hearts and minds" development projects. And Bianca Bosker shows that the universe of online dating is expanding, with people meeting and bonding over everything from retweets to witty Chinese restaurant reviews.

Sunday Roundup

| Posted 10.14.2012 | Politics

"I want to talk to you very briefly," Martha Raddatz told Biden and Ryan, "about your own personal character... what could you both give to this country as a man, as a human being?" What Ryan brought to the debate as a human being was hard work, including the ability to cram all night memorizing his talking points, and healthy habits -- he was well-hydrated and in good shape -- but no depth or wisdom. Biden, on the other hand, brought loads of experience and much more depth. But, in a different way, no statesman-like mastery of himself. He was a 69-year-old hothead in control of the facts, but at the mercy of his anger. In our troubled times, we are in desperate need of real character in our leaders -- which calls not just for intelligence but for wisdom and the ability to navigate not just the corridors of power but the dangerous shoals of one's own emotions.

A Modest Proposal for Debates That Actually Test How a Presidential Candidate Would Handle the Job

| Posted 10.16.2012 | Politics

After the first presidential debate, which gave Romney a four-point bounce, nobody is doubting the debates' importance. But as we ready for tonight's round two, I'm wondering: What exactly are the debates teaching us about the candidates? As they're presently constituted, they don't give an accurate idea of what a candidate might be like as a president. Take the prohibition on notes -- when is a sitting president ever going to be faced with a situation in which he's going to need to make an important decision without availing himself of any outside information? It's fun to see how a candidate responds to a zinger, but it'd be much more instructive to see how a candidate goes about seeking information that he doesn't know. So what about at least one debate that is structured to resemble the decision-making process a president would actually go through in office?

The People Still Left Behind

| Posted 10.19.2012 | Politics

In Huffington this week, Tom Zeller puts the spotlight on what he rightly calls a "national disgrace": the grinding poverty that plagues rural communities throughout America, especially among minorities. And Radley Balko puts a seemingly routine traffic stop under the microscope, raising questions about profiling, civil rights violations, and bad cops.

Sunday Roundup

| Posted 10.21.2012 | Politics

We didn't need the Long Island Medium to predict that the Sleepy-Time Obama from the Debacle in Denver would be replaced at this week's Hofstra debate with a much feistier POTUS -- or that the town hall format would lead to more verbal sparring than the locked-behind-a-podium approach. The breakout star of the event was Romney's "binders full of women" comment, an awkward turn of phrase that unleashed a bevy of tweets, Tumblr gifs, and video mashups. The top TiVo takeaway had to be Romney's epic fail as, eyebrows shooting upward, he tried to nail Obama on the words the president had used to describe the attack in Benghazi -- a dramatic moment highlighted by Candy Crowley's instant fact-check. Before the debate, I suggested that the real-time, crowd-sourced fact checking that has become a staple on Twitter should be made a standard part of the debate process. Candy's sharp memory demonstrated why it'd be so useful.

On New Hips, Old Habits and the Inestimable Value of Giving Blood

| Posted 10.22.2012 | Impact

I'm happy to announce that I've just returned home from the hospital with a new arrival. I'm not sure how much it weighs, but it seems to be healthy, and it's already walking -- albeit unsteadily and with a cane. I'm talking about my brand-new hip, which was swapped in last Tuesday. The surgery -- as well as my blood transfusion the day after -- has opened my eyes and my heart to the issue of blood donations. It's a very humbling -- even overwhelming -- experience having someone else's generosity literally being pumped into your veins. READ MORE

If a Debate Happens Without Twitter, Does Anybody Hear It? Debates are much better with Twitter. And in case you missed the final one last night, instead of rewatching the actual debate, save yourself some time by just rerunning Twitter. Here are my tweets from last night to give you a quick snapshot of the Battle in Boca. READ MORE

Changing the World, One Step at a Time

| Posted 10.23.2012 | Impact

Pushing back against the failures of our leaders and institutions is a growing movement of people and organizations taking the initiative to engage, connect, solve problems, share, and change their communities and the world. We see this in the people whose stories are featured in a new book, Everyday Heroes: 50 Americans Changing the World One Nonprofit at a Time.

If a Debate Happens Without Twitter, Does Anybody Hear It?

| Posted 10.23.2012 | Media

Debates are much better with Twitter. And in case you missed the final one last night, instead of rewatching the actual debate, save yourself some time by just rerunning Twitter. Here are my tweets from last night to give you a quick snapshot of the Battle in Boca. READ MORE

On New Hips, Old Habits and the Inestimable Value of Giving Blood I'm happy to announce that I've just returned home from the hospital with a new arrival. I'm not sure how much it weighs, but it seems to be healthy, and it's already walking -- albeit unsteadily and with a cane. I'm talking about my brand-new hip, which was swapped in last Tuesday. The surgery -- as well as my blood transfusion the day after -- has opened my eyes and my heart to the issue of blood donations. It's a very humbling -- even overwhelming -- experience having someone else's generosity literally being pumped into your veins. READ MORE

Assembly Line Justice

| Posted 10.26.2012 | Crime

In Huffington magazine this week, John Rudolf takes us inside the world of public defenders, who put in long hours for low pay to represent criminal defendants who cannot afford private lawyers. And Katie Bindley takes us inside the very different world of lifestyle concierges, encompassing everything from pregnancy planners to personal grocery shoppers for plastic surgery patients.

How to Sleep Your Way to the Top - Literally

| Posted 10.27.2012 | UK Lifestyle

There's practically no element of success that's not improved by sleep and, accordingly, diminished by lack of sleep. Creativity, ingenuity, confidence, leadership, decision making - all of these can be enhanced simply by sleeping more...But of course, getting more sleep is easier said than done -- believe me, I know! This is especially true in a culture that's wired and connected 24/7. And more and more science is proving the truth that screens and sleep are natural enemies.

Sunday Roundup

| Posted 10.28.2012 | Politics

The week started off with our last chance to have a real debate between the two presidential candidates. But the Battle in Boca was less of a vetting of the status quo than a ratification of it, as Romney essentially endorsed Obama's foreign policy. Why are we staying in Afghanistan until the end of 2014? What of the drones, killing people (including civilians) in our name and with little oversight? Instead of answers to those questions, we got horses, bayonets and Battleship. Midweek brought yet another edition of GOP Inappropriate Rape Comment Theater, this one starring Richard Mourdock and "God's will." The reviews weren't good. The chance for meaningful debate might have passed, but the window for jaw-dropping remarks about rape will apparently stay open right up to Election Day.

De nuevas caderas, viejos hábitos y el incalculable valor de donar sangre

| Posted 10.28.2012 | Spain

Me alegro de anunciar que acabo de volver del hospital con una recién llegada. No estoy segura de cuánto pesa, pero parece sana y ya camina, aunque de forma inestable y con bastón. Y aunque en su día tuve dos hijos sin epidural, esta vez no me dieron opción. Estoy hablando de mi cadera nueva, que me colocaron el martes pasado.

How Hurricane Sandy Downgraded the Election and Upgraded Our Barn-Raising Spirit

| Posted 10.30.2012 | Green

Hurricane Sandy may have been downgraded from Category 2 after it barreled through the Caribbean, but it sure didn't feel like it. What was unmistakable, though, was how quickly and completely Sandy downgraded our election. As Sandy moved in, the election was almost literally moved off the map. But Sandy didn't just knock the campaign off the front pages; it transformed it as well. At a moment of extreme polarization, Mother Nature brought us together. Suddenly the artificial walls that our political process erects to separate us into little demographic micro-groups to make us believe we have no mutual interests got blown away by the massive hurricane. The collective effort, the we're-all-in-this-together spirit, has been great to see. But it shouldn't take a natural disaster to make us tap into our natural humanity.

Come l'uragano Sandy ha declassato le elezioni e risvegliato il nostro spirito comunitario

| Posted 10.31.2012 | Italy

Sandy ha declassato del tutto le nostre elezioni con una velocità l'assoluta. Ciò che prima era una storia da Categoria 5, d'un tratto si è ridotta a mero disturbo del meteo politico. Ma Sandy non è solo riuscito a scalzare la campagna elettorale dalle prime pagine; l'ha anche trasformata. Madre Natura ci ha riunito.

L'ouragan déclasse les élections mais remonte notre esprit d'union

| Posted 10.31.2012 | France

ÉLECTIONS AMÉRICAINES - L'ouragan Sandy a révélé la véritable union bipartisane à laquelle nos leaders n'apportent qu'un soutien de façade. Soudain, dans une campagne où la question principale concernait le rôle du gouvernement, plus personne ne demande : "Pourquoi est-ce que le gouvernement est impliqué ?"

L'ouragan déclasse les élections mais remonte notre esprit d'union

| Posted 10.31.2012 | Canada Quebec

L'ouragan Sandy a révélé la véritable union bipartisane à laquelle nos leaders n'apportent qu'un soutien de façade. Soudain, dans une campagne où la question principale concernait le rôle du gouvernement, plus personne ne demande : "Pourquoi est-ce que le gouvernement est impliqué ?" Les gouverneurs dans les états appliqués n'ont pas demandé de l'aide aux "créateurs d'emplois", ils ont réclamé l'aide fédérale.