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Candy Spelling

Candy Spelling

Posted: March 11, 2010 07:48 PM

Today's New Vocabulary Word Is "Crowdsourced'

What's Your Reaction:

I'm with everyone else who couldn't figure out Lindsay Lohan's $100 million lawsuit against E-Trade because one of the babies in a TV spot had her name.... You know, whatever she said.

But, once again, Advertising Age came to my rescue. I opened my mailbox on March 9 to find the headline:

"Was Lohan's $100M Suit Against E-Trade Crowdsourced"?

I hadn't read or heard the word "crowdsourced" before, but I did hope to find an explanation for the latest silly celebrity lawsuit.

It turns out that Lindsay and her Twitter followers were apparently upset or bothered or something when they saw the spot during the "Super Bowl." AD AGE did thorough research and reported they think the lawsuit was a "crowdsourced effort by friends and random friends of Ms. Lohan on Twitter."

The reporter did his research:

"A quick look back at her Twitter page shows that Ms. Lohan was watching the Feb. 7 Super Bowl broadcast, and its commercials, closely. She tweeted with some shock during the game: "Did that just happen? On that commercial? Or am I wrong? 5:44 PM Feb 7th via UberTwitter."

(I didn't know there was an UberTwitter either, BTW.)

"...that commercial" is apparently the talking babies trading stocks who know another baby, the "milkaholic Lindsay."

(I can figure out what a milkaholic is. I just can't equate what it has to do with the actress.)

I was not Tweeting during the Super Bowl (and I don't think Lindsay Lohan is on my friends list), so I missed what AD AGE reported: "a lot of people were talking about it on Twitter in the aftermath of the spot's airing - with many egging Ms. Lohan on to file a lawsuit against E-Trade." The story actually quotes some of these instigators and shows Ms. Lohan's responses.

I think my favorite part of the reporter's observations is, "But it's pretty surprising that before filing the suit she didn't delete her Twitter comments." Ah, the Tiger Woods effect strikes again.

All right. Now I know what crowdsourcing is: It's a bunch of people giving celebrities bad advice about subjects they know nothing about it.

If anyone thinks I should sue a "candy" company, or complain about anything to do with "spelling," please comment here. I've never been crowdsourced.

 

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