Post Comment Preview Comment
To reply to a Comment: Click "Reply" at the bottom of the comment; after being approved your comment will appear directly underneath the comment you replied to.
View All
Favorites
Recency  | 
Popularity
Page:  « First  ‹ Previous  1 2 3 4 5  Next ›  Last »  (15 total)
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
isis
Job 39:5 - Who has sent out the wild ass free?
09:38 PM on 05/02/2012
So sad. I wonder how the children of the astronauts are.
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
jchowell3657
The Constitution's purpose is to limit government
12:32 PM on 05/02/2012
That's still hard to watch after all these years. God bless the deceased heroes.
12:17 PM on 05/02/2012
All the money government had and has to waste and does and they were beat out by an o-ring . . . . BAM. RIP. I still remember our class watching it in high school; tragic. The country has seen twenty-five years of off and on war, covert this and that, wasted trillions, never mind the deaths of thousands of soldiers and hundreds of thousands of civilains since that day. Brilliant.
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
donaldaq63
Oderint, dum metuant:
12:19 AM on 05/03/2012
And we have no replacement still for the Shuttle. Government fail...
ThinkCreeps
Seriously, it's time.
12:21 PM on 05/06/2012
There's a very good replacement - the Delta IV Heavy.
Another one coming along from SpaceX.

Just as in 1988 when the airforce gave up on shuttle flying as too dangerous for its tools, allowing its employees to volunteer if they wanted.
ThinkCreeps
Seriously, it's time.
12:19 PM on 05/06/2012
And if the procurement of the solid boosters had been less pork-inspired, there would not have been O-rings at all.
12:09 PM on 05/02/2012
I agree that Hope's reactions, and the the prayer at the end are what make this video so extraordinary.I was teaching in Houston at the time, and the Johnson Space Center was located within my school district. One of my colleagues was the wife of an astronaut who had just gone up in the shuttle before Challenger. Being unaware of what had just taken place, I saw her in the hall and she looked upset. I asked her if she was OK and she said, "The shuttle exploded." I couldn't wrap my head around that so I said, "You mean on the launch pad with no one in it." If only.
photo
Kailuabred
Life is Awesome!
12:04 PM on 05/02/2012
Waste of time. Nothing new here at all.
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
vobox3343
Each day is a new day - make the most of it
11:29 AM on 05/02/2012
Wow, Vincent Van Gogh was in tune with the universe - Who knew? That one shot was about as close to his "Starry Nights" painting as you can possibly get.
10:29 AM on 05/02/2012
There is nothing new about this footage. I have seen this many times before. HuffPost needs to stop doing this.
legalaid
Was a liberal, but then I came to my senses.
11:57 AM on 05/02/2012
HP just does this to get more pageviews. More pageviews mean more advertising dollars for HP.
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
donaldaq63
Oderint, dum metuant:
12:19 AM on 05/03/2012
Brought to you by Carl's JR.
photo
yauxeybalba
“Thinking is a crime." GO
10:09 AM on 05/02/2012
Christa McAuliffe came from just down the road from our camp and is still remembered and honored here. "To reach for the stars is to touch the face of God."
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
donaldaq63
Oderint, dum metuant:
12:20 AM on 05/03/2012
Or the ocean's floor. Little difference.
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
MekhongKurt
09:32 AM on 05/02/2012
Only a handful of events are etched as deeply into my memory over my past nearly 61 years now as the Challenger tragedy. The obvious one, the JFK assassination. In my case, the launch of Sputnik 1 when I was just six and then actually SEEING it above the family ranch as it orbited (or see its trailing launch stage, actually, though i didn't know it at the time and was too young to be scared anyway). The launch of Alan Shepard. The first Moon landing.

Since the Challenger? -- nothing. Even the terrible tragedy of the Columbia Space Shuttle didn't seem *quite* as horrific -- at least that crew died far more quickly than did the crew on the Challenger, who may have been at least partly aware (though we'll never know).

Yes, were I to live a thousand very long lifetimes, I would never forget. . . .
10:33 AM on 05/02/2012
How long do you think they were alive?
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
MekhongKurt
10:46 AM on 05/02/2012
Well, srynmichael20, I don't know, of course. I read quite awhile later that it took something like 13-14 minutes for crew cabin, which survived largely intact after the O-ring failure and resulting explosion, to hit the water. If any of them were awake and aware enough to realize what was happening, it would have been one of the most terrible things I can imagine. No, take that back -- I *can't* imagine it. But you get my drift, I imagine. In this context, I'm always reminded of KAL Flight 007 in 1983 by the Soviets. It took the airliner about the same length of time to crash into the ocean -- and there's every reason to believe that everyone aboard had all that time to think about it. . . .
01:05 PM on 05/03/2012
9/11?
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
MekhongKurt
08:47 AM on 05/04/2012
Tony, I thought long and hard about 9/11, which is as deeply -- maybe even more deeply -- as any of the others that I did list. At first, I was inclined to include it, since it was deliberate, as was the first Moon landing. But unlike the Moon landing, the perpetrators behind 9/11 were pure *evil* who committed unspeakably evil, murderous crimes. In the end, I decided to leave it out; the other bad things I did list were accidents. But I was still thinking about it, even before seeing your post just now.

As I said, it sure as heck is etched forever in my mind. So you do have a point, of course.
This user has chosen to opt out of the Badges program
photo
08:20 AM on 05/02/2012
That was like crossing "Grey Gardens" with a NASA video. Weird.
legalaid
Was a liberal, but then I came to my senses.
11:58 AM on 05/02/2012
Mean but funny.
photo
chainsawd2
I always seem to be wherever I am...
03:15 AM on 05/02/2012
I remember this tragedy like it was yesterday. We would watch every launch possible and this one was no exception.

I had watched the news and barely recall some discussions regarding temperatures had been discussed prior to the launch. This information was meaningless to me at the time. I had no idea of the significance of what was being shared to the public.

The launch seemed perfect to me, watching and listening to the television broadcast. Suddenly something didn't look quite right. An empty feeling came over me and then for a few moments I didn't believe what I was watching, then as I saw pieces of the shuttle fall out of the sky I thought that one of those pieces was the crew cabin and inside that cabin they might be safe, there has to be a safety plan, a protocol for such an emergency right?

A sad day for the American space program, a sad day for the families and friends of the crew.

It was also a sad day to see the shuttle program ended, to see the shuttle being transported to the museum in NYC for people to see. A sad day to know that America is no longer the front runner to space and space technology, to not even have a manned space program after 50+years of showing the world what we can do.

How far we have fallen it seems, just like the shuttle and the shuttle program.
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
KelaMa
02:32 AM on 05/02/2012
A shocking and shameful disaster. And here we are all these years later still devaluing the workers' knowledge and experience while letting corporate interests drive our decision making. From NASA to the classrooms--we're still doing it.
photo
Razzer
"Grandfathered in?" Try: integrity, honor, instead
01:31 AM on 05/02/2012
We were vacationing in Florida and were scheduled to see the Challenger's launch. It kept getting postponed (as I recall, subnormal temperatures complicated the launch prep). Eventually we were unable to linger and moved on to Key West (which also was absurdly cold, that fateful month). We were lodging there when the launch tragedy occurred.

We became keenly aware how personal a loss this was not only to millions of Americans, but also, particularly to those living in the region. (We were told even Miami residents were accustomed to catching a very distant glimpse of some of the launches, weather conditions permitting.)

We would not have wanted to be present at the tragic launch.
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
nokaoi
seek the truth, and it will set you free
01:14 AM on 05/02/2012
the juxtaposition of the nasa announcer's emotionless voice and hope's expressions of "dear, god" are chilling.
George Picard
Send lawyers, guns and money
09:47 PM on 05/02/2012
The NASA guy was trained for it, like a pilot in trouble they are trained to stay clam.
11:01 PM on 05/01/2012
The book 'Major Malfunction' was very aptly titled. What stood out was the incredibly complex machine lifting off, that it was needlessly burdened with those engines in the first place (military demanded them), and shockingly all 3 shuttles did not have100% first rate critical parts, leading to pre-flight parts swapping.

http://books.google.com/books/about/Challenger.html?id=ZGDbAAAAMAAJ

Still a sickening moment - space teachers are not supposed to be blown out of the sky.

The later tragic reentering disaster - the idea that a second Shuttle is ready to go for a rescue - many excuses were put out as to why not. Could be it simply wasn't flight ready.