Why Must Every Day Be a Hallmark Holiday?

06/29/2015 01:06 pm ET | Updated Jun 28, 2016


My clients want someone to share their moments with.

"I was alone on Valentine's day..."

"I am not a Mother/Father and I've lost mine, so Mother's/Father's Day is a reliable day of sadness, grief..."

I wonder, however, if some have fallen into the trap of trying to capture and script the moment and, in so doing, the moment has eluded them.

When will the day come when we stop ruining the moment because we are too busy trying to capture it?

I read a great piece recently about American Pharoah's Triple Crown triumph at Belmont. The author lamented that the Sports Illustrated cover commemorating the moment depicted spectators capturing the horse's triumph through the lenses in their phones instead of viewing the moment through the lenses in their eyes.

We're all guilty of this. The script has to be sent to the random guy you knew in high school. You haven't spoken to him since high school because he was the random guy. But somehow, you are compelled to let him know all about it.

These seminal moments have to be captured for the benefit of someone with whom we feel apathetic towards at best. Nonetheless, we still pause our lives for the benefit of an audience we do not know and who cares little for us.

Then there's where to find moments...

The best moments rarely happen on Hallmark holidays and cannot be scripted. The moments we remember most vividly are found on that random Wednesday when you catch him or her looking at you, when your eyes meet and there's no place you would rather be. You cannot script that or pause it, allowing you just enough time to launch it into cyberspace. What you perhaps should do is let that moment live in a world all your own that need not be shared by anybody else. That moment is a gift that is yours alone.

Perhaps we should stop sharing it.

As always, I would love to hear your thoughts. Please email me at