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Bill Moyers
A broadcast journalist for more than four decades, Bill Moyers has been recognized as one of the unique voices of our times, one that resonates with multiple generations. In 2012, at the of 77, Moyers began his latest media venture with the launch of Moyers & Company on air and online at – providing “conversations on democracy” and explorations of contemporary culture, making sense of what matters to us all.

With his wife and creative partner, Judith Davidson Moyers, Bill Moyers has produced such groundbreaking public affairs series as NOW with Bill Moyers (from 2002 through 2005) and Bill Moyers Journal (from 2007 through 2010). Since the company’s founding in 1986, other notable productions have included the landmark 1988 series, Joseph Campbell and the Power of Myth, as well as Healing and the Mind, The Language of Life, Genesis, On Our Own Terms: Moyers on Dying, Moyers on Addiction: Close to Home, America’s First River, Becoming American: The Chinese Experience, Faith & Reason, and Moyers on America.

Moyers began his journalism career at age 16 as a cub reporter for his hometown daily newspaper in Marshall, Texas. He was a founding organizer and deputy director of the Peace Corps and special assistant to President Lyndon B. Johnson. Moyers served as Johnson’s press secretary from 1965 to 1967.

As publisher of Newsday from 1967 to 1970, Moyers brought aboard writers including Pete Hamill, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, and Saul Bellow, and led the paper to two Pulitzer Prizes. In 1976, he was the senior correspondent for the distinguished documentary series CBS Reports and later a senior news analyst for The CBS Evening News.

For his work, Bill Moyers has received more than 30 Emmys, two prestigious Alfred I. Dupont-Columbia University Awards, nine Peabodys, and three George Polk Awards. In the first year it was bestowed, Moyers received the prestigious Honorary Doctor of Fine Arts by the American Film Institute. A Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he also received the Career Achievement Award from the International Documentary Association and has been honored by the Television Critics Association for outstanding career achievement.

Moyers was elected to the Television Hall of Fame in 1995. A year later he received the Charles Frankel Prize (now the National Humanities Medal) from the National Endowment for the Humanities “for outstanding contributions to American cultural life.” In 2005, Moyers received the PEN USA Courageous Advocacy Award for his passionate, outspoken commitment to freedom of speech and his dedication to journalistic integrity. He has also been honored with the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences’ Lifetime Achievement Award.

The Museum of Broadcast Communications calls Moyers, “One of the few broadcast journalists who might be said to approach the stature of Edward R. Murrow. If Murrow founded broadcast journalism, Moyers significantly extended its traditions.”

Moyers’ books include such bestsellers as Listening to America, The Power of Myth, Healing and the Mind, The Language of Life, Moyers on America: A Journalist and His Times, and Moyers on Democracy. His most recent book, Bill Moyers Journal: The Conversation Continues, was published in May 2011. He currently serves as president of the Schumann Media Center, a non-profit organization that supports independent journalism.

Married for more than 55 years, Judith and Bill Moyers have three grown children and five grandchildren.

Entries by Bill Moyers

The Paradox of Paul Ryan: Why the Tea Party's Right to Be Wary

(69) Comments | Posted October 28, 2015 | 9:09 AM

Only in a world where Cosmopolitan magazine can declare the Kardashians "America's First Family" and the multi-billionaire loose cannon Donald Trump is perceived by millions as the potential steward of our nuclear arsenal could about-to-be Speaker of the House Paul Ryan be savaged as insufficiently right-wing.


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A Moyers Recommendation: James Autry's 'On Paying Attention'

(1) Comments | Posted September 16, 2015 | 6:34 PM

James Autry and his son, Ron. Courtesy of the poet.

These days, I find consolation and relief from the craziness of politics, the woes of a hurting world, and an aching back - not to mention occasional intimations of mortality -...

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On TPP, Congress's Cat Burglars Are Pulling a Fast One

(103) Comments | Posted June 22, 2015 | 5:01 PM

"With cat-like tread upon our foes we steal." So boasted Gilbert and Sullivan's Pirates of Penzance as they decided to try a little burglary for a change. And "steal" is the appropriate word.

It's hardly a surprise that Republican congressional leaders and their cadre of Democratic allies spurred on by...

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Hillary Clinton's Wall Street Address

(30) Comments | Posted June 19, 2015 | 12:49 PM

"Perfect! Perfect!" exclaimed a woman looking around at the Four Freedoms Park on New York City's Roosevelt Island as a large crowd waited for Hillary Clinton to announce her presidential candidacy last weekend.

And so it was. Secretary Clinton had chosen an ideal setting to link her destiny to the...

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Fast-Track Derails Democracy

(23) Comments | Posted June 15, 2015 | 10:59 AM

Pro-democracy forces won a big victory Friday when they stalled the top-secret Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement backed by the White House and the Republican leadership in Congress.

But it's only Round One. The unholy trio of Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (who has vowed to keep any of...

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Slam the Door on Fast-Track!

(79) Comments | Posted June 11, 2015 | 8:05 AM

Finally! At last! Bipartisan collaboration in Washington -- and what a beaut! President Obama, the Republican Party, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the Business Roundtable, K Street lobbyists and giant multinational companies are all singing "Kumbaya" and working together to shove through Congress the fast-track legislation that will grease the...

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Turn Left on Main Street

(189) Comments | Posted June 3, 2015 | 3:41 PM

Congressman John K. Delaney, what the hell are you talking about?

In a recent Washington Post op-ed piece, headlined, "The last thing America needs? A left-wing version of the Tea Party," the Democratic congressman from Maryland scolds progressives and expresses his worry "about where some of the loudest voices in...

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The Challenge of Journalism Is to Survive in the Pressure Cooker of Plutocracy

(8) Comments | Posted May 28, 2015 | 9:02 AM

The following remarks were made by Bill Moyers at the presentation of the Helen Bernstein Book Awards for Excellence in Journalism. The ceremony took place at the New York Public Library on May 26, 2015.

Thank you for allowing me to share this evening with you. I'm delighted to meet...

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Netanyahu Speaks, Money Talks

(324) Comments | Posted March 5, 2015 | 8:29 AM

Everything you need to know about Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's address to Congress Tuesday was the presence in the visitor's gallery of one man -- Sheldon Adelson.

The gambling tycoon is the Godfather of the Republican Right. The party's presidential hopefuls line up to kiss his assets, scraping and...

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The Fiery Cage and the Lynching Tree, Brutality's Never Far Away

(270) Comments | Posted February 6, 2015 | 8:58 AM


They burned him alive in an iron cage, and as he screamed and writhed in the agony of hell they made a sport of his death.

After listening to one newscast after another rightly condemn the barbaric killing of that Jordanian air force...

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Republicans and Wall Street Say, 'To Hell With Protecting the Public!'

(21) Comments | Posted January 20, 2015 | 11:35 AM

Since December, Congress has twice passed measures to weaken regulations in the Dodd-Frank financial law that are intended to reduce the risk of another financial meltdown.

In the last election cycle, Wall Street banks and financial interests spent over $1.2 billion on lobbying and campaign contributions, according to

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On LBJ and Selma

(9) Comments | Posted January 16, 2015 | 11:00 AM

Previously published on After my online chat Tuesday, I had more to add to the questions I received about the Oscar-nominated film Selma, President Lyndon B. Johnson, the Voting Rights Act and how government has changed over the past 40-plus years. Read my Q&A below.

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Watch: Democrats Bow Down to Wall Street

(27) Comments | Posted December 16, 2014 | 12:24 PM

Previously published on

Negotiators from the 12-nation Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) are in Washington this week for a new round of talks which they hope will lead them closer to agreement on the trade deal. President Obama has called passage of TPP a "high priority."

This week, I speak with outspoken veteran journalist John R. MacArthur, president and publisher of Harper's Magazine, about the problems with TPP, which is being negotiated in secret, behind closed doors. MacArthur says that the "free trade" agreement will take jobs away from Americans: "I guarantee you, this is a way to send more jobs [abroad], particularly to Vietnam and Malaysia."

Obama's commitment to trade is just another example of his indebtedness to Wall Street for massive campaign contributions. Hillary Clinton, who MacArthur describes as to the right of Americans' political beliefs, may be scaring off progressives looking to run in 2016 as she is "very much in harmony" with Wall Street.

"There are a lot of people who would make good candidates, but they're intimidated by the Clinton fundraising machine."

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Watch: The Long, Dark Shadows of Plutocracy

(19) Comments | Posted December 1, 2014 | 11:06 AM

Previously published on

Some people say inequality doesn't matter. They are wrong. All we have to do to see its effects is to realize that all across America millions of people of ordinary means can't afford decent housing.

As wealthy investors and buyers drive up real estate values, the middle class is being squeezed further and the working poor are being shoved deeper into squalor -- in places as disparate as Silicon Valley and New York City.

This week I point to the changing skyline of Manhattan as the physical embodiment of how money and power impact the lives and neighborhoods of everyday people. Soaring towers being built at the south end of Central Park, climbing higher than ever with apartments selling from $30 million to $90 million, are beginning to block the light on the park below. Many of the apartments are being sold at those sky-high prices to the international super rich, many of whom will only live in Manhattan part-time -- if at all -- and often pay little or no city income or property taxes, thanks to the political clout of real estate developers.

"The real estate industry here in New York City is like the oil industry in Texas," affordable housing advocate Jaron Benjamin says. "They outspend everybody... They often have a much better relationship with elected officials than everyday New Yorkers do." Meanwhile, fewer and fewer middle-and working-class people can afford to live in New York City. As Benjamin puts it, "Forget about the Statue of Liberty. Forget about Ellis Island. Forget about the idea of everybody being welcome here in New York City. This will be a city only for rich people."

At the end of the show I say: "Tell us if you've seen some of these forces eroding the common ground where you live. Perhaps, like some of the people in our story, you're making your own voice heard. Share these experiences at our website," Please use the comments section below to do so.

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Dividing the Spoils

(6) Comments | Posted November 24, 2014 | 10:05 AM

Previously published on

We've been watching Congress since the mid-term elections and reading Zephyr Teachout's terrific history book, Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin's Snuff Box to Citizens United. That snuff box was a gift from King Louis XVI of France. His Majesty was a...

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Watch: The Bare Knuckle Fight Against Money in Politics

(0) Comments | Posted November 17, 2014 | 12:08 PM

Previously published on

In this turbulent midterm election year, two academics decided to practice what they preached. They left the classroom, confronted the reality of down-and-dirty politics, and tried to replace moneyed interests with the public interest.

Neither was successful -- this year, at least -- but on this week's show, Bill talks with them about their experiences and the hard-fought lessons learned about the state of American democracy.

Lawrence Lessig, who teaches law at Harvard, is a well-known Internet activist and campaign finance reform advocate. This election cycle, he started a crowd-funded SuperPAC aimed at reducing the influence of money in politics. Lessig tells Bill: "Our democracy is flat lined. Because when you can show clearly there's no relationship between what the average voter cares about, only if it happens to coincide with what the economic elite care about, you've shown that we don't have a democracy anymore."

Zephyr Teachout, a professor of constitutional and property law at Fordham Law School, ran against New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo in the Democratic primary. She received more than a third of the vote and carried 30 of the state's 62 counties, surprising everyone -- including Cuomo. "When you talk about the corruption in Congress, people are talking about the same thing that Madison was talking about. This sense that our public servants are just serving themselves," Teachout tells Bill.

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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WATCH: Facing Down Corporate Election Greed

(5) Comments | Posted November 10, 2014 | 4:51 PM

Previously published on

In the midst of the midterm elections and the obsession with which party would control the US Senate, there were races at the local and state level with deeper implications for the future of the country.

In the small city of Richmond, California, a slate of progressive candidates faced off against a challenge from pro-business candidates backed to the tune of more than $3 million by the energy giant Chevron. For years, Chevron has treated Richmond like a company town and its large refinery there has been a constant source of health and safety concerns.

Since 2007, Mayor Gayle McLaughlin, a Green Party leader, and her allies on the city council have faced down not only Chevron but other corporate interests like the real estate and financial industries as well. This year, Chevron fought back with an expensive barrage of negative campaign media. But on Election Day, the progressive slate triumphed, despite the roughly $250 per vote Chevron spent.

McLaughlin -- who this year was term-limited as mayor but won a city council seat -- and Harriet Blair Rowan, a college student and journalist who uncovered the Chevron money story for the news website Richmond Confidential, talk with me this week about the role unlimited sums of corporate cash have played in Richmond. We discuss the great success of the billions spent by wealthy individuals and companies in other races across the country and how to fight back, using Richmond's example as a model for future fights of organized people versus organized money.

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Watch: Bernie Sanders on Breaking Big Money's Grip on Elections

(1) Comments | Posted November 3, 2014 | 10:42 AM

Previously published on

Bernie Sanders, Vermont's independent senator, is angry about what he sees as big money's wholesale purchase of political power. It's a grave threat, he believes, not only to our electoral process but to democracy itself.

Two weeks ago, Sanders visited a town hall meeting in Richmond, California, to fire up supporters of Mayor Gayle McLaughlin and a slate of progressive city council candidates. They're running against a ticket backed by the energy giant Chevron, the third largest corporation in the United States. Chevron owns an enormous refinery in Richmond and is spending $3 million to defeat the progressives, who have charged the oil company with damaging the city's economy and environment.

Chevron's Richmond money -- they're spending more than $100 per voter -- is just a fraction of the billions being spent this year on the most expensive midterm elections in history, money unleashed by Citizens United, McCutcheon and other court decisions that have turned voting into what feels more like an auction than 'one person, one vote.' Because the Supreme Court says money is speech and big business can buy all it wants, corporations are trying to drown out the voice of anyone trying to speak out against them, whether in Congress or a state legislature, on a judge's bench or in city hall.

"Apparently for these guys, owning and controlling our economy is not enough," Sanders told the rally. "They now want to own and control the government. And we are not going to allow them to do that. Not in Richmond, not anywhere."

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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Don't Let Them Silence You: Vote, Dammit

(13) Comments | Posted October 27, 2014 | 11:03 AM

Previously published on

Our country's oldest and longest struggle has been to enlarge democracy by making it possible for more and more people to be treated equally at the polls. The right to participate in choosing our representatives -- to vote -- is the very right that...

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Watch: Keeping Faith in Democracy

(0) Comments | Posted October 20, 2014 | 11:08 AM

Previously published on

Marilynne Robinson's new book, Lila, has been acclaimed by critics as "unflinching," "an exquisite novel of spiritual redemption and love," and "a book whose grandeur is found in its humility."

This week, it was nominated for the National Book Award, the latest of a series of books she set in a fictional Iowa town that began with the Pulitzer Prize-winning Gilead, published in 2004. In addition to her fiction, Robinson is also an accomplished essayist, and on this week's show, Bill talks with her about her fervent belief in the power of grace and faith and her devotion to democracy, which she fears "we are gravely in danger of losing."

She tells Moyers, "Democracy has been meant to remove the artificial constraints, poverty is the huge artificial constraint on human thought and action. In this country, there have been attempts to moderate that entrapment and we've abandoned that."

Moyers & Company airs weekly on public television. Explore more at

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