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Bill Moyers
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A broadcast journalist for more than four decades, Bill Moyers has been recognized as one of the unique voices of our times, one that resonates with multiple generations. In 2012, at the of 77, Moyers began his latest media venture with the launch of Moyers & Company on air and online at BillMoyers.com – providing “conversations on democracy” and explorations of contemporary culture, making sense of what matters to us all.

With his wife and creative partner, Judith Davidson Moyers, Bill Moyers has produced such groundbreaking public affairs series as NOW with Bill Moyers (from 2002 through 2005) and Bill Moyers Journal (from 2007 through 2010). Since the company’s founding in 1986, other notable productions have included the landmark 1988 series, Joseph Campbell and the Power of Myth, as well as Healing and the Mind, The Language of Life, Genesis, On Our Own Terms: Moyers on Dying, Moyers on Addiction: Close to Home, America’s First River, Becoming American: The Chinese Experience, Faith & Reason, and Moyers on America.

Moyers began his journalism career at age 16 as a cub reporter for his hometown daily newspaper in Marshall, Texas. He was a founding organizer and deputy director of the Peace Corps and special assistant to President Lyndon B. Johnson. Moyers served as Johnson’s press secretary from 1965 to 1967.

As publisher of Newsday from 1967 to 1970, Moyers brought aboard writers including Pete Hamill, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, and Saul Bellow, and led the paper to two Pulitzer Prizes. In 1976, he was the senior correspondent for the distinguished documentary series CBS Reports and later a senior news analyst for The CBS Evening News.

For his work, Bill Moyers has received more than 30 Emmys, two prestigious Alfred I. Dupont-Columbia University Awards, nine Peabodys, and three George Polk Awards. In the first year it was bestowed, Moyers received the prestigious Honorary Doctor of Fine Arts by the American Film Institute. A Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he also received the Career Achievement Award from the International Documentary Association and has been honored by the Television Critics Association for outstanding career achievement.

Moyers was elected to the Television Hall of Fame in 1995. A year later he received the Charles Frankel Prize (now the National Humanities Medal) from the National Endowment for the Humanities “for outstanding contributions to American cultural life.” In 2005, Moyers received the PEN USA Courageous Advocacy Award for his passionate, outspoken commitment to freedom of speech and his dedication to journalistic integrity. He has also been honored with the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences’ Lifetime Achievement Award.

The Museum of Broadcast Communications calls Moyers, “One of the few broadcast journalists who might be said to approach the stature of Edward R. Murrow. If Murrow founded broadcast journalism, Moyers significantly extended its traditions.”

Moyers’ books include such bestsellers as Listening to America, The Power of Myth, Healing and the Mind, The Language of Life, Moyers on America: A Journalist and His Times, and Moyers on Democracy. His most recent book, Bill Moyers Journal: The Conversation Continues, was published in May 2011. He currently serves as president of the Schumann Media Center, a non-profit organization that supports independent journalism.

Married for more than 55 years, Judith and Bill Moyers have three grown children and five grandchildren.

Entries by Bill Moyers

WATCH: Restoring an America That Has Lost Its Way

(4) Comments | Posted October 14, 2014 | 1:11 PM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com.

Three years ago, reporter and former New York Times columnist Bob Herbert took to the road and traveled across the United States to gather research for his new book, Losing Our Way. In it, Herbert tells the stories of the brave, hard-working men and women he met who have been battered by the economic downturn. He found an America in which jobs have disappeared, infrastructure is falling apart and the "virtuous cycle" of well-paid workers spending their wages to power the economy has been broken by greed and the gap between the very rich and everyone else.

He tells me:

"[W]e've established a power structure in which the great corporations and the big banks have allied themselves with the national government and, in many cases, local government to pursue corporate interests and financial interests as opposed to those things that would be in the best interests of ordinary working people... Once you do that, you lose the dynamic that America is supposed to be. It's supposed to be an egalitarian society, a society of rising standards of living, a society of a vast and thriving middle class. And we are getting farther and farther away from that ideal."

As for solutions, Herbert says, "People need to start voting against the excessive power of the great moneyed interests. But more than that, we need a movement, a grass-roots movement that will fight for the interests of ordinary men and women..."

Herbert is a senior distinguished fellow at the public policy and analysis think tank, Demos. He is also a board member of the Schumann Media Center, from which he is presently on leave working on a major documentary.

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Watch: Too Big to Jail?

(8) Comments | Posted October 6, 2014 | 11:09 AM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com.

Attorney General Eric Holder's resignation last week reminds us of an infuriating fact: No banking executives have been criminally prosecuted for their role in causing the biggest financial disaster since the Great Depression.

"I blame Holder. I blame Timothy Geithner," veteran bank regulator William K. Black tells me this week. "But they are fulfilling administration policies. The problem definitely comes from the top. And remember, Obama wouldn't have been president but for the financial contribution of bankers."

And the rub? While large banks have been penalized for their role in the housing meltdown, the costs of those fines will be largely borne by shareholders and taxpayers as the banks write off the fines as the cost of doing business. And by and large these top executives got to keep their massive bonuses and compensation, despite the fallout.

But the story gets even more infuriating, the more Black lays bare the culture of corruption that led to the meltdown.

"The Clinton, Bush and Obama administrations all could have prevented [the financial meltdown]," Black tells me. And what's worse, Black -- who exposed the so-called Keating Five -- believes the next crisis is coming: "We have created the incentive structures that [are] going to produce a much larger disaster."

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Watch: America's New War in the Middle East

(0) Comments | Posted September 29, 2014 | 1:06 PM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com.

As Congress skipped town and avoided a vote on war, President Obama announced this week that the US was taking the lead in bombing jihadists in Iraq and Syria, opening what is being widely interpreted as another long and costly American military campaign in the Middle East.

This week, I discuss the latest on the conflict with Jonathan Landay, a veteran national security reporter for McClatchy Newspapers and Matthew Hoh, a former Marine and foreign service officer in Afghanistan.

"As much as President Obama wishes we weren't the world's policemen, perhaps we are," Landay tells me. "And there's no escaping that curse."

Hoh, who resigned in protest from his post in Afghanistan over US strategic policy there, adds: "Is this really our model for the Middle East that we are going to bomb countries, continuously, take part in civil wars, sometimes supporting one side, maybe supporting the other, with no means or no real desire or effort to achieve a peace?"

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Watch: Climate Change, The Next Generation

(1) Comments | Posted September 22, 2014 | 10:14 AM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com

As world leaders converge for the UN's global summit on climate and thousands gather in New York for the People's Climate March, I talk to 18-year-old Oregonian Kelsey Juliana, who is walking across America to draw attention to global warming.

Kelsey Juliana comes by her activism naturally -- her parents met in the '90s while fighting the logging industry's destruction of old growth forests and she attended her first protest when she was two months old.

Now just out of high school, she's co-plaintiff in a major lawsuit being spearheaded by Our Children's Trust that could force the state of Oregon to take a more aggressive stance against the carbon emissions warming the earth and destroying the environment. She's walking across America as part of the Great March for Climate Action, due to arrive in Washington, DC, on November 1.

"You don't have to call yourself an activist to act," she says. "I think that's so important that people my age really get [that] into their heads. As a younger person, I have everything to gain from taking action and everything to lose from not... It's important that youth are the ones who are standing up because of the fact that we do have so much to lose."

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Climate Change You Can Believe In

(303) Comments | Posted September 19, 2014 | 11:40 AM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com

Just as Sunday's big People's Climate March and next week's UN global summit on climate converge here in New York City, the nation and world are experiencing weather of an intensity that should rattle the stubborn false convictions of even the most fervent climate...

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Watch: Climate Change -- Faith and Fact

(23) Comments | Posted September 15, 2014 | 11:52 AM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com.

The latest in a string of dire reports on climate change recently came from the United Nations' meteorological advisory body, which said that the amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere reached a new record high in 2013, due to a "surge" in carbon...

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Watch: Elizabeth Warren on Fighting Back Against Wall Street Giants

(22) Comments | Posted September 8, 2014 | 11:48 AM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com.

In Oklahoma, Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and her brothers grew up in "an America that invested in kids like us and helped build a future where we could flourish." But, as she writes in her memoir, A Fighting Chance, "Today the game...

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Politicians Show Their Gratitude Where It Count$

(21) Comments | Posted September 3, 2014 | 12:00 PM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com

There shall be eternal summer in the grateful heart, a poet wrote, and as this year's summer winds toward its end and elections approach, gratitude is indeed what our politicians have flowing from that space where their hearts should be.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch...

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Watch: Maya Angelou on Facing Evil

(3) Comments | Posted August 19, 2014 | 9:58 AM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com.

In this second of two programs celebrating the life and work of the late Maya Angelou, I revisit a 1988 documentary in which Angelou and I attended a conference on "Facing Evil," held in the Hill Country of central Texas. Evil was a topic about which Angelou, the victim of childhood rape and virulent racism, had a lot to say.

Rape caused her to retreat into silence for five years, she said, and was:

"a dire kind of evil, because rape on the body of a young person more often than not introduces cynicism, and there is nothing quite so tragic as a young cynic, because it means the person has gone from knowing nothing to believing nothing. In my case I was saved in that muteness, you see, in the sórdida, I was saved. And I was able to draw from human thought, human disappointments and triumphs, enough to triumph myself."

She recites the lyrics of a song she wrote for Roberta Flack about Angelou's crippled Uncle Willie, who made sure she and others knew their lessons and "left for our generation and generations to come a legacy so rich. " She reads from the poetry of African-American poet Paul Laurence Dunbar as well her own: "There in those pleated faces/I see the auction block/The chains and slavery's coffles/The whip and lash and stock./My fathers speak in voices/That shred my fact and sound/They say, but, sugar, it was our submission/that made your world go round."

She tells the conference:

"We need the courage to create ourselves daily, to be bodacious enough to create ourselves daily -- as Christians, as Jews, as Muslims, as thinking, caring, laughing, loving human beings," she says. I think that the courage to confront evil and turn it by dint of will into something applicable to the development of our evolution, individually and collectively, is exciting, honorable."

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Watch: Going Home With Maya Angelou

(3) Comments | Posted August 12, 2014 | 11:23 AM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com.

Over the years and on several occasions, I interviewed Maya Angelou, the legendary author who died in May. In this first of two programs celebrating her extraordinary life and legacy, I revisit an episode from his 1982 series Creativity in which Angelou and I returned to the small town of Stamps, Arkansas, where she spent much of her childhood.

Walking with me, she remembers a place where she was "terribly hurt... and vastly loved." Stamps, Arkansas, was deeply segregated, and divided by railroad tracks that split the town into black and white.

"This was more or less a no man's land here... If you were black you never felt really safe when you simply crossed the railroad tracks," she says. "... And I used to have to walk over here. Oh gosh, I hated it. I had no protection at all over there. I had an idea of protection on this side. I had my grandmother on this side. I had the church, my uncle, and all my people were on this side. So I had an idea of protection, but there I would be all alone and I loathed it, crossing those railroad tracks."

It was the great writers she read, the music she heard in church, and the scars of racial discrimination in Stamps that guided Angelou toward her passion for writing.

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Watch: John Lithgow, King Lear and Our Uncertain World

(0) Comments | Posted August 4, 2014 | 11:34 AM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com.

As violent, disturbing images on the front pages confront us daily, reminders of the uncertain times we live in, we're surrounded by productions of Shakespeare's King Lear, the story of an elderly monarch losing strength and sanity, seeking order in chaos.

Why are we so drawn these days to the tale of Lear and his dysfunctional family? John Lithgow, the award-winning actor and writer, is playing him right now in The Public Theater's Free Shakespeare in the Park production. This week he talks to Bill about what it's like to perform the monumental role and its significance in a time of so much unrest.

"When we talk about King Lear, where he fits in our time, we are in a very strange moment. I look around and 50 percent of the big-budget entertainment you are seeing these days is dystopian," Lithgow tells Moyers. "This is the era of Hunger Games and blasted landscapes and The Walking Dead. The zombie is the new, sort of, archetype of our times."

After the broadcast interview ended Bill also talked to Lithgow about the new film he stars in, Love is Strange, about a newly married gay couple who are forced to live apart.

All performance images of John Lithgow as King Lear are courtesy of The Public Theater Free Shakespeare in the Park.

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Watch: The Conscience of a Compassionate Conservative

(12) Comments | Posted July 28, 2014 | 2:44 PM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com.

Politicians in Washington, D.C., seem to have stopped talking -- and listening -- to their colleagues across the aisle, contributing to our virtually deadlocked Congress. While Washington appears to have stopped their conversations, I decided to start a new one.

This week I speak with the American Enterprise Institute's president Arthur C. Brooks, whose political views in large measure differ from my own, on how to fight America's widening inequality.

Brooks says that despite the heated rhetoric of the far right, the compassionate conservatism once touted by George W. Bush isn't dead. It's alive and well at the conservative AEI, where Brooks became president in 2009. Residing now at the top of the conservative pecking order in Washington, Brooks advises Republican leaders in Congress and spreads AEI's message to a wider audience. His specialty, as Newsweek describes it, is "translating ideas from policy speak into soaring moral prose." One of his key ideas: The endgame of free enterprise is not to preserve wealth but to create opportunity for the poor.

"Republicans could come screaming out of the gate going forward and say, 'We're the ones who will fight for the poor. We're the ones who will fight for workers,'" Brooks tells me. "You might not agree with what we're gonna -- how we're gonna do it, but let me tell you, you will not doubt what's on our hearts."

I press Brooks on why companies like Target, McDonald's and Wal-Mart don't pay a living wage to their employees who then have to rely on public programs to support themselves -- in Walmart's case, about $4,000 per worker. Brooks argues the market doesn't support higher wages and agrees that the country needs public policies that make work profitable for workers.

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Watch: The Crusade Against Reproductive Rights

(12) Comments | Posted July 21, 2014 | 9:58 AM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com

Roe v. Wade, the Supreme Court's landmark decision establishing a woman's right to an abortion, was issued 41 years ago. Despite consistent public opinion to the contrary, conservatives and the religious right have patiently and relentlessly campaigned against it for decades. And recently, their efforts are finding some success. Two major rulings by the Supreme Court this last session limited health insurance coverage for contraception and gave protesters increased rights to demonstrate outside abortion clinics. Several states -- especially in the South -- in the name, legislators say, of women's health, have passed regulations that creatively use technicalities to force clinics to close.

I talk about the politics of reproductive freedom with Cecile Richards, president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America and the Planned Parenthood Action Fund. For nearly a century, Planned Parenthood has been the leading advocate for reproductive health care in the United States, with 69 affiliates nationwide, operating more than 700 health centers.

"It's better to be a corporation today than to be a woman in front of the Supreme Court," Richards tells me. "I think that the Hobby Lobby decision is just the beginning of giving corporations free license to obey those rules and laws that they agree with, and not ones that they don't."

Richards has been an organizer of low-wage janitors, hotel and health care workers, the founder of the Texas Freedom Network, which defends civil liberties and religious freedom in her native state, and a deputy chief of staff to the Democratic leader in the House, Nancy Pelosi.

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Watch: Is the Supreme Court Out of Order?

(8) Comments | Posted July 15, 2014 | 11:46 AM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com

The latest session of the US Supreme Court was especially contentious, with important decisions on the separation of church and state, organized labor, campaign finance reform, birth control and women's health, among others, splitting the court along its 5-4 conservative-liberal divide.

On the other hand, nearly two-thirds of the court's decisions this term were unanimous -- the first time that's happened in more than 60 years. But there's more to that seeming unanimity than meets the eye: In some instances, conservative justices went along but expressed their wish that the court had gone even further to the right, and many believe that some of the decisions might simply be a preliminary step toward a more significant breaking of legal precedent in years to come.

This week I speak with Linda Greenhouse, a New York Times columnist, and Dahlia Lithwick, a senior editor at Slate, about the latest rulings from the Supreme Court, a beat they've both covered for years.

"You can't look at the Roberts court and say that they've done anything other than systematically unravel voting rights, women's rights, workers' rights [and] environmental progress," Lithwick tells me.

Greenhouse adds: "I think it's hard for anybody looking at this court objectively to come away not thinking that it's a court in pursuit of an agenda."

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Celebrate the Revolution -- And Keep It Going

(38) Comments | Posted July 3, 2014 | 11:56 PM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com

This post is co-written by Bill Moyers and Bernard Weisberger.

The Glorious Fourth is a day to let 'er rip, be as red-white-and-blue as you like, hang out the flag, join the parade, keep an eye on the sky where those...

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What We Can Learn From Lawrence of Arabia

(15) Comments | Posted June 30, 2014 | 11:02 AM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com.

As fears grow of a widening war across the Middle East, fed by reports that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) envisions a region-wide, all controlling theocracy, we found ourselves talking about another war. The Great War -- or World War I,...

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Watch: Andrew Bacevich on the Chaos in Iraq

(2) Comments | Posted June 23, 2014 | 11:13 AM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com

The escalating bloodbath in Iraq has triggered renewed debate on how muscular America's foreign policy should be. Speaking about the crisis on Thursday, President Obama said that the US is ready for "targeted and precise military action" against advancing Islamists if needed, adding that "American forces will not be returning to combat in Iraq."

This week, I speak with combat veteran and historian Andrew Bacevich about the events unfolding in Iraq and what they say about America's role in the world.

While some neoconservatives lament that our "world order shows signs of cracking, and perhaps collapsing," thanks to Obama's inclination to engage less in other countries, Bacevich sees things differently.

"We have been engaged in the Islamic world at least since 1980, in a military project based on the assumption that the adroit use of American hard power can somehow pacify or fix this part of the world. We can now examine more than three decades of this effort.

Let's look at what U.S. military intervention in Iraq has achieved, in Afghanistan has achieved, in Somalia has achieved, in Lebanon has achieved, in Libya has achieved. I mean, ask ourselves the very simple question. Is the region becoming more stable? Is it becoming more democratic? Are we alleviating, reducing the prevalence of anti-Americanism?"

After the full broadcast interview, I so enjoyed my conversation with Bacevich that we kept talking, delving topics such as the Vietnam War, our evolving relationship with Iran and neoconservatives views on US foreign policy. Watch the extended interview.


Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Watch: Wall Street's Secret Weapon: Congress

(2) Comments | Posted June 16, 2014 | 10:35 AM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com.

Why haven't any big bankers been prosecuted for their role in the housing crisis that led to the Great Recession?

These finance executives took part in "scandals that violate the most basic ethical norms," as the head of the IMF Christine Lagarde put it last month, including illegal foreclosures, money laundering and the fixing of interest rate benchmarks. In fact, banking CEOs not only avoided prosecution but got average pay rises of 10 percent last year, taking home, on average, $13 million in compensation.

These "gentlemen" are among the leaders of the industry's efforts to repeal, or water down, some of the tougher rules and regulations enacted in the Dodd-Frank legislation that was passed to prevent another crash. As usual, they're swelling their ranks with the very people who helped to write that bill. More than two dozen federal officials have pushed through the revolving door to the private sector they once sought to regulate.

And then there are the lapdogs in Congress willfully collaborating with the financial industry. As the Center for Public Integrity put it recently, they are "Wall Street's secret weapon," a handful of representatives at the beck and call of the banks, eager to do their bidding. Jeb Hensarling is their head honcho. The Republican from Texas chairs the House Financial Services Committee, which functions for Wall Street like one of those no-tell motels with the neon sign. Hensarling makes no bones as to where his loyalties lie. "Occasionally we have been accused of trying to undermine aspects of Dodd-Frank," he said recently, adding, with a chuckle, "I hope we're guilty of it." Guilty as charged, Congressman. And it tells us all we need to know about our bought and paid for government that you think it's funny.

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Watch: How Tax Reform Can Save the Middle Class

(4) Comments | Posted June 9, 2014 | 12:30 PM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com

A report out this week finds that over 70 percent of Fortune 500 companies use offshore tax havens to avoid paying US taxes.

In the second part of his interview with me, the Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph E. Stiglitz says that such lucrative loopholes are contributing to America's inequality problem and persistent unemployment rate. In fact, corporate greed, combined with a tax code too biased toward the very rich, is hurting our economy and reducing public investment at a time when we really need it.

Stiglitz says it doesn't have to be this way. He has a new plan for overhauling America's current tax system, which he believes contributes to making America the most unequal society of the advanced countries.

"We can have a tax system that can help create a fairer society," Stiglitz tells me in the second part of our conversation. "Only ask the people at the top to pay their fair share. It's not asking a lot. It's just saying the top 1% shouldn't be paying a lower tax rate than somebody much further down the scale - [they] shouldn't have the opportunity to move money offshore and keep it in an unlimited IRA account."

Stiglitz believes that taxes should incentivize corporations to act in ways that benefit our country. "If your taxes say we want to encourage real investments in America, then you get real investment in America... But I also believe that you have to shape incentives and that markets on their own don't necessarily shape them the right way."

The economist concludes that the barriers to solving our problems are political, not economic, and we can change what's wrong if enough of us insist.

Watch part one of Bill's interview with Stiglitz.

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Watch: Joseph E. Stiglitz Calls for Fair Taxes for All

(2) Comments | Posted June 2, 2014 | 10:34 AM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com.

A new report by Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph E. Stiglitz for the Roosevelt Institute suggests that paying our fair share of taxes and cracking down on corporate tax dodgers could be a cure for inequality and a faltering economy.

This week on Moyers & Company, Stiglitz tells me that Apple, Google, GE and a host of other Fortune 500 companies are creating what amounts to "an unlimited IRA for corporations." The result? Vast amounts of lost revenue for our treasury and the exporting of much-needed jobs to other countries.

"I think we can use our tax system to create a better society, to be an expression of our true values." Stiglitz says. "But if people don't think that their tax system is fair, they're not going to want to contribute. It's going to be difficult to get them to pay. And, unfortunately, right now, our tax system is neither fair nor efficient."

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Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at
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