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Revitalize Your Diet With 8 Simple Food Flips

02/19/2015 03:20 pm ET | Updated Apr 21, 2015

It's easy to revitalize your diet with these eight simple FOOD FLIPS. You may have gotten used to eating foods rich in calories, fats and carbohydrates because they are tasty. Truth is, those tasty foods may cause more harm than good. It's simple to flip out those unhealthy foods for some really fabulous and great tasting foods.

For example, flip out white bread, white rice, and white flour for whole grains. Whole grains are healthy carbohydrates. "Current scientific evidence indicates that whole grains play an important role in lowering the risk of chronic diseases, such as coronary heart disease, diabetes, and cancer, and also contribute to body weight management and gastrointestinal health."

Whole grains pack a punch of energy, micronutrients, and phytochemicals that work together to promote health and prevent disease, and are an important source of dietary fiber. So if you're not sensitive to whole grains, give it a try.

Try flipping out unhealthy sides like creamy mashed potatoes for mashed cauliflower, a cruciferous vegetable and provides a good source of Glucosinolates. In some epidemiological studies, it shows that consuming five or more weekly servings of cruciferous vegetables has been associated with significant reduction in cancer risk.

Let's get started.

FOOD FLIPS

FLIP OUT White Bread to FLIP IN Whole Grain Bread

1. FLIP OUT white bread for whole grain bread. Turn the package over and read the list of ingredients. The first ingredient should say 100 percent whole grains. One regular slice of 100 percent whole grain bread is an example of a one-ounce equivalent. Eating at least three one-ounce equivalents of whole grains per day can reduce the risk of several chronic diseases. (Be careful here: Even though the first ingredient says whole grains, some breads may contain other unhealthy ingredients like high-fructose corn syrup. It's important you read the complete list of ingredients.)

FLIP OUT Cold Breakfast Cereal Filled With Sugar to FLIP IN Hot Old-Fashioned Oats or Steel Cut Oats

2. FLIP OUT a cold breakfast cereal filled with sugar for hot old-fashioned oats or steel cut oats. These are whole grains and are healthy carbohydrates. A half cup cooked oatmeal is an example of a one-ounce equivalent. Eating at least three one-ounce equivalents of whole grains per day can reduce the risk of several chronic diseases. (Keep in mind that there are some really good and healthy cold cereals on the market.)

FLIP OUT white rice to FLIP IN brown rice

3. FLIP OUT white rice for brown rice. Brown rice is a whole grain and tastes great on its own. No need to add butter. Try it plain. It's simple and healthy. One-half cup of cooked brown rice is an example of a one-ounce equivalent. Eating at least three one-ounce equivalents of whole grains per day can reduce the risk of several chronic diseases.

FLIP OUT white flour to FLIP IN barely flour

4. FLIP OUT white flour or unbleached flour for barley flour and give barley oat pancakes a try. Barely is a whole grain, and barley pancakes are delicious. You may not want to go back to the standard white flour pancakes. No need to top with butter or whipped cream. Top with your favorite berry. It's all you need.

FLIP OUT semolina pasta to FLIP IN whole grain pasta

5. FLIP OUT semolina pasta for whole grain pastas such as quinoa, kamut or spelt pasta. Look for whole-wheat pasta that lists whole-wheat flour as the first ingredient. Most pasta is made from refined semolina or durum wheat flour. One-half cup cooked 100 percent whole grain pasta is an example of a one-ounce equivalent. Eating at least three one-ounce equivalents of whole grains per day can reduce the risk of several chronic diseases.

FLIP OUT pretzels to FLIP IN popcorn

6. FLIP OUT pretzels for popcorn. Popcorn is a whole grain. 3 cups of popped popcorn is one serving of whole grains. Top your popcorn with your favorite dried herbs. Butter isn't needed. Amp it up with garlic powder or pepper. Choose your favorite condiment. (Buy the kernels and pop it yourself in an air-popper.)

FLIP OUT creamy mashed potatoes to FLIP IN mashed cauliflower

7. FLIP OUT creamy mashed potatoes for mashed cauliflower. Mashed potatoes slathered in butter and cream is not a healthy option. Cauliflower is a cruciferous veggie and contains Glucosinolates. Glucosinolates are important to your health. Simply cook fresh cauliflower florets in organic vegetable broth. Drain and mash. No need to add heavy cream and butter. Top with fresh herbs.

FLIP OUT French fries to FLIP IN roasted sweet potato slices

8. FLIP OUT French fries for roasted sweet potato slices. Sweet potatoes are rich in beta-carotene and filled with Vitamin A, which is good for your vision, and immune system.

If you're ready to implement all 8 FOOD FLIPS, bravo to you, but even if you only start with one, that's fantastic. Remember, it's about simple changes making a big impact!

Your turn

Please share your thoughts below in the conversation section. Thank you for your valuable time.

Remember, always check with your doctor or other health care professional before implementing any new changes.

Sources:

U.S. National Library of Medicine-National Institutes of Health - The Journal of Nutrition

U.S. Department of Agriculture | U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010

American Heart Association

Linus Pauling Institute

National Institutes of Health-National Cancer Center

http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm151902.htm

National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health

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This information is not intended as nutritional or medical advice for individual problems.

This information is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for any medical condition. Promptly seek professional medical care if you have any concern about your health. Always consult your physician before making any changes to your medical regimen.