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Viva Bella! Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn -- Part One Movie Review

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Viva Bella! Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn -- Part One is strange and wonderful. Bella (Kristen Stewart) is a young, nubile Joan Fontaine and more beautiful. When she lowers her head, you wonder what she is looking at, or what she is thinking and you want to be with her. Her tiny shuffling steps and slouch are endearing and make you want to protect her against all the evil out there. And there is so much evil.

The beginning of Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn -- Part One is slow. There is a ho hum wedding to get through and a honeymoon and then the suspense starts. And when it ends you will shout Viva BELLA!

Edward (Robert Pattinson) is along for the ride on this one, except in the honeymoon scene in which he breaks the bed. Now don't we all long for a honeymoon with a vampire who ravages furniture? Just imagine what he would do to us, women. Humans. Well, what he does is impregnate Bella and thus complicate the future of this couple and the vampire saga. And keep us coming back.

"It's a baby. Just a little baby," Bella says while clutching her pregnant belly.

"Possibly," Edward says with a side smile.

At this point the Quileute and the Volturi close in on expecting parents Bella and Edward, whose unborn child poses different threats to the wolf pack and the vampire coven.

"They have something I want" should be the theme song of the next vampire film, and these films will go on and on till the universe dries out of blood and red corpuscles turn white.

Jacob (Taylor Lautner) is his usual charming, drop-dead-gorgeous self. When he rips off his shirt in the first few minutes, sighs and whispers echoed throughout the theatres. The cast remains intact from the previous films and performs its choir like function.

The production values are not as good as the other vampire films. Previous movies in the saga had better cinematography and music. This soundtrack is mediocre and at times distracting, but the dialogue is brisk and the plot is aces. Melissa Rosenberg wrote the screenplay which is excellent from the novel by Stephenie Meyer. While the director Bill Condon did not have the sensitivity of the directors of earlier films, the film is worth seeing.

While it is slow going in the beginning, the rip roaring ending makes up for it in blood soaked spades. You will feel krazy-glued to your seat when you try to leave, but don't exit too quickly because there is another scene mixed in with the closing credits that will be well worth your while to see if you want to know what happens next.