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Cindy Letchworth Headshot

Time To Save Endangered Species Act

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Governor Sarah Palin likes the line, drill baby drill. She likes it so much she is suing the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service because she believes the polar bear should not be on the Endangered Species list. This is one example of the travesty we will face if non-scientific individuals start making decisions on which animal or plant deserves protection from overdevelopment or corporate projects.

Under a current proposal, the Bush administration wants to gut the Endangered Species Act. The Endangered Species Act has protected some of our most threatened wildlife and plant species from extinction for 30 years. To dismantle this act now is irresponsible, and clearly another indication of single-minded purpose and poor judgment from our current leaders.

Under the proposed changes to the ESA, wildlife professionals would lose all ability to protect creatures who are threatened by overdevelopment and pollution. The people controlling these important decisions would be federal agencies, such as Commerce, who have little or no wildlife knowledge. By stripping wildlife professionals of their authority to protect threatened wildlife, we are opening the door to disaster. You don't have to look far to know where the real agenda lies. It's a fishing line cast in the direction of big developers and corporate interests.

This new plan would also affect essential restoration efforts. The Bush administration wants to protect only the area where a creature lives with no extension to outlying areas on which they may roam. Without restoration, vital habitat could be lost or destroyed, leaving our wildlife in a vulnerable and perhaps irreversible state.

Because these changes to the Endangered Species Act are considered administrative, they don't need congressional approval, but public comments are allowed. In order to make your comment, please go to www.Regulations.gov. Once there, search for Docket: FWS-R9-ES-2008-0093. When you find the docket, go to the little yellow bubble that says comment.

We don't have much time. Public comments are only allowed until October 14th.