Dan Kraus
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As a founding Board member of the Ontario Invasive Plant Council and holding a M.Sc. from the University of Guelph, Dan Kraus works as a conservation scientist with the Nature Conservancy of Canada in Ontario. He lives in the headwaters of Bronte Creek in the Lake Ontario watershed where he enjoys chopping wood and raising happy chickens along with contributing to the Nature Conservancy of Canada’s blog www.landlines.ca

Entries by Dan Kraus

The Secret Behind Nature Conservation in Canada

(1) Comments | Posted June 26, 2014 | 1:24 PM

There are many reasons why nature conservation is important. We live in a vast and diverse country with habitats and rare species that need our help if they are going to survive. Nature and nature conservation are an important part of our Canadian heritage and our identity.

For more than...

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How One Little Mussel Changed the Great Lakes Forever

(0) Comments | Posted June 5, 2014 | 1:00 PM

Somewhere in the rivers of southern Ontario is a species few people have heard of, and even fewer have ever seen. It's simply named the rainbow. The rainbow is a freshwater clam that gets its name from the rich iridescent colours on its shell. It's so colourful that people once...

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We Should Let Nature Thrive in Cities

(1) Comments | Posted April 15, 2014 | 12:42 PM

Nature and cities can seem like opposing ends of an ecological spectrum. Many see nature in its purist form only in wilderness -- where our human influence is minimal, or at least hidden. Cities are the grey places on the map that testify to our domination over nature. Places of...

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Why Do Forests Matter? A Call to Conserve the Last Great Forests

(0) Comments | Posted November 6, 2013 | 4:59 PM

There are few other groups of species that have impacted the face of our planet more than trees. We define the major life zones of earth based on the presence or absence of forests.

At one time all plants were grasses, ferns and horsetails -- green plants that used chlorophyll...

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