iOS app Android app More

Featuring fresh takes and real-time analysis from HuffPost's signature lineup of contributors
Brett Baker

GET UPDATES FROM Brett Baker
 

Painters' Table -- Top 10 Best Posts: April 2012

Posted: 05/11/2012 12:35 pm

In a recent, engaging series of articles for Hyperallergic, writer John Yau proposes a re-examination of artists outside the mainstream narrative, a narrative he finds to be "based on the rather flimsy, narcissistic assumption that the art world got it right the first time, with its own obsession with surface and spectacle..." In Yau's profiles of Sylvia Plimack Mangold and the San Francisco Bay Areavisual art scene of the 1950s and 60s, he convincingly argues that these alternative narratives are historically significant and influential in the work of contemporary artists.

April's top painting posts reflect an interest among contemporary artists in a broader narrative of painting. In addition to an excellent Brooklyn Rail interviewwith painter Katherine Bradford (another artist profiled by Yau), many of the most popular Painters' Table posts were those that focused on the work of underknown artists including abstract expressionistCharles Seliger, west coast abstract painter Frederick Hammersley, and the figurative painter Avigdor Arikha, as well as abstractionist-turned-landscape painter Tom Goldenberg.

Enjoy these and other great painting posts below. You can find more everyday at painters-table.com - the magazine of the painting blogosphere.

Sylvia Plimack Mangold: Clearing Space
1  of  12
PLAY
FULLSCREEN
ZOOM
SHARE THIS SLIDE 
Sylva Plimack-Mangold, Floor with Light at 10:30 am, 1972, acrylic on canvas, 52 x 61 inches (courtesy Alexander and Bonin, New York)

John Yau reflects on the significant achievements of painter Sylvia Plimack-Mangold.

Yau writes: "it seems to me that Plimack-Mangold's early investigations of space should be credited with initiating a dialogue in opposition to Frank Stella's stripe paintings, which squeezed space out of paintings altogether, and the flat, grid-like floor sculptures that Carl Andre began after 1965."

He continues: "In focusing her attention on the tight geometric patterning of a parquet floor, or the skewed rectangles of light cast by a window onto a wide pinewood floor, she literally cleared a space for herself. By using nothing but paint to build a believable space on a two-dimensional plane, thereby openly critiquing work widely regarded as upholding a narrative of progress that was implicitly patriarchal in its telling, she also challenged the received viewpoints and well worn tropes that dominate (and continue to dominate) art history."

Sylvia Plimack Mangold: Recent Works was recently on view at Alexander and Bonin, New York.

Read the full post on Hyperallergic
RATE IT!   |  
VOTE
CURRENT TOP 5 PICK YOUR OWN TOP 5
USERS WHO VOTED
NEW! CREATE YOUR OWN SLIDESHOW

 

Follow Brett Baker on Twitter: www.twitter.com/painterstable