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07:13 PM on 08/16/2012
Frequently it's written "Global warming is here".

Folks don't understand that Global Warming is *not* a place, but a process. Now is hot, sure, but living with global warming means the future will bring warmer, then even warmer, worse and worse every decade until humanity is done.

Silver lining: hundreds of years after mankind is forgotten the temps are expected to very gradually decrease.

Not good.
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Conspiracy2Riot
Go ahead, try and eat that fiat currency
01:49 AM on 08/17/2012
f/f
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Zurichilux
A liberal conservative controversialist
06:58 AM on 08/17/2012
THE HUMAN RACE WILL COME TO AN END IN THE NEAR FUTURE, FOR THE GOOD OF THE EARTH!

Will you f & f me now?
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Zurichilux
A liberal conservative controversialist
06:59 AM on 08/17/2012
Why is it getting wetter and colder in the UK then? I wish we had the US weather right now :(
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chrisd3
Excelsior!
09:09 AM on 08/17/2012
That's the difference between "climate change" and "global warming."

The latter just means that Earth's average temperature is increasing. But that won't affect everywhere in the same way--so locations may even get cooler. That's "climate change."
09:15 AM on 08/17/2012
It works like this... it's not that hard to understand:
Increased emissions of greenhouse gases cause the greenhouse effect, ie global warming. This means that, on average, the world is getting warmer. Global warming in turn causes climate change, which means that... the climate is changing (see, it's not complicated!). Although the world, on average, is warming, it does not mean that everywhere in the world is simultaneously getting warmer. Because of climate change, some places will even get colder. In the UK, the prognosis is greyer, wetter summers, and more stormy winters. Think back to June/July and the record rain levels: it's a taste (only a taste!) of things to come.
06:28 PM on 08/16/2012
Part 2.

4) Reduce A/C use: we push the hot air out of the house at night, with fans on the second floor, blowing out. This pulls in cold, night air. Close the windows during the day.
5) Use manual landscaping tools and get some exercise: A reel mower never needs gasoline, rakes and brooms instead of blowers-- quieter too!
6) Switch out lights from incandescent to CFL or even better, LED. LED's use about 1/8th the power of an incandescent.
7) Buy and use recycled products: they use less resources than new materials, and their function is pretty much the same. I have found recycled aluminum foil to be a bit "crunchy" though.
8) Buy and use an efficient car. Few people really need an SUV full-time. If you buy a smaller car for the family, and then rent out an SUV to carry the soccer team, you come out ahead financially. We just bought a Nissan Leaf, and it costs $40/month in electricity, compared to $240/month in gasoline for a 25 mpg car, plus maintenance.

Before the electric car, our electric bills were between $20-40 / month (200-400 kWh), and we used 1/4 tank of oil per year (use a wood stove for heating, cooking, and clothesdrying during the winter).

If people take action, we can make changes to save our society and create demand for these products. If sufficient, the government may even notice beyond the rustling of donation checks.
10:59 PM on 08/17/2012
Also, wash your dishes by hand. If you do it properly (do not rinse under running water but in a separate sink or tub), you will also use far less water than you would in a dishwasher.
12:28 PM on 08/19/2012
This is one place where technology has improved considerably. A modern dishwasher uses a very small amount of water. Just be be sure to turn off the heated dry setting.
06:27 PM on 08/16/2012
Part 1

We cannot leave something like this to our governments: most of them have been bought by the fossil fuel industry, so there is not interest in losing those funds. There used to be a time when people had a voice in government, but that is long gone.
What to do? Take some positive action on your own, and tell others what works. Here are some of the things that we have done to minimize our carbon pollution:

1) Clotheslines: $20. Very easy to use, clothes smell great, and pull them down when you want to rather than rushing to get clothes out of the drier before the wrinkles set in. They worked in the early 20th century, and they will still work today. Why burn coal when the sun is out? If your neighborhood does not allow clotheslines, see laundrylist[dot]org, and they may be able to help.
2) Solar Hot Water: $2000-3000. There are still federal and possibly state rebates. We have solar hot water in Massachusetts, and we have full hot water from May to September. Imagine how well it would work in the South and Southwest, and without any glycol.
3) Unplug everything that is not used. Standby losses are using power if it is humming or if it has a red light and even if it is not being used. We have a home theater system plugged into a power strip with a switch. Anything that has an adapter is using power.
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Robert Fanney
Scribbler
10:53 PM on 08/16/2012
I applaud your call for ingenuity. But if we do this. If we are to do this right, then we have to do this together. And that means convincing our governments that their current stance is harmful to our nation and must be altered.
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Conspiracy2Riot
Go ahead, try and eat that fiat currency
01:38 AM on 08/17/2012
we'd been working overtime to reduce energy consumption in our home. ripped out the electric heat system and put in a wood stove. when the power goes out, we still have heat.

we built 6 solar panels and a control panel w/ golf cart batteries and rigged we decreased our electric bill by 29% in one year. have plans to build 12 more. also looking to do a solar pre water heater.

last year i learned the dish network converter box consumed 6% of my annual energy usage on top of the package costing 80 bucks a month. we ditched them, got a tv converter/antennae and ordered a roku and netflix and we get to watch nearly everything we ever cared to watch for a tiny fraction of the price.

on top of that we ripped out our yard, added tractor tires and raised beds and chickens and now produce 2/3 of all our own food. a large greenhouse has made growing year round in oregon quite a pleasure. seed saving means no more large seed purchases and i can literally see the health of the landbase improving with the increase of bees, birds and beneficial bugs.

i don't think until industrial civilization crumbles we stand a chance, but you can't stand there doing nothing in the interval. having some clean power, a way to heat your home and cook during trouble times and knowing how to grow, store and stockpile your own healthy foods is empowering.
10:20 AM on 08/17/2012
Wow! I am impressed and inspired.

I grow what I can in my backyard...all organic, and all delicious!

My monthly electric is only 6 kW, so it's not worth getting solar panels yet. But I plan in a few years to replace my car with a plugin hybrid and get solar panels then.

I stopped using my clothes dryer--it sucks up huge amounts of electric. I just dry the clothes on the line.

My yard is xeriscaped. Despite the drought this year and the crazy high temps, I haven't bothered to water, except one day in July I watered my native blue grama grass.
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Conspiracy2Riot
Go ahead, try and eat that fiat currency
11:23 AM on 08/17/2012
i would love to dry clothes outside but i'm on a dirt road w/ a straightaway and people literally dust me out all day flying down the road. i do hang rugs and other heavy items outside, but i also have a newer dryer with a temp sensor so it knows when they are dry and shuts itself off.

i hear you on the low usage for electric and we're really low as well, but we wanted options in the event of hiccups in the system. we can run our freezer and frig and a tv/pc room on them, which is where i am right now.
04:51 PM on 08/16/2012
Climate Change is a reality. It’s time to move towards Climate Adaptation NOW!
Help us building AFFORDABLE AMPHIBIOUS HOUSES for vulnerable communities living in flood prone areas:

http://www.indiegogo.com/CO2Bambu

http://www.globalgiving.org/projects/amphibioushouse/
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Zurichilux
A liberal conservative controversialist
07:01 AM on 08/17/2012
Hilariously (and possibly ironically), I read your comment as "vulnerable communists".
04:46 PM on 08/16/2012
Hi Neil, maybe your cartoon bear should talk to my cartoon poet/journalist Anima Annie. She calls the 1% to task for the bilking of America and citizens on the mat for standing-by while their country collapses in "We the People...Time to Flash Mob Democracy". http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gJzUGbafTms

Plus, I am happy to report that Media Director for the Green Party has just sent out an email asking for social media support for my video:) I hope the answer to "when will people listen?"...is "now" because regardless of party, race, gender or religion citizens need to take the reins NOW!
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Moose Luck 99
GEOENGINEERINGWATCH DOT ORG
04:35 PM on 08/16/2012
Corexit Killled the Gulf Stream!

http://rense.com/MexicoAlreadyDead.html

Gulf Stream And North Atlantic Current Dying
- Gulf of Mexico Loop Current Already Dead

Extreme Heat/Drought In Russia, Flooding In Asia,
Killing Cold in South America All Connected To BP Oil Disaster

By The Earl of Stirling
9-2-10

Our planet is experiencing a real life version of the movie "The Day After Tomorrow" right now. Record breaking heat (up to 39-40C or 100-104F in Moscow) and drought in Russia, heat and flooding in large parts of Asia (China, Pakistan, etc.), and killing cold temperatures in South America are all reflective of a rapidly changing global weather pattern that is caused by dramatic changes in the Gulf Stream and the North Atlantic Current (also called the North Atlantic Drift) and the Norway Current/etc. brought on by the large amounts of oil discharged into the Gulf of Mexico by the BP Oil Disaster.
(LNF) of the National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) in Italy, has come up with some startling scientific findings. Dr. Zangari has specialized in global climate research and analysis. He has found that the massive amount of oil in the Gulf of Mexico, from the BP Oil Disaster, has caused a disruption of the Loop Current in the Gulf. And further, that this has resulted in a dramatic weakening in the vorticity of the Gulf Stream and North Atlantic Current, and a reduction in North Atlantic water temperatures of 10C.
01:51 PM on 08/16/2012
Believe him or not, I don't see anything happening until it's far too late to stop. We are probably at that point already. Greed and politics will stop any progress on this front. So what to do? Wait for the east coast to sink into the sea. Wait till mid america is scorched and un-farmable. Or wait for congress to do something about it. My bet is all the above will happen before congress even acknowedges a problem.
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Conspiracy2Riot
Go ahead, try and eat that fiat currency
11:36 AM on 08/17/2012
meanwhile our military and law enforcement will become more violent in their efforts to quell uprisings and to secure whatever resources they need or want for the dominant culture.
iwrite2
If I were DNA Helicase I could unzip your Genes
01:19 PM on 08/16/2012
Actually decades of data have proven nothing except the climate of the earth is constantly changing...heck even the brightest minds of climate change's models have ALL been wrong and have ALL been shown to be oversensitive
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chrisd3
Excelsior!
09:17 AM on 08/17/2012
Why is outbound radiation declining in the frequency bands that CO2 and CH4 absorb?

Why is downwelling rdiation in those same bands increasing?

Why is the stratosphere cooling while the troposphere is warming?

Why are nights warming faster than days?

Why are winters warming faster than summers?

Every one of these is a signature of greenhouse warming. If you want to say that something else is causing the warming, you have to name the physical cause and provide the evidence. Just saying "earth is constantly changing" is handwaving. Earth's climate doesn't change for no reason. It changes because something makes it change.

As for your remark that "climate change's models have ALL been wrong", ALL models are "wrong." The models used to design aircraft are wrong, yet the aircraft still fly. Simply stating that they are wrong is meaningless. Of course they're wrong. That doesn't mean that they aren't useful.

And as for "have ALL been shown to be oversensitive," that is simply untrue. If anything, they are turning out to be too conservative. Arctic ice, for example, is disappearing much faster than the models predicted.
iwrite2
If I were DNA Helicase I could unzip your Genes
09:46 AM on 08/20/2012
Actually the models for aircraft are amazingly accurate...hence the ability to produce incredible aircraft in very short periods of time. That's because that's real science, not concensus
11:27 AM on 08/17/2012
we call it weather.
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rabidrightwatch
Concerned environmentalist: don't frack the UK
12:22 PM on 08/16/2012
People don't listen because it's such a vast and complicated topic, many simply give up... and many of course, couldn't care less..

In my country (UK) where the CCDs are just as willfully dim as elsewhere, misinformation, smoke and mirrors and downright lies - and of course ill-informed opinion - seems to hold sway.

Their campaign is extremely well funded & similarly couched to those of the tobacco industry, which was dragged kicking and screaming into reality - after several decades of prevarication, misinformation and bluster.. despite concrete medical evidence available to counter their argument.

We don't have decades with climate change; we need to cut across the Gordian knot and act, not passively listening politely to their spurious and ridiculous 'reasoning'...

(getting off my soapbox now).. it's time we invested courage and conviction in the findings of only 97% of the world's relevantly qualified scientists, climatologists and meteorologists.. listening to the likes of Beck, Inhofe and the US cohort, together with Monckton, Lawson and the UK cohort will only divert the collective efforts to mitigate the most serious effects of climate change..

It took six decades to burst the bubble of big tobacco - how long to burst the big oil, coal, gas and nuclear bubble..?? who knows... but let's start right now..
cantabria
my default position is wrong
04:46 AM on 08/17/2012
Their bubble will burst itself when they run out. Drought in Eastern Europe and floods elswhere. Time we had a global network of water distribution. The Romans managed it by piling rocks on top of each other, all we do is look at cost. When the last humans on the planet are scraping around in dust bowls to find some rice to eat, some of them will still be talking about money, others saying "giz a job". We are so entrenched in the garbage we are fed about economics that no action will ever be taken on climate change because there will never be a cost-benefit analysis that clearly demonstrates that saving the planet is worth the cost! The Romans and Egyptians just got on with it, as did the Victorians and without income tax! Nobody would dare to build the UK canal network or railway network now and they did it with a bunch of immigrants working their socks off. There is no vision on this planet any more, only self interest in all quarters - including the global warming lobby who now live off perpetuating their theories. No climate change, no job. It is all so sad.
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rabidrightwatch
Concerned environmentalist: don't frack the UK
05:50 AM on 08/17/2012
inconveniently for your argument, a global network of water distribution is totally unfeasible... at the time of the Egyptians and Romans, the population of the world was less than 1bn and they used slave labour to build much of their aquaducting and irrigation... we now have upwards of 7bn, rising rapidly and pay people for work - inconvenient as that may be, that's the reality.
The Victorians used slave labour too; the starving & destitute population...

So, although it was 'mastered' in the past, it's extremely unlikely that we will mitigate the effects of climate change by a technological approach alone... it has its part to play, but individuals must also take personal responsibility, otherwise...
I'm only pleased that I'm as old as I am... I wouldn't want to under 50 now...
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neillevine
want to go into waterwheel business
11:32 AM on 08/16/2012
So what, if anything, is Washington going to do?
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Neil Wagner
01:18 PM on 08/16/2012
Unfortunately, I think we already know the answer to that question.
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Robert Lee Harrington
I'd Love To Change The World..
11:01 AM on 08/16/2012
Science and reality are not included in the Republican Universe.
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Moose Luck 99
GEOENGINEERINGWATCH DOT ORG
04:38 PM on 08/16/2012
Corexit killed the Gulf Stream now look what is happening world wide!
Mexico is toast. South Africa gets snow. Russia is getting roasted with heat.
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ckdogs
Veritas
10:45 AM on 08/16/2012
People don't listen because a lot of people make a lot of money (think the oil industry) by not listening.
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Neil Wagner
11:25 AM on 08/16/2012
Bill McKibben's recent Rolling Stone piece touches on some of the financial and socioeconomic impacts of shifting off fossil fuels. YIKES—it's not an easy thing!