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05:09 PM on 10/14/2010
We pay twice as much for milk in our house because we drink organic milk. It tastes so much better. Regular milk now tastes very sour to me.
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TYRANNASAURUS
UGH!....people taste like crap!
05:59 PM on 10/14/2010
TEST HAVE PROVEN THAT THERE IS NO DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE TWO... IT'S IN THE MIND.
07:57 PM on 10/14/2010
I don't think that is true. I accidentally drank from regular milk and knew instantly that it was not the right one. I could do a blind taste test.
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10:01 AM on 10/15/2010
We find it also lasts longer in the fridge.
12:19 PM on 10/15/2010
We have too!
04:50 PM on 10/16/2010
As have I, and a friend who noted the same thing. In fact, much longer.
03:20 AM on 10/14/2010
We get milk from a local dairy that isn't organic certified yet, but uses all organic methods. The milk arrives less than 24 hours from the cow, it comes in a glass bottle with a deposit (no evil plastic taste in my milk - I SWEAR I can taste it!) But it's only lightly pasturized, not ultra-pasturized as most milk is. Turns out this is good where nutrients are concerned, but it only lasts about a week in the fridge, and we have a hard time drinking a half gallon in a week.

Enter yogurt! Homemade yogurt (which is really easy once you get the hang of it) has saved us SOO much money because not only do we not have to spend money on yogurt anymore, we don't waste any more milk!

Better, cheaper... what else could you want?
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10:01 AM on 10/15/2010
Yogurt doesn't work so well in coffee.
01:58 PM on 10/15/2010
huh??
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
ladyjonquil
Politics is the entertainment branch of industry.
06:39 PM on 10/15/2010
I can tell the plastic taste as well as smell a difference. Not a pleasant taste & smell either!
08:19 PM on 10/13/2010
Americans are now rethinking their attitude towards cheap food. They are realizing that eating junk gives them less energy, and makes them less productive throughout the day. Not to mention what eaten too much or badly can do to your bank account as a consequence of poor health. People are realizing that they put themselves at a competitive disadvantage when they eat poorly. They are willing to spend more on food that is of higher quality. This should lead to more small food companies. But more small food companies is not what is good for big business. Now, like the money supply, everyone is slowly looking at that the regulation and production of food much more carefully.

People are buying more food locally..chickens, beef, eggs, milk, honey, apples, and fruit. If we start to have problems when attempting to engage in private contracts for food, then I think it is very important to speak up. The raw milk fight in Wisconsin looks interesting.

http://leisureblogs.chicagotribune.com/thestew/2010/05/wisconsin-governor-vetoes-raw-milk-bill.html
08:03 PM on 10/13/2010
I had the same thoughts, for a while I was buying milk organic and then I stopped because it became so pricey! (I have 2 kids that drink it like it's going out of style). I may tighten down the finances elsewhere so I can go back to organic.
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04:57 PM on 10/13/2010
This database provides easy access to information about various brands of organic dairy products and attempts to rate their commitment to organic ideals based on several criteria:

http://cornucopia.org/dairysurvey/index.html

This organization has filed lawsuits against four organic dairies for allegedly violating terms of organic certification, particularly access to green pasture and purchase of non-organic animals.

One of the defendants is Horizon Organic, a subsidiary of Dean Foods and the largest supplier of organic milk in North America. They allegedly sell all of their newborn calves and purchase year-old conventional calves on the open market to avoid raising calves to organic standards.

The top-rated brands are relatively small and regional. The best-rated national brands are Organic Valley and Whole Foods 365 Organic. Stonyfield also has an "excellent" rating for yogurt and a "very good" rating for fluid milk.
08:04 PM on 10/13/2010
we actually bought a lot of Horizon (the little milk sippers) and when I heard that I was so upset!! :(
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Turtlenews
04:57 AM on 10/15/2010
I do not buy horizon for that reason . Switched to Strauss Farms and organic valley
11:07 PM on 10/14/2010
Its good to know the standards are that strict and they act when standards are breeched. Too bad the FDA doesn't act in a similar fashion towards known harmful chemicals.
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HazelPethigFan
I don't know until I know
04:30 PM on 10/13/2010
Of most of the dairy farmers I knew growing up..almost all have stopped doing dairy. Most of the dairy farm kids who could go to college went. They never looked back and never get nostalgic. Never. Never. Never. Their are plenty of ex-dairy kids running around this world to keep us in reality when people like this author start talking about their agriculture utopia. This is the utopia which most HuffPost writers and readers salivate over.

If people want dairy to be a certain way, then go do it. Build a dairy operation. Write checks. Go. No one is stopping anyone. I know plenty of old dairy operations in mothballs that could be fixed up. The excuse that people use that Monsanto or Cargill will stop them from doing this is just mega-myth.

Go write checks. Go start a dairy. I'll be the guy rolling on the ground with laughter.
05:39 PM on 10/13/2010
Inheriting a farm doesn't make you a good farmer. It is not uncommon for farm families to become dysfunctional.

All businesses write checks. Land prices are the biggest barrier to a farm business startup.

I think you are wrong about Huff&Puff readers salivating over some bucolic utopian rural life. We really want to be pundits.
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angusmciver
Feels Empty
07:55 PM on 10/15/2010
In the late 60s and early 70s my uncle and grandfather ran one of the top milk producers in N.C. with about 100 to 125 head. Getting out for a number of reasons, one being trying to compete with the onset of mega factory farms. The entire industry turned into in my opinion a sad direction when the production turned toward larger production and profits.
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elcerritan
My bio is not micro
05:25 AM on 10/17/2010
I have heard this story again and again, of smaller dairy farms being driven out of business by the mega outfits.
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tomteboda
08:55 AM on 10/17/2010
The main reason my grandfather got out of the business for early retirement was because of the increasing burden of meeting environmental standards. He had always embraced technology, but he said he was faced with a choice of tripling or more his head count or selling out, because the capitol investment of the waste treatment facility being required by new laws made his ~150 head operation obsolete.
04:28 PM on 10/13/2010
I used to drink organic milk before I gave up dairy altogether. The difference in the taste alone is worth the extra money.
03:46 PM on 10/13/2010
Love your in depth, answer, love that I learned from it, love your sense of humor!
01:58 PM on 10/13/2010
Great article! We often debate this in my house as my husband is a big milk drinker and will run out to the nearest store to supplement his stock with non-organic milk. For me, milk is one of those foods worth splurging on, especially for kids. It's nice to have a clear, concise argument in my favor!
mothergrace
If they knock you down, bite 'em on the ankle.
01:24 PM on 10/13/2010
Whatever decisions you have to make about spending the extra money for organics, it is well worth it for your kids. Even if you succumb to conventional food for yourself in some areas, adults eat far more variety than children and so their ultimate exposure to any one problem ingredient/additive/residue, can be much less.

Some years ago I read that young children often eat from about 20 selected food items that are their favorite, so if they are eating problem foods, high in pesticide residue, antibiotics or whatever, their cumulative exposure will be much greater. If they have an obsession with any one food, it can be even worse.

So if your little one wants peanut butter and peach sandwiches on balloon bread six days a week or is obsessed with apples or milk, get the best you can for them to avoid the worst problems of these foods.
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HUFFPOST BLOGGER
Jennifer Grayson
HuffPost's Miss Eco Etiquette. Editor, The Red, Wh
01:07 PM on 10/18/2010
That's true! A doctor advised me long ago that if you want to reduce your pesticide exposure, eat as varied a diet as possible.
12:10 PM on 10/13/2010
Back in the olden days [41 years ago] I worked on a dairy farm. The milk was what would be called organic nowadays. Back then we just called it milk. The milk from a cow that received antibiotics had to be thrown away for about a week after the the cow stopped receiving treatment. It only happened once. It was a grade A dairy and inspectors checked us out at least once a month. I don't know when or why these rules were relaxed.

I have drank raw milk off and on my whole life and never had any problems. If you keep the cows in a pasture most of the time and clean the poop out of the yard after every milking the cows stay healthy and the milk is clean.

I was stupid to quit that job and go to college.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Vivian Alicia Evans
02:55 AM on 10/16/2010
Corporate farming and deregulation are to blame. I remember a boyfriend of mine who worked on a dairy farm here in Canada in the eighties and cow's on antibiotics were treated the same way here. I don't know if the same regulations exist here, but I doubt it. The food is changing and it's for the worst.

When I was a child milk was processed at a local facility now most is trucked and processed 4 hours away. When the main highway between the interior of B.C. and Vancouver get snowed in, which has happened occasionally, shelves in grocery stores empty. Thank goodness we have choice with local smaller dairies that provide milk and milk products in the valley. Yes, organic milk does taste better in glass bottles.
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inorbit
11:14 AM on 10/13/2010
And you can make your own yogurt - with organic milk - and save tons of money.
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tomteboda
01:30 PM on 10/13/2010
We could all go back to subsistence farm lifestyles and raise all our own food, too.
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HazelPethigFan
I don't know until I know
04:16 PM on 10/13/2010
ok...then do it.
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elcerritan
My bio is not micro
05:31 AM on 10/17/2010
Making yogurt at home is not quite the same as subsistence farming. It's more like making your own salad dressing.
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drumz
The less you know the more you believe.
02:24 PM on 10/13/2010
And sour cream too.
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05:17 PM on 10/13/2010
Sour cream (and its strained cousin cream cheese) and buttermilk are even easier to make at home than yogurt because they use mesophilic cultures that work at or near room temperature. Yogurt uses thermophilic cultures that work at elevated temperatures (100-115F), so you need some sort of heating and/or insulating rig.

I like the Yogotherm. It's basically a two-quart bucket that nests inside a thick expanded polystyrene bucket. You can ferment at any temperature or use it to keep any liquid warm for several hours.
03:18 AM on 10/14/2010
Thanks for the tip! I've become a yogurt making junkie and would LOVE to try making sour cream!
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HUFFPOST COMMUNITY MODERATOR
Mensch99
10:53 AM on 10/13/2010
Thanks for an excellent article. Let me offer two suggestions.

“Even I had to reevaluate my commitment to local and organic once I realized my pregnancy craving for Redwood Hill Farm organic goat yogurt was costing me upwards of 20 bucks a week.” For $20 you can buy a yogurt maker, then have yogurt for the cost of milk.

Good bread is expensive too. I have worn out one breadmaker (after replacing seals twice.) I just use it for kneading and rising then bake it in a clay pot in the oven. I don’t trust Teflon for high temperature cooking.
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tomteboda
01:32 PM on 10/13/2010
How about pyrex?
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08:00 PM on 10/14/2010
Clay is naturaly non-stick and cooks fantasticly even, my cookies and brownies are uniform.

Pyrex is a pain in the ass to clean, oil and has cold spots.
03:23 AM on 10/14/2010
You don't need a yogurt maker... just a mason jar, a thermometer, hot water and a cooler to keep it in while it cultures will do the trick... no plastic that way either!
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SusanElizabeth1949
My micro-bio may be empty but my head isn't.
05:06 PM on 10/18/2010
I use an old 1 gallon glass jar.
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MysticInd
10:42 AM on 10/13/2010
Glad you finally got to the point; I thought you were going the other way. Drink Organic!
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
thecoffeegod
09:37 AM on 10/13/2010
Kroger has begun advertising that the farmers from whom the company buys milk have pledged to raise their cattle rBGH-free.

The problem with 'organic' is there is control over the farm on which the cow currently resides but there is no control over the surrounding farm land. The neighbors may be hell-bent on spraying every bug and fungus into extinction. That has to impact on the 'organic' farm next door.

Feeding your kid is scary. My son was raised without processed foods....until I walked into his daycare one morning unexpectedly and found him happily snarfing animal crackers like they were going out of style.

These days I am far more concerned with HFCS and aspartame.
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mlaiuppa
Pres. Sarcasm Society. Like we need your approval.
03:33 PM on 10/13/2010
I agree about the HFCS, etc. I buy organic milk to avoid all stated in the above article. I also cook from scratch. I try to avoid GMO as much as I can but it is really difficult.

As for the day care, just supply them with snacks and even a lunch for your son. Explain why and they'll watch what they feed him. If they don't, change day cares.
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HUFFPOST BLOGGER
Jennifer Grayson
HuffPost's Miss Eco Etiquette. Editor, The Red, Wh