Post Comment Preview Comment
To reply to a Comment: Click "Reply" at the bottom of the comment; after being approved your comment will appear directly underneath the comment you replied to.
View All
Favorites
Recency  | 
Popularity
Page:  « First  ‹ Previous  2 3 4 5 6  Next ›  Last »  (23 total)
11:05 AM on 03/11/2013
Does anyone know the name of his attorney? What city, what state? Posted Monday 3/11/13 about 8:05am Pacific Coast Time 20th page
photo
englishman545
English Born, Brooklyn Raised
11:04 AM on 03/11/2013
This could happen to anyone, you are not immune....
10:37 AM on 03/11/2013
This has to stop. All to often we're seeing people convicted after some individuals withheld or falsified evidence. It is time from severe punishment of these individuals. A minimum would be disbarred for life from law enforcement or legal work. Better would be, they serve the time served.
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
wetwille007
My [wet] finger is in your ear - pop!
11:42 AM on 03/11/2013
Having them serve the time he served wouldn't be enough time - that would just be an eye-for-an-eye on the time he spent, not the way they lied and made him unneccesarily spend that time in jail, his loss of income, possibly violations of his body while in prison, the smearing of his reputaion(some will always consider him guilty). And without extreme effort he would STILL be in prison. I think life without possiblty of early release would send the correct, chilling message. My late wife was an HONEST cop (r.i.p.) - tools like those guys make the job of good cops harder everywhere.
10:35 AM on 03/11/2013
It makes you wonder what small percentage of the prison population share this man's circumstances but have yet to be found.
imslate78
There is no lie in the Truth
10:56 AM on 03/11/2013
a lot...i just did 19 month with no bond....im still wondering how they got away with lieing and charging me with something i never did...but noone will ever believe me because i have a record...o well i will let God do what he does
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
lovebeingme
11:26 AM on 03/11/2013
A lot!! Northwestern University & Law School has a program they call the Innocence Project. These are law students that take old cases, work on them and end up freeing a lot of black men because they did not commit the crimes they were convicted of. Most of them are via DNA proving they did not commit the crime. Then you have those where witnesses lied, records were falsified, incompetent attorney, etc. And the numbers are so high that Illinois no longer releases information on the Innocence Project's performance as far as prisoners released or money paid out by the State via lawsuits.
11:50 AM on 03/11/2013
So you are saying only black men were wrongfully put in prison? Or that Northwestern University and Law only looks into the cases of black men? It happens to white, Hispanic etc men as well.
PhantomShadow
Quick Witted, Rarely Funny
10:33 AM on 03/11/2013
Pretty objectionable headline on AOL. It says the man is getting rewarded for his time wrongly spent in prison. Send the headline writer to jail and let him see if any money after his release is a reward.
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Wilson Orshal
Never pass to the right
10:33 AM on 03/11/2013
David Ayres is being compensated for the years that were stolen from his life.
How can money alone be just compensation.
In order for justice to be fully accountable, the"two Cleveland police detectives" who "violated his civil rights by coercing and falsifying testimony and withholding
evidence that pointed to his innocence,"Michael Cipo and Denise Kovach.
should take his place in prison.
They will get off with a slap on the wrist.
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Sieben
11:25 AM on 03/11/2013
along with the DA
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
hhijena
10:29 AM on 03/11/2013
The two investigators should be made to serve Ayers original sentence.
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
mraustin
10:19 AM on 03/11/2013
The "good old boy" network is alive and well. Classic example of our police departments across the country. Compensating this innocent man is just the first step. Prosecution of the cops who lied and put him away should be next. A just punishment would be to let them serve an equal amount of time.
10:07 AM on 03/11/2013
However, I wonder if such a large award might make it harder for the next wrongfully convicted person to get review of his case. . .

My heart goes out to this poor guy, but really, after you pass a million, it's just for show.
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
wetwille007
My [wet] finger is in your ear - pop!
11:33 AM on 03/11/2013
After you pass a million it's just for show? Are you insane? Besides loss of income, loss of personal freedom and the social disgrace, God only knows what he had to endure in jail. Watch a few hard-core prison movies would ya!
07:28 PM on 03/11/2013
If he were the only person unfairly jailed, then I'd say, yeah, give him a billion dollars if you want. But at the rate we incarcerate people, mistakes will happen. And we have seen if the penalty for mistakes is too high, cases simply will not be reviewed. That's my concern--a high reward might mean that the next guy doesn't get a fair review.
all im sayin is
STOP organized crime...re-elect NO ONE!!!
10:07 AM on 03/11/2013
And the hair found proved to not be his...we DID have DNA testing in '99, right???
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
December22nd2012
It's the end of the world...maybe
10:48 AM on 03/11/2013
that evidence was withheld from the jury.
all im sayin is
STOP organized crime...re-elect NO ONE!!!
12:06 PM on 03/11/2013
We're on the same page...especially this day and age...why do (some) in law enforcement/court continue to think framing someone is okay?
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
dave778967
12:14 PM on 03/11/2013
The dna testing capabilities now is far better than that of only 5 years ago. It's possible they couldn't get a profile off of the single hair. Not to be the bearer of bad news but this decision does not exonerate this man from doing anything wrong. The case goes now as unsolved and the evidence will have to be reviewed and the case started up as a cold case. I wouldn't be so quick to praise this guy based on this half story we're hearing. He was released and compensated for his lost time because of the horrible things these investigators did to slam dunk their case. Let's see a few months from now if something new comes out about it. Right now the DA refuses to recharge this guy. Completely understandable considering what the police officers did, but I want to see where the evidence now takes them.
all im sayin is
STOP organized crime...re-elect NO ONE!!!
01:06 PM on 03/11/2013
I feel all your sentiment as well, but most definitely, testing absolutely can tell if the hair is or is not his. As far as what happens from here...as you say...time will tell.
all im sayin is
STOP organized crime...re-elect NO ONE!!!
10:05 AM on 03/11/2013
"and the state decided not to seek another trial"

Oh, how very considerate of them...geesh!!!
10:03 AM on 03/11/2013
Where did you people learn the English language? What a cheap headline; 'rewarded'? He was compensated for wrongful conviction and incarceration. 13 years of his life were taken away from him. And, he had to go to court to get this compensation otherwise the state would have done nothing. Reward? You people are sick, if not totally stupid.
photo
englishman545
English Born, Brooklyn Raised
11:08 AM on 03/11/2013
Welcome to HP reporting....
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
anitafeeney
no matter where you go there you are
09:51 AM on 03/11/2013
and in the meantime whilel he was locked up no one was looking for the REAL killer of the woman sad sad sad
photo
englishman545
English Born, Brooklyn Raised
11:09 AM on 03/11/2013
That would involve real policework!
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
anitafeeney
no matter where you go there you are
11:22 AM on 03/11/2013
unfortunately
flysalot2
Pilot: The highest form of life on earth.
11:35 AM on 03/11/2013
Wonder if they could find any real policemen in that state?
09:42 AM on 03/11/2013
I don't think the details of the murder were really necessary. That was incredibly vile, and disgusting...
10:08 AM on 03/11/2013
No point in hiding or sugar coating truth.
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
shnboi
I've gotta clean up what I've messed up
11:19 AM on 03/11/2013
I agree with you. I thought about this elderly lady and what her family has to hear about her murder. They could have left that out.
09:42 AM on 03/11/2013
Regardless of the amount, it can never restore the time that was stolen from him. I can't know the intentions of the prosecutors, who may very well have been convinced that the man was guilty and worked hard for a conviction. Even though such cases are (hopefully) rare, there should be a short track to correct such injustices in the future. When there is credible evidence that someone is wrongfully convicted, there needs to be immediate action to get to the truth, rather than years of appeals and legal red tape. At the very least, the person should be removed from the general prison environment and placed in a sort of halfway facility while the evidence is evaluated. I think every state needs to consider legislation along these lines. What I call credible evidence should be reviewed by an independent panel, not by the same system which originally convicted the person.
photo
englishman545
English Born, Brooklyn Raised
11:14 AM on 03/11/2013
Prosecutors are not interested in anything but winning another case; the innocence of the person is of
No interest, only winning another case. Their questions are more accusations with the person on trial prohibited from giving proper responses..