Huffpost Business
The Blog

Featuring fresh takes and real-time analysis from HuffPost's signature lineup of contributors

Debra Fine Headshot

Three Steps to Savvy Sales

Posted: Updated:
Print Article

2014-03-12-images.jpeg

Everything in life is really sales, isn't it? Even if you aren't technically selling some
thing, you are selling something. You are selling a product, your services, yourself.

You're questioning my logic right now, I can feel it, but think about it for a moment. The ads on television, social media, the radio and the newspaper are there for a reason -- to get you to buy whatever it is they've got. It could be a ticket to a game, a trip to a restaurant, a better car, a new cable company, a leaner physique, shinier hair, a different credit card carrier or airline of choice. Sales and more sales. All of it.

But even a first date is really a sales pitch. As is persuading a toddler to eat carrots, a teenager to put down the phone, an employee to finish a report and a husband to stop FOR THE LOVE OF GOD telling that same, long story that you have heard a thousand times. Life is really one gigantic sales pitch. Sigh.

So how do you get your customers to buy that car, that facelift, that training seminar? How do you get the three-year-old to power through a plate of vegetables and Miss Right to say "yes!" to whatever you happen to be suggesting (which is really none of my business but I am rooting for you anyway)? By building a relationship, of course.

Relationship-building in business is nothing new. After all, it's why Coca-Cola is and always will be Coca-Cola. They've managed to appeal to the masses while making us each feel special. They've inserted themselves into American history and sold us on nostalgia and patriotism and even Santa Claus. It's quite a feat. But what Coca-Cola, like Walt Disney or Steve Jobs or that first guy that was selling OxyClean understands -- granted, on a different level than us -- is that you must know who your customers are and what they need. Or want. Or think they need. Or think they want. Follow me?

I know that there is an incredible amount of information out there on customer care, and trying to synthesize it all here would be impossible. Still, there are simple strategies that anyone, even the non-Steve-Jobs of us, can adopt. Here are my favorites:

Be Normal:
It's harder than it seems. There are a lot of not normal people out there, and we've all met them. The slick sales guy selling snake oil still exists, he's just morphed into a telemarketer or a multi-level marketing guru. The best way to earn your customers' goodwill is to present yourself as a humble, respectful individual. I don't mean present yourself as that person, actually be that person. By being human and politely inquisitive, you put customers and clients at ease; and as the saying goes, "people buy from people they like."

Be Clear:
What makes sense to you does not always make sense to someone else. You, after all, are an expert in your field. If your customer were an expert in your field, he or she would not be a (potential) customer, he would be a colleague or a competitor, or even your boss! Explain information from the customer point of view and watch for that look of understanding before plowing ahead. If you notice signs of confusion or something that resembles a stroke, slow down and ask if there is a need for clarification. This is not the time to show off, using all the acronyms and jargon and technical terms. Can't stop yourself? Go back to the Be Normal step and review.

Be Savvy:
Asking a potential customer a good question can offer a great amount of feedback. Do your research prior to meeting with a new customer, and learn as much as you can about them and their business. You are wasting their time (and yours) if you don't take this crucial step. Plus, it provides a great opportunity for small talk, of which I am a fan, as you know. Open ended questions, such as "How can I help?" sound almost too simple, but they work. Once you have a rapport going, provide customers with specific information on what your product or service does, but emphasize how it can help THEM, instead of simply listing all the bells and whistles: Will your services increase productivity or revenue? Are you a more-reliable, cost-effective resource? The more you understand a customer's particular goals, the more likely you are to provide them with a solution to their problem, instead of just a quick fix.

Customer care is a huge topic, but the steps to success are really quite simple. Be forthright and honest. Tell them the truth in an attractive way, without exaggerating. If your product or service is the right fit, and if you approach your customers on their level and keep their goals in mind, you are on your way to building a relationship with a client. That's almost as good as a trip to Disney.