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Bill Moyers
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A broadcast journalist for more than four decades, Bill Moyers has been recognized as one of the unique voices of our times, one that resonates with multiple generations. In 2012, at the of 77, Moyers began his latest media venture with the launch of Moyers & Company on air and online at BillMoyers.com – providing “conversations on democracy” and explorations of contemporary culture, making sense of what matters to us all.

With his wife and creative partner, Judith Davidson Moyers, Bill Moyers has produced such groundbreaking public affairs series as NOW with Bill Moyers (from 2002 through 2005) and Bill Moyers Journal (from 2007 through 2010). Since the company’s founding in 1986, other notable productions have included the landmark 1988 series, Joseph Campbell and the Power of Myth, as well as Healing and the Mind, The Language of Life, Genesis, On Our Own Terms: Moyers on Dying, Moyers on Addiction: Close to Home, America’s First River, Becoming American: The Chinese Experience, Faith & Reason, and Moyers on America.

Moyers began his journalism career at age 16 as a cub reporter for his hometown daily newspaper in Marshall, Texas. He was a founding organizer and deputy director of the Peace Corps and special assistant to President Lyndon B. Johnson. Moyers served as Johnson’s press secretary from 1965 to 1967.

As publisher of Newsday from 1967 to 1970, Moyers brought aboard writers including Pete Hamill, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, and Saul Bellow, and led the paper to two Pulitzer Prizes. In 1976, he was the senior correspondent for the distinguished documentary series CBS Reports and later a senior news analyst for The CBS Evening News.

For his work, Bill Moyers has received more than 30 Emmys, two prestigious Alfred I. Dupont-Columbia University Awards, nine Peabodys, and three George Polk Awards. In the first year it was bestowed, Moyers received the prestigious Honorary Doctor of Fine Arts by the American Film Institute. A Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he also received the Career Achievement Award from the International Documentary Association and has been honored by the Television Critics Association for outstanding career achievement.

Moyers was elected to the Television Hall of Fame in 1995. A year later he received the Charles Frankel Prize (now the National Humanities Medal) from the National Endowment for the Humanities “for outstanding contributions to American cultural life.” In 2005, Moyers received the PEN USA Courageous Advocacy Award for his passionate, outspoken commitment to freedom of speech and his dedication to journalistic integrity. He has also been honored with the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences’ Lifetime Achievement Award.

The Museum of Broadcast Communications calls Moyers, “One of the few broadcast journalists who might be said to approach the stature of Edward R. Murrow. If Murrow founded broadcast journalism, Moyers significantly extended its traditions.”

Moyers’ books include such bestsellers as Listening to America, The Power of Myth, Healing and the Mind, The Language of Life, Moyers on America: A Journalist and His Times, and Moyers on Democracy. His most recent book, Bill Moyers Journal: The Conversation Continues, was published in May 2011. He currently serves as president of the Schumann Media Center, a non-profit organization that supports independent journalism.

Married for more than 55 years, Judith and Bill Moyers have three grown children and five grandchildren.

Entries by Bill Moyers

Watch: Fighting for the Four Freedoms

(8) Comments | Posted April 15, 2014 | 12:33 PM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com.

If you believe America desperately needs a great surge of democracy in the face of fierce opposition from reactionary and corporate forces, then remembering and reviving the spirit of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, who died 69 years ago last week, is in order.

In January 1941, FDR's State of the Union address made it clear that a fight was inevitable, a fight to preserve, protect and defend four essential freedoms: freedom from fear and want and freedom of speech and religion.

This week, I speak with historian Harvey J. Kaye, author of the new book The Fight for the Four Freedoms: What Made FDR and the Greatest Generation Truly Great, about how FDR's speech was a rallying cry to build the kind of progressive society that Roosevelt hoped for but did not live to see at war's end.

Kaye says the president was able to mobilize Americans who created "the strongest and most prosperous country in human history." How did they do it? By working toward the Four Freedoms and making America "freer, more equal and more democratic."

He believes Americans have not forgotten the Four Freedoms as goals, but have "forgotten what it takes to realize them, that we must defend, sustain and secure democracy by enhancing it. That's what Roosevelt knew. That's what Jefferson knew. And no one seems to remember that today. That's what we have to remind people of."

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at...

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Watch: All Work and No Pay

(18) Comments | Posted April 7, 2014 | 11:57 AM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com.

You've heard about the wave of recent protests calling on fast food chains like McDonald's and Burger King to raise wages for their employees, who are forced to live on next to nothing. But did you know that many workers in sit-down restaurants may...

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Web Extra: Public Schools for Sale?

(4) Comments | Posted April 3, 2014 | 11:10 AM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com

I continue my conversation with education historian Diane Ravitch about the privatization of public education. In this extra video, we talk about the problem with charter schools being run by billionaires, celebrities and individuals with no experience in education; the fact...

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Watch: Public Schools for Sale?

(11) Comments | Posted March 31, 2014 | 6:11 PM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com

Public education is becoming big business as bankers, hedge fund managers and private equity investors are entering what they consider to be an "emerging market." As Rupert Murdoch put it after purchasing an education technology company, "When it comes to K through 12 education,...

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Watch: Who's Buying our Midterm Elections?

(14) Comments | Posted March 24, 2014 | 11:52 AM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com

In the coming weeks, the Supreme Court is expected to issue another big decision on campaign finance, one that could further open the floodgates to unfettered and anonymous contributions, just as the Citizens United case did four years ago.

This week I speak with...

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Watch: No Escaping Dragnet Nation

(2) Comments | Posted March 17, 2014 | 10:44 AM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com

This week, as the chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee Dianne Feinstein publicly accused the CIA of spying on her committee's computers, Bill talks with investigative reporter Julia Angwin, author of Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security and Freedom in a World of...

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Watch: The Dog Whistle Politics of Race, Part II

(0) Comments | Posted March 10, 2014 | 12:02 PM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com.

This week on Moyers & Company, Bill continues his conversation with author and legal scholar Ian Haney López about dog whistle politics -- code words that use race to turn Americans against each other.

Politicians manipulate deep prejudice to rouse hostility against minorities and the government, according to Haney López, and summon support for policies that make economic inequality even worse. And it's not just Republicans and the tea party who have used this "strategic racism" to win votes, but Democrats as well.

"Democrats have understood, even as early as 1970, [that] race was gonna be an effective wedge issue against them. And when the Democrats responded they responded not by contesting that politics but instead by embracing it. And this is part of the story of dog whistle politics -- Republicans shift right and the Democrats have tracked rightward, following them," Haney López tells Moyers.

The two also discuss dog whistling and the debate over food stamps, the presidency of Barack Obama and the rise of the tea party, as well as the origins of this election strategy. Haney López also tells Bill that he expects the racial provocations will evolve to target members of the Latino and Asian communities in the coming years.

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Watch: Ian Haney López on the Dog Whistle Politics of Race

(5) Comments | Posted March 4, 2014 | 9:02 AM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com

What do Cadillac-driving "welfare queens," a "food stamp president" and the "lazy, dependent and entitled" 47 percent tell us about post-racial America? They're all examples of a type of coded racism that this week's guest, Ian Haney López, writes about in his new book,...

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Watch: An Antidote to Big Brother's Chill

(0) Comments | Posted February 27, 2014 | 9:36 AM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com.

In this Web-only essay, I recommend a book out this week by award-winning investigative journalist Julia Angwin. Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance explores how we have become a society in which unbridled technology enables our government and corporations to constantly and indiscriminately collect data on us with no concern for privacy.

I note the striking similarities between 21st century America and the dystopian societies invented more than a half-century ago by George Orwell in 1984 and Aldous Huxley in Brave New World. Perhaps that's why sales of 1984 went through the roof after Edward Snowden dropped his trove of classified documents last summer.

Like Orwell's telescreens -- through which Big Brother broadcasts propaganda and spies on citizens -- our lives are dominated by cellphones, tablets and laptops that are our real-life two-way mirrors. And although Huxley's Brave New World contained some far-fetched ideas and scenarios, I conclude that "all those people genetically designed to be regimented into total social conformity and subservient to the groupthink of the one percent... could easily have walked right out Huxley and straight into Roger Ailes' Fox News playbook or Rush Limbaugh's studio."

Dragnet Nation, he says, is the "antidote to Big Brother's chill."

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Watch: The Surrender of America's Liberals

(60) Comments | Posted February 25, 2014 | 2:35 PM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com.

In a web exclusive interview, political scientist Adolph Reed Jr. talks with me about his new article in the March issue of Harper's Magazine -- a challenge to America's progressives provocatively titled, "Nothing Left: The Long, Slow Surrender of American Liberals."

...
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Watch: The Deep State Hiding in Plain Sight

(25) Comments | Posted February 24, 2014 | 12:31 PM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com

This week, Mike Lofgren spoke with Bill about what he describes as America's "Deep State," where elected and unelected officials collude to protect and serve powerful, vested interests. In conjunction with the show, Lofgren's essay, "Anatomy of the Deep State,"...

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Watch: Bill McKibben to Obama: Say No to Big Oil

(11) Comments | Posted February 10, 2014 | 9:46 AM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com

After the State Department issued a long-awaited environmental impact statement on the controversial Keystone XL pipeline last week, environmentalists and those opposed to the 1,179-mile pipeline have intensified their push for the Obama administration to reject the project.

This week, Bill Moyers talks with...

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Watch: David Simon on America as a Horror Show

(29) Comments | Posted February 3, 2014 | 12:25 PM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com


This week on Moyers & Company, David Simon, journalist and creator of the TV series The Wire and Treme, talks with Bill about the crisis of capitalism in America. After President Barack Obama's annual State of the Union address, it's a reality check from someone who artfully uses television drama to report on the state of America from an entirely different perspective -- the bottom up.

"The horror show is we are going to be slaves to profit. Some of us are going to be higher on the pyramid and we'll count ourselves lucky and many many more will be marginalized and destroyed," Simon tells Moyers. He blames a "purchased" Congress for failing America's citizens, leading many of them to give up on politics altogether.

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Advice to Plutocrat Perkins: Time to Shut Up!

(214) Comments | Posted January 31, 2014 | 7:21 AM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com.

There's a rule of thumb in cyberspace etiquette known as Godwin's Law, named after Mike Godwin, the Internet lawyer and activist who first came up with it. A variation of that law boils down to this: He who first compares the other side to...

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Watch: When Congressmen Deny Climate Change and Evolution

(7) Comments | Posted January 30, 2014 | 1:35 PM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com.

Bill Moyers takes on radical-right Republicans for denying the science behind evolution and climate change, showing a video clip of Rep. Paul Broun (R-GA), chairman of oversight and investigations for the Science, Space and Technology Committee of the US House of Representatives, who says evolution is a lie "straight from the pit of hell" and climate change, a hoax.

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Watch: Neil deGrasse Tyson on Science, Religion and the Universe

(44) Comments | Posted January 21, 2014 | 12:39 PM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com



A new poll by Pew Research has found that one-third of Americans do not believe in evolution, with Republicans far less likely to believe that humans evolved over time than Democrats. That may be why the teaching of evolution to children continues to be an often temper-flaming debate. In states like Texas, some public school students are opening their biology textbooks to find evolution described as "dogma" and an "unproved theory."

While astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson believes all individuals have a right to their own beliefs, he's passionate about what should be taught in science class -- science.

"If you have a religious philosophy that is not based in objective realities that you then want to put in the science classroom, then I'm going stand there and say no, 'I'm not going to allow you in the science classroom,'" Tyson tells us.

In this second part of our multi-part series, we discuss whether science and religion can ever be reconciled, explore the cosmic enigma known as dark matter and the possibilities of parallel universes.

Dr. Tyson is the Frederick P. Rose director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History in New York and host of the upcoming Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey premiering Sunday, March 9, 2014 on Fox.

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Watch: Neil deGrasse Tyson on the New 'Cosmos'

(2) Comments | Posted January 13, 2014 | 11:27 AM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com


This week on Moyers & Company, a new half-hour format with nothing short of the universe itself.

In a multi-part series with famed astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, we explore a variety of topics, including the nature of an expanding, accelerating universe (and how it might end), the difference between "dark energy" and "dark matter," the concept of God in cosmology and why science matters.

"Science is an enterprise that should be cherished as an activity of the free human mind," Dr. Tyson tells us. "Because it transforms who we are, how we live, and it gives us an understanding of our place in the universe."

Starting in March, Dr. Tyson, Frederic P. Rose director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History in New York, will host a new, updated version of the hit PBS television series Cosmos, which made the late Carl Sagan a household name. This time the new series, Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey, comes courtesy of the National Geographic Channel and Fox TV.

Dr. Tyson is perhaps the best-known scientist in America today, a stalwart defender of science literacy as a kind of vaccine against charlatans who would try to exploit ignorance -- and clearly the rightful heir to Carl Sagan's curiosity and charisma. The Hayden Planetarium that he heads is the very place where, as a nine-year-old kid from the Bronx, Tyson first felt the universe calling him to become a scientist in thrall to the night sky.

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Watch: State of Conflict -- North Carolina

(18) Comments | Posted January 6, 2014 | 10:30 AM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com


First it was Wisconsin. Now it's North Carolina that is redefining the term "battleground state." On one side: a right wing government enacting laws that are changing the face of the state. On the other: citizen protesters who are fighting back against what they fear is a radical takeover. This crucible of conflict reflects how the battle for control of American politics is likely to be fought for the foreseeable future: not in Washington, DC, but state by state.

This week on Moyers & Company, "State of Conflict: North Carolina" offers a documentary report from the state that votes both blue and red and sometimes purple (Romney carried it by a whisker in 2012, Obama by an eyelash in 2008). Now, however, Republicans hold the Governor's mansion and both houses of the legislature, and they are steering North Carolina far to the right: slashing taxes on corporations and the wealthy, providing vouchers to private schools, cutting unemployment benefits, refusing to expand Medicaid, and rolling back electoral reforms, including voting rights.

At the heart of this conservative onslaught sits a businessman who is so wealthy and powerful that he is frequently described as the state's own "Koch brother." Art Pope, whose family fortune was made via a chain of discount stores, has poured tens of millions of dollars into a network of foundations and think tanks that advocate a wide range of conservative causes. Pope insists that he is simply "educating the voters on the issues so that they can hear both side of the issues, not just one side." The New Yorker's Jane Mayer, the first national journalist to investigate Pope's dealings in North Carolina, begs to differ. She says Art Pope has shown "that one really wealthy individual can almost rule."

Pope's most ardent opponent is the Reverend William Barber, head of the state chapter of the NAACP, who says Pope is the powerhouse behind "an avalanche of extremist policies that threaten health care, that threaten education, [and] that threaten the poor." Barber's opposition to the Pope alliance became a catalyst for the protest movement that became known around the country as "Moral Mondays."

"State of Conflict" features several of the Moral Mondays protesters who were arrested for acts of civil disobedience during protests at the state legislature. They include a college student who says she's willing to go to jail so that she can "have a future," a doctor who claims the Republicans' refusal to expand Medicaid would "do great damage to my patients," and a 92-year-old African American woman who remembers the indignities of enforced segregation under Jim Crow. Declaring she is now fighting the same old battle on a different turf, she proclaims before a crowd of Moral Mondays protesters, "I am fed up and fired up!"

"State of Conflict" is more than a local story. It offers a case study of what may be the direction of American politics for years, perhaps decades, to come.

Also on the broadcast, good news on the decades-long fight to protect children from the dangers of lead-based paint. A California judge recently ruled that three companies were guilty of creating a public nuisance by manufacturing and selling lead-based paint for home use long after they knew it was harmful to children. The companies were ordered to pay $1.1 billion towards cleaning up the toxin.

"State of Conflict" is a collaboration between Okapi Productions, LLC and Schumann Media Center, Inc., headed by Bill Moyers, which supports independent journalism and media programs to advance public understanding of the critical issues facing democracy.

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Watch: Incarceration Nation

(39) Comments | Posted December 23, 2013 | 1:47 PM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com

There are more African Americans under correctional control today -- in prison or jail, on probation or parole -- than were enslaved in 1850, a decade before the Civil War began. According to The Sentencing Project, an advocacy group dedicated to changing how we think about crime and punishment, "More than 60 percent of the people in prison are now racial and ethnic minorities. For Black males in their thirties, one in every ten is in prison or jail on any given day."

Because of the 40-year war on drugs and get tough sentencing policies, the American prison population has exploded from about 300,000 in the 1970s to more than 2 million today. The United States has a higher rate of incarceration than any other nation and spends billions every year to keep people behind bars. The cost on democracy is immeasurable.

On this week's Moyers & Company, civil rights lawyer and legal scholar Michelle Alexander tells us,

"If we are going to build a movement to end not only mass incarceration but to achieve much greater social equity for all, it's going have to be a movement that begins in our churches, in our faith communities, in our neighborhoods, in our schools. One where people really wake up and say, 'We are going to build a kind of democracy that we deserve.'"

Her book The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness had just been published last time she joined us in conversation, three and a half years ago. The book helped to ignite a national conversation about justice in America and sparked a movement.

Since then, Alexander has traveled the country to meet advocates and everyday Americans working to end mass incarceration in America -- home to 25 percent of the world's prisoners, despite representing only five percent of the world's population.

She has seen a grassroots movement brewing in communities across the country, "There are enormous victories that are being achieved precisely because the people whom we have written off and viewed as disposable are reclaiming their voice, standing up, speaking out, organizing even as they struggle to survive."

This week's program also includes an excerpt from the film Susan, by Tessa Blake and Emma Hewitt about the life of Susan Burton, a former California inmate who started A New Way of Life, an organization devoted to helping formerly-incarcerated women rebuild their lives.

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Gunpowder and Blood on Their Cold, Dead Hands

(705) Comments | Posted December 17, 2013 | 4:31 PM

Previously published on BillMoyers.com

This grim anniversary of the Newtown, Conn., killings, with 28 dead, reminded us of that moment back in 2000 when Charlton Heston made his defiant boast at the NRA convention that gun control advocates would have to pry his rifle from his "cold,...

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