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Libox: Your "Library Inbox" Launches

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A smart way to organize media files launched yesterday; Libox, a portmanteau of library and inbox, is a free, all-in-one media storage solution that allows users to sync, share and access files like music, photos, or videos on any computer or smartphone with or without the Internet.

Libox founder and CEO Erez Pilosof, says, "I believe that any problem can be solved. I designed Libox so anyone can enjoy their entire high def media collection on any device -- for free and without any limitations." Erez Pilosof also founded Walla!, the Israeli Internet portal. He considers Libox, an Israeli based start up, to be the "Skype of media."

Simply add a song to the Libox desktop application and it becomes instantly available on a user's smartphone and any other computer through a web browser. And it works in reverse; for example, take a picture on an iPhone and the picture will instantly show up in the desktop application.

With Libox, users don't need to think about file formats, folders, settings, file quality loss or cloud storage capacity. Users don't need to think about differences between using Mac or PCs or which web browser is best. Its current aesthetic, a bright black and green, leaves much to be desired. Fortunately its platform is open to developers.

It's easy to invite friends to use Libox and very fast to share media. It's also convenient to have a contact list while browsing music. Libox intelligently understands user's media consumptions, detects user tastes/patterns and passively syncs devices accordingly. It's smart too; it won't just dump endless media onto a smartphone or computer, but it will choose songs users listen to most and make importing decisions based on bandwidth and storage.

It's relatively easy to make a playlist but hard to export a song from Libox to iTunes. It also lacks any media editing device (photo, document, etc) so it won't be replacing an OS or iPhoto equivalent. Therefore users will have to fully commit to using Libox for all of their media storage in order for it not to be just another time-suck application.

Libox, a company which currently has six employees, has received more than 2 million dollars in seed funding from high-growth technology investors such as Evergreen Venture Partners and Rhodium. Libox will launch applications for the iPad, iPhone, and Android this summer. The program has some great ideas but it's not likely to be a complete game-changer without developers building on top of its current format.

 

Follow Courtney Boyd Myers on Twitter: www.twitter.com/CourtneyBMyers