THE BLOG

Obama Not the Best Weatherman For LA

04/03/2010 05:12 am 05:12:01 | Updated May 25, 2011

It's a good thing President Obama doesn't moonlight doing weather for Los Angeles on one of our local TV newscasts. He'd probably have to be fired after last week's weather analysis.

In his State of the Union address, speaking about the nation's economy, Obama said that one year after taking office and putting through a variety of stimulus programs to bring the nation's economy back from the abyss, "...the worst of the storm has passed."

Perhaps. But if you happen to live in a lot of U.S. cities, especially here in Los Angeles, I wouldn't put away those umbrellas just yet.

"The worst of the storm has passed," says the President.

"L.A. considering 500 more layoffs," says the LA Times headline, talking about the real possibility of 500 more jobs being added to the already threatened 1,000 job cuts being talked about by City Hall officials.

"The worst of the storm has passed," says the President.

"The daily cost of postponing 1,000 layoffs is approximately $338,000, which equals four more positions that need to be eliminated to generate the targets savings," says L.A. City Administrative Officer Miquel Santana, according to the Times.

"The worst of the storm has passed," says the President.

Los Angeles faces a $208 million budget gap, say the spreadsheets.

And, the President's weather forecast is not holding up for our brothers and sisters in New York City, either.

"The worst of the storm has passed," says the President.

"The sobering cuts the city faces in the proposed State budget...are not going to make our job any easier," says New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg in his own State of the City address.

The President's reading of the weather charts is not very good for the Chicago metro area as well.

"The worst of the storm has passed," says the President.

"...The bad economy has challenged us to do more with less and to even more efficiently manage our limited resources," says an official with the Chicago Mayor's Office of Special Events in announcing that the annual July 3rd fireworks show in Grant Park has to be canceled this year.

In fairness to the President, yes, there are certainly some indications that the economy may... may... be starting to recover. But unemployment is still high nationally and higher still here, in the Los Angeles area; homeowners continue to face foreclosure in record numbers, especially here, in the Los Angeles area; and concern for where future jobs may come from runs high from coast to coast, but especially here, in the Los Angeles area.

"The worst of the storm has passed," says the President.

Stick to the Weather Channel for now, if you ask me.

Charles Feldman is a journalist, media consultant and co-author of the book, "No Time To Think-The Menace of Media Speed and the 24-hour News Cycle." He has covered police and politics in Los Angeles since 1995 and is a regular contributor of investigative reporting to KNX 1070 Newsradio.