Comments are closed for this entry
View All
Favorites
Bloggers
Recency  | 
Popularity
Page:  « First  ‹ Previous  1 2 3 4  Next ›  Last »  (4 total)
photo
littlebrowngirl
Brevity is the soul of wit - Shakespeare
03:02 PM on 08/22/2010
Food safety is not optional regardless of price. Eggs eegaress of price should be safe to eat.
12:03 PM on 08/21/2010
There has to be a balance somewhere for the average family. If my grocery bill is $100 and $10 of that is for the 2 dozen eggs I'm buying, then that's an issue for us. Ditto for organic fruits and veggies. I would love to be able to them but my choice is everyone gets 1-2 pieces of fruit a day or all four of us can share an apple a day. Go to a farm? Then someone will be complaining that I'm using tons of gas to drive 2 hours to a farm to buy organic. I got a flyer for organic dairy/produce "delivered to your door". To order the dairy/produce my family consumes, it was as much as a full week's worth of groceries.
This user has chosen to opt out of the Badges program
photo
10:56 PM on 08/21/2010
Grow your own, get the kids involved, they will love it.
This user has chosen to opt out of the Badges program
texastrixie
I invented the internet.
05:22 PM on 08/22/2010
Grow your own? In the city? Eggs and fruit are not something that you just decide to produce at home on a whim. Most cities won't even let you keep chickens within the city limits, and fruit trees take years to actually produce fruit. I do think people can grow their own tomatoes and lettuce, and even some veggies, but fruit is not a one-year committment.
photo
HUFFPOST BLOGGER
Andrew Gunther
Keeping science real!
08:39 PM on 08/20/2010
David nice piece, Salmonella is an unintended consequence of industrialized food production. No one set out to design a system that promotes disease; they just wanted to produce cheap food. However, it is a biological fact that if you keep animals in large numbers in a confined environment then pests and diseases will inevitably spread. Recent research has shown a direct correlation between flock size and confinement and the presence of salmonella. The bigger the flock and the more confined the greater the risk of infection. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20453235
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
jumbotron16
a slight improvement over jumbotron15
04:59 PM on 08/21/2010
This is comforting to me because I keep my own hens and I am a big consumer of raw cookie dough. LOL
This user has chosen to opt out of the Badges program
photo
10:56 AM on 08/24/2010
'Unintended consequence' is an absurdly benign characterization.

This is a depth of obscene greed and inhumanity which Upton Sinclair could never have imagined.

The sob's running cafos are criminals. Plain and simple.
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
rmjagg
pending
10:43 PM on 08/24/2010
yeah , it used to be called ' depraved indifference ' or ' negligent homicide '
06:32 PM on 08/20/2010
Up front Industry cheap food is ill-health, chronic disease, and early death down the road. I hope the chickens and people suit these CAFO's out of existence. On second thought put the operators and businesses who make money on these operations are put is similar cages.
05:28 PM on 08/20/2010
Thanks for this article David. It's all so true and makes me sick to think of the poor lives those animals live and what happens to humans as a result of corporations and greed. I tell people I know that buy cheap food for lack of money-------------to cut something else out of their lives, but try to go organic as much as possible. It's not easy, but oh so important.
maurine meleck
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Richard McRae
I fan awesome people.
12:03 PM on 08/20/2010
It's pretty easy to be a Monday Morning Quarterback. Telling us that these eggs are bad for you after they've already discovered that these eggs are bad for us is just capitalizing on someone else's footwork.

The title of this article is so far off from the truth as to be nothing more than an attention-getting ploy. Cheap foods don't make you sick any more than expensive ones do. Sometimes outbreaks happen. The company responsible for the product should be held liable, but not the entire industry. With the way the economy is right now people are going to be shopping for substitute goods, which means they're going to be shopping cheaper. As nice as it would be to be able to shop all organic, free range, personally cared for, and gently massaged most of us don't have the money right now to double or triple our food budget.

I'm surprised you're focusing on this one company and ignoring the rest that follow the same practices but haven't ever had an outbreak. Are you advocating we stop buying their products too? And if everyone started buying only the brands you buy the demand would be too high for them to be able to be sustainable while still being free range organic. They'd end up having to go to the same model that you hate so much.

The title of this article is intentionally misleading and dishonest.
This user has chosen to opt out of the Badges program
photo
SuperMom101
What's changed on your plate?
03:08 PM on 08/20/2010
HUH?

Cheap food doesn't make you sick... What are you smokin'? This "egg thing" is factory farming at its best. What is the price of your health! I had no idea when I was first diagnosed and treated for breast cancer over 9 years ago (I was only 37) that I could prevent a recurrence by changing my diet. And, thank goodness I did.

Everything has its price my friend. So if we are what we eat...are you cheap, fast and easy?

p.s. And don't tell me you can't afford it. Eat quality and not quantity. Ya know: 2 organic eggs instead of 6 factory farmed things that once came out of a hen's.... Hey...maybe you'll end up looking like tight end Tony Gonzalez. He's the the all-pro athlete that doesn't eat highly processed fake food products and eats free range chickens...

p.s.s. Sorry you dated a nutcase vegan but that doesn't mean the rest of us who choose not to eat factory farmed, growth hormone feed cattle can't enjoy a night out to dinner and the Red Soxs.

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. - Benjamin Franklin
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Richard McRae
I fan awesome people.
03:56 PM on 08/20/2010
LOL This is an amazing run of crazy right here.

Here's the assumptions you're making that you really shouldn't be:
1. That your breast cancer was caused by your diet
2. That I only eat cheap, fast, and easy food
3. That I eat strictly quantity over quality
4. That I don't eat healthy as it is
5. That Tony Gonzalez's body comes from his diet, when every other football player's comes from their exersize routine.
6. That I'm just chomping away at factory farmed, growth hormome supplemented cattle
7. That I can afford to shop/eat like you do
8. That the Red Soxs are worth watching

That's a whole lot of assumption to be basing your entire argument off of. Sorry, but you're going to have to make your argument based on your thoughts and ideas instead of just making a lot of assumptions about me.
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Ron Shook
03:00 PM on 08/21/2010
Well Richard,

I agree with you that the article headline was misleading. HuffPo is getting a well deserved reputation for tabloid headlines, but then what's new?

Does a misleading headline invalidate the basic point of the article that factory egg farming is unsafe, immoral and ecologically dangerous? I don't think so, so you are engaging in just the same sort of dishonesty as this funky headline.

You state with conviction that "Cheap foods don't make you sick any more than expensive ones do." I don't know about that, but I do know that factory farmed foods do make you sick far more than sustainably farmed foods, and a lot, probably most, of the factory farmed farmed foods actively introduce poisons into your life. "Safe Level," my posterior.

You can forget the poisons if you choose, but you can't ignore the huge fossil fuel costs and soil and water degradation of factory farming, so get off your high, cheap horse, and think about eating better. As fossil fuel costs skyrocket in the near future you won't have any choice anyhow, so you might want to start getting your food act together. Your intellect works for your benefit and not just for triviality.
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Richard McRae
I fan awesome people.
04:21 PM on 08/21/2010
First off, you guys keep making the assumption that I eat nothing but the cheapest of the cheap food. Then you immediately make the assumption that if I do eat that way that I have the money to buy more expensive foods. Such ridiculous assumptions to make. Since it seems to be a hinge point for you guys; I am very picky with what I eat.

Now that that's out of the way: Cheap foods aren't any more likely to make you sick than expensive ones. Do the research. You'll find that it's the REGION and HANDLING of the product that has the primary impact on how unsafe something is. Even the rare cases of outbreaks over the years tend to be due to the region or the handling of the product more than the product itself.

In this case it was a specific manufacturer that had a problem. But for that one that had a problem there are thousands that haven't. You are free to object to it morally or in whatever way makes you feel better about yourself - but you can't use this example as a scapegoat for the entire industry. The facts just aren't on your side.

I also notice that all the people in here telling others to basically get off their 'high horses' are the ones who are the most judgmental as to others' eating habits. I personally don't care what you buy or eat. You, obviously, care quite a bit about what I
10:05 AM on 08/20/2010
A friend of mine shared this link with me and I want to share my response to it with you: Of course a columnist and author can afford a $5 dozen of eggs. You are overflowing with privilege and you don't even seem to notice. You talk about money like it's not a big deal (and it probably isn't for you to go from $1.59/dz to $5/dz) and you seem to expect the poor people of America to just shrug it off and be able to do the same. I live on an organic farm in VA (my sister is a full-time farmer) and that's the only reason I eat organic produce almost exclusively. I'm a temp in Arlington and I know that if I weren't living with my sister right now, I'd be buying factory farmed eggs purely out of necessity. I think it's more responsible to encourage people not to eat eggs at all for a spell instead of blowing money on something they don't really need. Schools about to start again and when you think of how many eggs a family of, say, 5 will eat in a week, spending an extra $4 on every dozen just doesn't make sense for someone who doesn't write books for a living. Privilege check, mister.
06:34 AM on 08/21/2010
Thank you, thank you thank you. The entire time I was reading this and the ensuing posts I'm thinking "Gee, it must be nice to have the money to buy farm fresh, organic eggs...even nicer to have the time to go to a farm and pluck those suckers right out from underneath a clucking chicken..." but since I work upwards of 60 hours a week and am the sole earner since my husband can't find work it's what I'd call "tricky". Although I suppose since he's out of work he could spend his days driving around to farms getting fresh proteins and vegetables.

It's sad but true that this kind of food is bad. It's bad for us, it's bad for the economy, it's bad for the environment. It's horrible. I hate that I can't even consider the price tag on organic foods at the grocery store. But instead of making people feel guilty about it, how about all the advocates with free time to hang out in barnyards put their energies towards helping to change the system since our health and well-being is so important to them?

I'd be willing to bet that the majority of people buying these eggs don't even read HuffPost so this thoughtful insight is just falling on deaf ears...but I suspect that's part of the point and the problem...
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
jumbotron16
a slight improvement over jumbotron15
05:03 PM on 08/21/2010
You could get a couple of hens probably. They cost almost nothing to keep and they're cute to look at too!
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Ron Shook
03:54 PM on 08/21/2010
Rashaun,

I hope you realize what a lucky dude you are to have such a sister.

I hear what you are saying. Heck, I live what you are saying, having to eat foods that are forced on me by financial circumstances. That's not, however, an excuse for thoughtless eating and for not developing food strategies that minimize time, expense and poisons. The more money you have, the easier it is to not eat poison, if you're not a farmer, but it's also possible for most of us who aren't entirely poverty stricken to minimize the most unhealthy food we must consume. That's what we should be helping each other to do. This will have a direct effect on the market place.

Here's some news for you. The ecnomy ain't good, because cheap, dirty energy is going the way of the carrier pidgeon. You may be on your sister's farm a lot longer, or at least more frequently, than you anticipate, if she'll have you. The plaint of the early 20th century, "How we gonna keep 'em down on the farm?," will become the 21st century, "How we gonna get 'em back on the farm?"

BTW, you do our blogger friend, David, an injustice. HuffPo doesn't pay him a penny and there's a good chance he has to struggle with food choices just like the rest of us, unless he writes for Monsanto or the like. (g) I doubt if he's as well healed as you imagine.
This user has chosen to opt out of the Badges program
photo
JohnFromCensornati
Wake up! It's 1984.
08:23 AM on 08/20/2010
The pasture eggs only cost $3.99/dozen here (even at Whole Paycheck Foods) - less when on sale.
I consider this to be a very good deal.
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
jumbotron16
a slight improvement over jumbotron15
05:04 PM on 08/21/2010
I went into Whole Foods yesterday and came out feeling like I'd just been raped. I paid $5 for six hot dog buns! From now on I'm going there for meat and animal products ONLY. Who can afford to do all their grocery shopping there?
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
godipo
06:12 AM on 08/20/2010
Aren't factory farms one of the most profound and pivotal bits of our fragile economic system? And don't they typify a vicious circle of big business hurting small business at great cost to us all, in every way?
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Ron Shook
04:27 PM on 08/21/2010
God IPO (what an innovative handle if you have to use one),

You're very good at concise wisdom. You literally betcher life that factory farms and industrial agriculture are literally the pits. Industrial agriculture is the biggest con job of our modern "civilization." I'm an early boomer who grew up on what today would be identified as a pretty sustainable farm in the "50s. A light bulb went off in my head when Michael Pollen wrote this statistic in an article, "In 1940 it took 1/2 calorie of fossil fuels to grow 1 calorie of food. Today's industrial, monoculture agriculture uses 10 calories of fossil fuel to grow that same 1 calorie of food." 20 time more use of the dirty resources that we are peaking out on. Not to mention the quality of the food goes way down. How unsustainable is that?

Industrial Agriculture claims that this is the only way that we can feed the world, a lie of the worst order. There are often substantially increased yields when chemical, high irrigation practices are first applied to good farm land. Over time these yields diminish without increasing chemical and fossil fuel input until in the end the farm land isn't worth spit, and most of the good soil along with the poisons are washed into our waters.

Read Anna Lappe's, "Diet for a Hot Planet," or anything by Michael Pollan or Raj Patel. The lying economics of industrial farming will become perfectly clear.
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
godipo
06:10 AM on 08/20/2010
The viruses caused by this kind of cage system and things like it, in which poop drops from cage to cage, often multi species set ups, may pose a greater threat to our species than any thing else.
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
eilish
Life ain't like a box of chocolates
02:48 AM on 08/20/2010
I've become an organic food hunter. Although there are few farmer's markets in AZ I have found one. I chose a specific grocery store for the quality of their produce, buy 1/2 a range-fed Utah beef every couple of years. I avoid sugars and corn syrup but love honey. I don't dare get poisoning, I have a very compromised immune system with lupus. Besides, I'm trying to get and stay healthy.
01:54 AM on 08/20/2010
historically families have had to spend 30% of their income on food. this is when eating meat twice a week was pretty normal. now we spend 10% of our income on food, eat meat 3 times a day.

clearly our tax money is being spent to subsidize corn farmers who sell their product cheaper than it costs to make it ---> those farmers lose money on their harvest, but live off of government welfare paychecks

this cheap corn and grain is fed to our livestock, including chickens, as well as making massive amounts of the cheap sugar high fructose corn syrup

that is why the value meal is under $5
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
eilish
Life ain't like a box of chocolates
02:53 AM on 08/20/2010
The food is gross and the system is insane.
This user has chosen to opt out of the Badges program
photo
12:30 AM on 08/20/2010
Simple solution?
If you live in an area where it's OK to have them, get a few chickens. They are such sweet little girls and they are easy to care for...if you live in a place where you can't keep chickens, buy eggs from someone who does!
This user has chosen to opt out of the Badges program
photo
03:05 PM on 08/20/2010
Actually, yes, I do raise chickens..I must have just gotten a nice bunch...maybe they are
'hippie chickens', as well. ;)
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
jumbotron16
a slight improvement over jumbotron15
05:05 PM on 08/21/2010
I second that--get a few chickens! :)
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
MerrieWay
12:01 AM on 08/20/2010
Didn't eat an egg in years, the cholesterol myth, so they now say. A Vet recommended eggs for my shelties as a protein supplement. So, I bought a dozen of eggs last week...oh yes, the bad batch. As luck would have it, I read about the recall before cooking one. See ya, back to granny's farm we go, it was fun looking for eggs in the morn.
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
eilish
Life ain't like a box of chocolates
02:52 AM on 08/20/2010
I have two gorgeous Shelties myself. I feed them Ultra which seems to have tons of protein with little filler and they love it. The person who lives with me bought a bad batch of Lucerne eggs, but I read the article and threw them out. He was a bit ticked, apparently doesn't believe in salmonella or expensive eggs. LOL
This user has chosen to opt out of the Badges program
photo
11:46 PM on 08/19/2010
"Cheap food makes you sick" and expensive food makes people go hungry, especially if their homes are being foreclosed on. There must be some common ground somewhere so that hunger and food insecurity become a thing from a troubled past.