THE BLOG
09/21/2012 02:53 pm ET Updated Nov 21, 2012

The High Stakes of Child Poverty

I met Amber at a tutoring program for inner city children. It was 1966, my senior year in high school, and the war on poverty was on, a war we've failed to win.

At nine-years-old Amber looked like a scarecrow, an old scarecrow at that, bird-picked, weather beaten. She was stick thin. None of her clothes fit, hand-me-downs from her sister Bunny who quickly outgrew her clothes while her younger sister didn't seem to grow at all. Her eyes were dark circled; her hair, straw and falling out.

Saturday mornings she was one of the first kids through the church basement doors. My friends and I weren't naïve. We knew that that gaggle of children who showed up each week wasn't there for the mandatory hour of instruction. They put up with our drilling them on the timestables or helping them parse a paragraph. They were really there for the cookies and milk, and the tables spread with art supplies and games. It wasn't until years later that I realized that they may have been just as eager for our attention, our reliability, and perhaps even our youthful faith in the future as for those treats.

I worked with Amber all that year. She didn't progress much. But that didn't seem to matter. She was always there. Besides, there was something else going on: I was being tutored in what poverty was really all about.

Walking Amber home several times I got to see where she lived -- a cramped, drafty tenement -- and to meet the rest of her family. Her mother, Mrs. Laurel, was as frail and battered looking as Amber. She had a nervous tic that twitched her head, a purple bruise on her cheekbone, a baby on her hip and a toddler pulling at her housecoat. Peter, a year older than Amber, dervished through the apartment while Bunny, a twelve-year-old with a fifteen-year-old's body, refused to say hello.

There were no secrets in the Laurel family. Sitting at their kitchen table I heard how Bunny was boy-crazy, how Peter ate paste in school, and how they all loved margarine and sugar sandwiches. Amber, I was told, shared the bed of whatever brother or sister let her: she was a bed wetter. Pointing to the toddler pulling a waste basket over and the baby on her lap, Mrs. Laurel told me how "Mr. Laurel" was in and out of the house. "That's what these two are all about," she laughed ruefully then touched her cheekbone.

I lost track of the Laurels when I went off to college and got involved in another war -- the war against the war, the Vietnam War. I didn't think about them until Ronald Reagan in the 1980s started talking about the "deserving poor." By then I was teaching kids in an alternative high school that very well could've been the children of an Amber or a Peter or a Bunny. I remember at the time wondering if the Laurels would've fit Reagan's criteria for "deserving." What would he have made of that bubble bath that tumbled out of the grocery bag Mrs. Laurel plopped down on the table one day when I was there? Or the endless packages of Lick-a-maid her kids lapped up from their grimy palms instead of lunch?

And now, years later, census figures show that the U.S. poverty rate has hit its highest levels since President Johnson declared war on it, and that child poverty has increased from its 2010 22 percent level.

This is especially bad news in these high stakes, high pressure days of "educational reform." How will the Ambers of this world fare with so much depending on a student's test performance especially when "education reformers" continue to refuse to acknowledge the crippling role that economic disparity plays in academic performance? Yet the stakes have gotten higher. According to a recent Council on Foreign Relations report, "US Education Reform and National Security," (a report Diane Ravitch called the latest education "jeremiad") educational failures are indeed a threat to national security. Another burden put on young shoulders.

In 1962 Michael Harrington showed America the face of "the invisible poor." Now that the ranks of the Ambers among us are growing will we finally be able to look squarely into those faces and help the children of poverty achieve true academic parity? Or do we -- and they -- have to wait another 50 years?

Originally appeared on Reclaiming Futures

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