THE BLOG
03/11/2013 02:53 pm ET Updated May 11, 2013

5 Female Celebrities on Twitter Changing the Game for Women

A handful of bold, brilliant women have taken the opportunity to tell middle-aged male entertainment executives what women really want. Women are tweeting, writing, acting and singing about stuff that we can actually relate to. They're talking about double standards, and self-love and navigating a world that was set up for the other gender. While the following five women have never been grouped together before, they are defying typical gender roles for women.

Whether it's music, television or social media, we can't get enough of these female fire starters.

Mindy Kaling, The Unofficial Biographer of the Modern Woman -- 2,175,829 Twitter followers

Mindy Kaling (born Vera Mindy Chokalingham) won our hearts as Kelly Kapoor, the hyper customer service rep on the show she also wrote for, The Office. Mindy published the incredibly funny book Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me (and Other Concerns). Let's admit it -- we all devoured this book in one sitting. Also, can we all admit we like Fox a little better since they gave Mindy her own show? On The Mindy Project the main character -- an OBGYN -- was inspired by Mindy's real-life mom who was an OBGYN (who sadly passed away the day after Mindy found out she got her own show). No matter where you're reading or watching Mindy you feel she gets you. You laugh because you relate. How refreshing is that? I appoint Mindy as our spokesperson... you know... for all women.

Lady Gaga, The Spiritualist -- 34,743,373 Twitter followers

When photos surfaced of Lady Gaga looking like a normal American woman the press reacted by being typical and angry and calling her fat. She fought back by posting photos of herself in her underwear with no make-up on under the caption "Bulimia and Anorexia since I was 15." Then she invited her enormous fan base to join her in a "Body Revolution" on her forum LittleMonsters.com. Lady Gaga has blown us all away with her brilliant music and her undying support for people who've experienced bullying of any kind.

Lena Dunham, The Gloria Steinem of Her Generation -- 800,880 Twitter followers

Lena Dunham blew all of our minds with the ground-breaking HBO hit Girls This writer easily taps into the larger consciousness of women. She captures what it is that we go through on her show, and it has more honesty about the female experience than Sex and the City ever did. Once there was nothing, and then there was Girls -- out of nowhere! Girls has changed everything for young women. I am so relieved. I was worried about my gender for a while there. Lena made it rain.

Nicki Minaj, Ms. Did It On Em -- 15,946,206 Twitter followers

Nicki Minaj, Trinidadian-born Onika Tanya Maraj, moved to Queens when she was 5 years old. Did you know Nicki calls her female fans Barbz, a name derived from Minaj's girly-girly alter-ego, The Harajuku Barbie (and her style). When you actually listen to what Nicki says in her lyrics, she's talking about real women's issues. She talks about her sense of self -- the fact that she is both confident and insecure. How refreshing to hear something other than "Baby Hit Me One More Time" or "I'm A Slave For You." Don't try to get too cuddly with her, she bites. In this hilarious interview with the very straight-laced Nicholas Kristof she shows no patience for his high brow Vanity Fair interview. Nicki's brand of girl power is fun to watch.

Nene Leakes, Ms. Oh No You Didn't -- 1,076,585 Twitter followers

Nene Lekes grabbed the lemons The Real Housewives of Atlanta gave her and made buckets of lemonade moving on to the cast of Glee and The New Normal. Nene makes no apologies and openly admits she was once a stripper. She talks candidly about being a single mom and being a victim of severe domestic violence. She is the founder of the Twisted Hearts foundation, which brings awareness to the plight of domestic violence against women. Face it, we can't get enough of Nene's smile and her 'tude.

Who are your favorite female celebrities who make no apologies?

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